Supreme Court

The Roberts Court

Jun 18, 2013

In a new book, veteran Washington Correspondent Marcia Coyle explores the inner workings of the Supreme Court under the leadership of Chief Justice John Roberts.  Coyle examines how the Roberts Court has dealt with some of the most incendiary issues of the day – including gay marriage, health care, second amendment rights, and campaign finance reform. 

Guest

As the U.S. Supreme court hears two cases concerning same-sex marriage this week, we’ll get reaction from New Hampshire people involved in this issue.  Our state is among the nine which allow same-sex couples to marry.  We’ll talk with those involved in making this happen and those who believe it was the wrong choice.

Guests:

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Today the US Supreme Court heard arguments related to the case of a New Hampshire woman seriously injured after taking a generic drug

As senior legal analyst for CNN, staff writer for the New Yorker, and the author of The Nine, Jeffrey Toobin knows more than a few things about and more than a few people inside the United States Supreme Court.

Flikr Creative Commons / Fifth World Art

This is a closer look at the Supreme Court’s Ruling as it relates to Medicaid in the Granite State. Under the upheld law, an additional 17 million people nationwide are set to become eligible for Medicaid in 2014. That’s a 27 percent increase. The new threshold is $29,000 dollars a year for a family of four.

New Hampshire’s congressional delegation is reacting largely along party lines to the Supreme Court’s ruling on health care.

whitehouse.gov

In case you missed hearing President Obama's speech on the Supreme Court's decision to uphold the Affordable Care Act, you can watch the full speech below courtesy of the White House Blog.

 

<a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/momentsnotice/3494085120/">massmatt</a> / Flickr

A look at the statements made by N.H.'s congressional delegation, state lawmakers and state politicians.

The U.S. Supreme Court is expected to rule today in the constitutionality of the Affordable Care Act. Today is the last day of the Court's current term, and the ruling is expected to be released not long after 10 a.m. NHPR will bring you coverage through the day and the days ahead of what this highly-anticipated decision will mean. Join us today at 2:00 p.m. for a special edition of Talk of the Nation and check back at NHPR.org for updates.

Mark Fischer via Flickr CC / www.flickr.com/photos/fischerfotos

Updated at 10:41 a.m. The Supreme Court ruled to uphold the Affordable Care Act. NHPR continues to bring you coverage throughout the day, and reports tonight on All Things Considered.

The U.S. Supreme Court is expected to rule today in the constitutionality of the Affordable Care Act. Today is the last day of the Court's current term, and the ruling is expected to be released not long after 10 a.m. 

NHPR will bring you coverage through the day and the days ahead of what this highly-anticipated decision will mean.

The Supreme Court has dealt privacy advocates a huge setback. By a 5-3 majority, the court ruled that people who sue the government for invading their privacy can only recover out-of-pocket damages. And whistle-blower lawyers say that leaves victims who suffer emotional trouble and smeared reputations with few if any options.

Justice Samuel Alito and all four of his conservative colleagues turned back a challenge from a pilot named Stan Cooper. (Justice Elena Kagan did not participate in the case.)

NHPR Staff

Do indigent parents have a constitutional right to a lawyer when the state charges that parent with abuse or neglect of their child?

That’s the question put to the state’s top court.

Last year, lawmakers passed a historic budget – making cuts to General Fund spending for the first time since World War II.

One of the casualties....the $1.2 million dollars provided to indigent parents for legal representation in child abuse and neglect proceedings.

Over the past several years, 350-400 parents a year are charged, typically for neglect.

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