Supreme Court

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The U.S. Supreme Court ruled in favor of a limited version of President Trump's travel ban this week, saving broader consideration for the fall.  We cover the legal arguments and look at other high-profile high court cases this term, including First Amendment issues on trademarks and hate speech. 


The Supreme Court says it will decide the fate of President Trump's revised travel ban, agreeing to hear arguments over immigration cases that were filed in federal courts in Hawaii and Maryland and allowing parts of the ban that has been on hold since March to take effect.

The justices removed the two lower courts' injunctions against the ban "with respect to foreign nationals who lack any bona fide relationship with a person or entity in the United States," narrowing the scope of those injunctions that had put the ban in limbo.

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On today's show:

Weekly N.H. News Roundup: March 31, 2017

Mar 31, 2017

The New Hampshire House gets ready to vote on it's version of the state budget, but some conservatives say the Republican-crafted budget is too rich.  New Hampshire's two U.S. senators say they'll vote against Neil Gorsuch, President Trump's Supreme Court pick.  A new energy project coming from Canada and an adverse decision by regulators thickens the plot when it comes to the Northern Pass project.  


Getty images, via NPR

NPR Politics team is blogging the Senate Judiciary Committee's hearings on the nomination of Judge Neil Gorsuch to the U.S. Supreme Court. The live blog below includes streaming video, with posts featuring highlights, context and analysis from NPR reporters and correspondents.

President Trump's pick for the Supreme Court is testifying before the Senate Judiciary Committee. If confirmed, Gorsuch would fill the high court seat left vacant in February 2016, after the death of Justice Antonin Scalia.

3.6.17: Overturning the SCOTUS & The Caped Crusade

Mar 6, 2017
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On today's show:

Episode 9: Overturning a Supreme Court Ruling

Feb 21, 2017

We're staying on the federal court system beat with a deeper look into the Supreme Court. The word "supreme"is defined as: “an authority or office superior to all others.”  So when the Supreme Court decides on a case, it’s final, right? Not exactly. In Episode 9, we cover the handful of ways a Supreme Court ruling can be overturned.

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All this week we're revisiting some of our favorite Writers on a New England Stage interviews featuring two Supreme Court Justices, a SCOTUS scholar and a presidential scholar. Here's the schedule for this week: 

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  Former Republican U.S. Senator Kelly Ayotte has been tapped by the White House to lead the effort of shepherding U.S. Supreme Court nominee Neil Gorsuch through Capitol Hill.

President Donald Trump named Gorsuch Tuesday night as his pick to fill the seat left vacant by Antonin Scalia, who died last year.

Legal decisions are rarely read for pleasure. And though read, re-read, excerpted and quoted, they are not always "quotable." Clocking in at an average of just under 5000 words, they can sound jargony, pompous and bone-dry in the wrong hands. But what about the right hands? Today's 10-Minute Writers Workshop asks an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States about what goes into writing an opinion.

U.S. Government

The Supreme Court ended it's term June 30th, issuing a slew of decisions.  We look at three rulings:  one involving gun ownership and domestic violence cases, another on affirmative action in college admissions and a third on political corruption. A look at how this unusual eight member court ruled and what ramifications these three particular decisions might have for New Hampshire.

Chris Jensen for NHPR

U.S. Senator Kelly Ayotte had what she described as a cordial meeting with Supreme Court nominee Merrick Garland Wednesday.

Ayotte is among a group of Republicans who have been willing to meet with President Obama's nominee to replace the late Antonin Scalia, but who remain opposed to holding hearings or a vote.

In a statement released after Wednesday’s meeting, Ayotte says she thanked Garland for her service, and spoke with him about his background and judicial philosophy.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

 

Republican Sen. Kelly Ayotte of New Hampshire is going to be meeting with President Barack Obama's nominee to the U.S. Supreme Court.

Ayotte will have a one-on-one meeting with Merrick Garland on Wednesday in Washington.

New Hampshire's senior senator, Democrat Jeanne Shaheen, met with Garland last week.

Ayotte is part of a group of Republicans who have said they are willing to meet with Garland, but remain opposed to hearings and a vote.

Shaheen To Meet With Supreme Court Nominee Garland

Apr 4, 2016
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  New Hampshire US Senator Jeanne Shaheen is set to meet this week with President Obama's nominee to the US Supreme Court. 

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New Hampshire's US Senators are split on what the Senate should do now that President Obama has chosen Merrick Garland as his nominee to the US Supreme Court. 

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Mid-life crises are embarrassing and all-too-common...but surely not among the prudent judges of nation's highest court? On today’s show, a former court clerk's new novel imagines a Supreme Court justice going off the rails.

Then, we'll hear about how today's gyms are building personal bathrooms and shower stalls for body shy millennials -- one writer thinks it's absurd for adults to fear getting undressed in front of others.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

New Hampshire Senator Jeanne Shaheen is calling on her Republican colleagues to do their jobs and hold confirmation hearings for President Obama’s nominee to the U.S. Supreme Court.

The unexpected death of Justice Antonin Scalia and the looming face-off between the White House and the Senate over his replacement have revived proposals that would limit the tenure of U.S. Supreme Court justices.

Legal scholars from both political parties renewed a call Tuesday to reconsider how much time justices spend on the high court. Many of them cited, with disapproval, a bruising and protracted clash building between President Obama and the GOP-controlled Senate over when and how to fill Scalia's vacancy.

RICCARDO S. SAVI, GETTY IMAGES

Gov. Maggie Hassan ordered New Hampshire flags to half staff to honor Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia, who died this weekend at age 79.

“Justice Scalia served our country with honor and our entire nation mourns his sudden loss,” Hassan wrote in a statement. “Tom and I send our deepest condolences to Maureen, his entire family, and his many friends, loved ones and colleagues.”

Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia died unexpectedly on Saturday. We spoke to NPR's Legal Affairs Correspondent Nina Totenberg about his life, legacy and what's next.

1. Let's talk about Scalia's legal perspective. He was known as a proponent of originalism. Can you tell us a bit about that?

Originalism, as defined by Justice Scalia and others, is that what is in the Constitution literally is what the founding fathers meant.

President Obama struck a somber tone, remembering the late-Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia as a "towering legal mind" who influenced a generation, but made it clear, he intends to replace him.

"I plan to fulfill my constitutional responsibilities to nominate a successor in — due time," Obama said. "There will be plenty of time for me to do so, and for the Senate to fulfill its responsibility to give that person a fair hearing and a timely vote."

Justice Antonin Scalia loved a good fight.

So it's only fitting that news of his death at age 79 ignited an immediate and partisan battle over who might take his place on the U.S. Supreme Court.

Jeff Kubina via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/tbJue

Mid-life crises are embarrassing and all-too-common...but surely not among the prudent judges of nation's highest court? On today’s show, a former court clerk's new novel imagines a Supreme Court justice going off the rails.

Then, as millions vow to exercise in the new year, we'll hear about how today's gyms are building personal bathrooms and shower stalls for body shy millennials -- one writer thinks it's absurd for adults to fear getting undressed in front of others.

The U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday weighs an elections case that could dramatically change the way state legislative districts are drawn and could tilt some states in a decidedly more Republican direction.

The federal Constitution is clear. The national government's House of Representatives is to be apportioned based on the total population in each district, and the census is to count each person, whether eligible to vote or not, so that all are represented. The status of state legislative districts, however, is less clear.

courtesy Flickr/NCinDC.

 

New Hampshire Right To Life will not receive documents about Planned Parenthood they requested from the federal government five years ago.

On Monday, the Supreme Court decided not to hear an appeal to a lower court ruling that allowed the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services to withhold documents, in part because the documents contain confidential commercial information that might undermine Planned Parenthood’s ability to compete for patients.

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The High Court recently kicked off its fall term, with a docket full of hot-button social issues, including abortion and birth control.  Other highly watched cases concern unions among public sector workers and the use of affirmative action in college admissions.  We’re looking at what’s ahead and which way the court might go.

GUESTS:

  • John Greabe – law professor at UNH School of Law
  • David Savage – Supreme Court and legal issues reporter for the Los Angeles Times

Jeff Kubina / Flickr CC

The U.S. Supreme Court has released several landmark rulings recently, but the decisions on same-sex marriage and the Affordable Care Act upstaged other major cases -- from redistricting to clean air rules to housing discrimination. We discuss those rulings you haven’t heard about and the impact they may have on New Hampshire.

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This week, South Carolina’s senate debates whether the Confederate flag should be removed from public view at the state capitol. We're looking at the film that helped resuscitate the confederacy after the Civil War – D.W. Griffith’s The Birth of a Nation. Then, when NBC canceled Hannibal earlier this summer, fans hardly had time to complain before rumors began to circulate about the show being picked up by one of the online streaming services now keeping shows alive long after networks give up on them. Finally, a Supreme Court case that was overshadowed by an historic slate of decisions. A California farm challenged a Depression-era law that allows the government to forcibly appropriate food crops to control prices.

Mike Ledford / Flickr/CC

The US supreme court issues some huge rulings on same-sex marriage and the affordable care act. The shooting deaths of nine black churchgoers in Charleston prompts renewed political discussion of gun control, and the confederate flag. And, the republican presidential field grows ever larger.

Governor Maggie Hassan is calling the Supreme Court's decision to legalize same-sex marriage in all 50 states a “momentous victory” and says she’s extremely proud that New Hampshire helped to "pave the way. "   New Hampshire recognized civil unions in 2008 and legalized gay marriage two years later.

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