Superdelegates

Casey McDermott, NHPR

Following outcry over the role of superdelegates in the party’s presidential nomination, New Hampshire Democrats voted to reform the delegate selection process ahead of the 2020 presidential primary. 

About three months after the primary and two months ahead of the Democratic National Convention, Bernie Sanders has picked up his first New Hampshire superdelegate — Martha Fuller Clark, a state senator from Portsmouth and the vice chair of the state party.

Allegra Boverman / NHPR

In this tumultuous election, delegate math has a source of contention, with some calling the process rigged and many Americans scratching their heads about how much their votes matter.  And while the Indiana primary may have quelled some uncertainty for the GOP, questions remain. Meanwhile, on the Democratic side, the delegate hunt continues.

NHPR Staff

Sure, the prospect of being a delegate to a national political convention has always been a big deal — but it's usually also kind of a formality.

By the time a convention rolls around, parties typically know who’s gathered enough support to earn the nomination, according to whatever rules they’ve established in advance.

Not so in 2016.

Brady Carlson / NHPR

The Democratic Party is facing pushback over its rules around super-delegates, as voters question whether the system will end up hindering Bernie Sanders’s chance at the nomination despite the results of the popular vote in New Hampshire's primary.

Florida Memory / Flickr/CC

Although Bernie Sanders won New Hampshire's primary by a landslide, he lags behind on so-called super delegates, who have already committed to Clinton. That raises questions among some about just how democratic the Democratic party is. Meanwhile, the Republican party has its own nominating process -- and challenges.