Technology

Bitcoin.org

A digital currency is getting traction with New Hampshire residents looking for an alternative to the dollar.

 What is Bitcoin?

On the front door of the Pao Café in downtown Newmarket, there’s a familiar collage of credit card stickers - Amex, Discover, Visa - and one that’s not so familiar. It reads: ‘Bitcoin accepted here.'

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There was a time when locking the Vatican’s doors was enough to ensure secrecy over the process of choosing a new pope – but with at least seventeen cardinals on Twitter, and who knows how many on Facebook – the church isn’t taking any chances.   The Vatican has now installed something called a “Faraday Cage” – a device sort of like the “Cone of Silence” from the 1960 spy comedy, “Get Smart”, designed to keep what happens in the Vatican… well, in the Vatican. Joining us today to unlock the secrets of the Faraday Cage is Rob Fleischman, Chief Technology Officer at Xero-Cole, and our favorite explainer of all things wired.

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You may have never heard of a “haptic interface”, but chances are you use one every day.  When your cell phone vibrates in your pocket to tell you someone is calling – that’s a haptic interface.  The visual and audio design of new technologies tend to soak up attention from reviewers and users alike – but recent revolutions in haptics remind us there is another sense gadgets can use to communicate –touch. 

Nathan Hurst is a staff writer for Wired, where he recently wrote about the sensational future of the haptic interface.

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This past fall we spoke with Robert Ito about the growing phenomenon of human-robot bonding. His article "The Love Bot" was featured in Pacific Standard Magazine. From C-3PO to WALL-E, the loveable robot has long inhabited popular imagination. Robots like the Japanese made "Paro," pillow pets, and vacuum cleaning Roombas are engineered to be social.

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Today when dogs do a disappearing act, infrared cameras, tracking devices, and social media help owners keep tabs on wandering pets. These security technologies are a growing part of the 56-billion dollars spent annually on America’s pets.

http://www.intouchhealth.com

Last week, the FDA approved the first self-navigating communications robot for use in hospitals. The RP-Vita which stands for remote presence virtual independent telemedicine assistant – was created by iRobot and In-Touch. The FDA sanction for the self-guided robot could mark a new era of robotic care in hospitals here in the United States.  Joining us with more on how RP-Vita works is Marcio Macedo, Director of Product Management for iRobot’s remote presence business unit.

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The best and brightest segments from our daily program.

Code for America

The non-profit Code for America brings together coders, artists, and designers to create easy to use applications that address the specific needs of local communities.  Mick Thompson, engineer in residence and 2012 fellow at Code for America joined us to talk about how code and collaboration leads to better lives for citizens.

The Museum of Modern Art in New York recently added 14 video games to its permanent collection. Killscreen says they helped.

Killscreen co-founder Jamin Warren explains how, and helps us answer the burning question, are video games art?

Mourning a Loved One Via the Internet

Dec 5, 2012
cromely via Flickr Creative Commons

The funeral industry is embracing the digital age. Funeral homes are beefing up their websites and social media to include tributes and photographs of the departed.

Top 3 High-Tech Marriage Busters

Dec 3, 2012
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We discussed the quickly-developing market for spousal surveillance technology with Wall Street Journal reporter Jennifer Valentino. You can listen to her interview here:

In the meantime, we were surprised to learn how marriage and divorce are being affected by technology...and how quickly it's all happened:

1) Social Media: Breeding Ground for Evidence

Word of Mouth's favorite explainer of all things wired Rob Fleischman discusses our beloved internet devices and the emerging technologies that may be gearing up to take their spot.

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Word of Mouth's weekend program includes some of our favorite stories from from the daily program.

Part 1: Syria/Chemical Dangers

When we first saw Robert Ito's Pacific Standard piece on folks who've fallen in love with their robots, we were all....huh? So of course, we booked him on the show. You can listen to that interview here:

But all that talk about human-robot love got us thinking...if a robot is the love of your life, how do you show it? Here are some ideas we dug up:

1) Buy him a snazzy costume!

One Laptop Per Child

The trope goes something like this: one minute you’re teaching your kid to tie his shoes, and the next he’s showing you how to use the new Blu-Ray player. No doubt, fresh minds tend to have an easier time adapting to new technologies – but does the cliché hold water in third-world countries where kids have never seen so much as a calculator? 

PhOtOnQuAnTiQuE via FLickr Creative Commons

From C-3PO to WALL-E, the loveable robot has long inhabited popular imagination. Today we examine the increasing melding of fantasy and reality…the social robot has begun to win the hearts and minds of people all around the world.

Alexandre Lemieux via Credit Flikr Creative Commons

With E-book sales outpacing print books, the days of the heavyweight backpack are numbered. In New Hampshire, thirty-three public schools banded together to purchase E-books instead of textbooks. Producer Sam Evans-Brown finds out why public schools are making the switch now, and why the long wait.

Read and Listen to Sam's story here.

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In 2010, Ad Week declared the “Get a Mac” campaign to be the the best campaign of the first decade of the 20th century. The beloved series of ads pitted John Hodgman as a stodgy stand-in for PC’s trading barbs with Justin Long and a cast of hip-looking, unflappable surrogates for Macs. Samsung took a page from that ad, rolling out a new commercial; its Galaxy s-3 that takes a stab at Apple true believers, waiting in a long line for the new iPhone 5.

What do you think?

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An app released this week called Silent Circle says it offers NSA level encryption tools to ordinary citizens. That means e-mails, phone calls, and text messages can’t be traced, intercepted, or recovered by just about anybody. Russell Brandom is a staff writer for Buzzfeed, where he wrote about the developers of Silent Circle.

Check out "A Peek into Silent Circle":

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Every Google search, every saved photograph, streamed song, text message and each stroke of the e-mail send button is served and stored on a digital infrastructure that is – to the end user – invisible.  The New York Times has spent a year investigating the tens of thousands of data centers that support the information industry, and discovered a secretive, power-sucking infrastructure sharply at odds with its sleek, e

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New forensic evidence may confirm what many suspected behind-the-scenes: that the US and Israel conspired earlier this year to target Iran with the espionage malware “Flame”. Dan Goodin is Security Editor at Ars Technica and he's closely followed the unfolding story.     

cattias.photos via Flickr Creative Commons

It’s been only been a year since Apple revealed the iPhone 4s to the world:  it looked a lot like its predecessors, but included one game changing new feature: voice assistance technology.  A short time later, we had Apple guru and explainer-of-all-things-wired Rob Fleischman on the show.  Well, it’s one year later and Rob is back to talk about the iPhone 5,

Last week, the Justice Department approved New Hampshire's new law requiring voters to present a valid photo ID at the polls, or to sign an affidavit attesting to their identity in order to vote. Josh Rogers, NHPR’s Senior Political Reporter, is here with more on what New Hampshire voters can expect. 

and

Leo Reynolds via Flickr Creative Commons

Part 1: Chasing Lightning/Birth Photography

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Automotive safety is generally focused on the driver and the  vehicle,  rather than unknown dangers of the road … features like anti-lock brakes, airbags, back-up cameras and crumple zones increase buyer confidence and sticker price. 

Cambridge University Press

This presentation was given at the Unitarian Universalist church in Peterborough, N.H. on August 19. The presentation will air on NHPR at 4 p.m. on Saturday.

From the Monadnock Summer Lyceum:

Photo Credit Michael Kappel, Via Flickr Creative Commons

But we begin with news from the world of computing…the cult of Steve Jobs is a buzz over remarks made by Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak last week at the Entel Technology Conference in Chile.

So, how'd it go?

Jun 7, 2012

Earlier this week, we talked to our go-to internet guy about a switch to be flipped on a whole new version of the internet. Yesterday was World IPV6 Day, and as tech decoder Rob Fleischman explained, converting to the new web protocol was designed to solve the impending problem of the internet running out of IP addresses…those are the numerical codes designating the addresses of websites, pages, computers and hardware on networks. Well, Wednesday passed…the conversion happened…and our computers are still working.

(Photo by Creecher94 via Flickr Creative Commons)

Tomorrow will bring a long-awaiting moment for the internet…it’s IPV6 Day, when a whole new version of the web will officially go live. But don’t worry, says our next guest, there should be no change in the way most of us use the internet…as long as everything goes as planned. Here to explain IPV6 and a few other tech stories bubbling up is Rob Fleischman. He’s a web developer and entrepreneur, CTO of Xerocole, and Word of Mouth’s explainer of all things wired. 

 

Rob explains some challenges for developers when IPV6 goes live:

rego-d4u / Flickr Creative Commons

Icons of creativity like Steve Jobs and Mark Zuckerberg are romanticized as lone wolves, toiling alone deep into the night on ideas that one day change the world. Truth is, most get help along the way. Even Thomas Edison had a crew: 40 or so scientists helped him invent the light bulb. So is it the 'I' or the team that matters most?

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