Technology

(Photo by <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/angelaypablo/860181962/" target="_blank">aranarth</a> via Flickr Creative Commons)

There's a gathering of developers and code writers taking place globally...and they're invading Manchester to create apps for doing good. 

LINKS:

Random Hacks of Kindness

Manchester gathering info

Small Dog Electronics

(Photo by <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/arwing3/3991116008/" target="_blank">That One Doood</a> via Flickr Creative Commons)

At the dawn of the MP3 era, music-lovers digitized their CD collections, racking up thousands of hours of songs on their home computers, while clearing out their shelves. The thrill was soon followed by the realization that most of us owned far more music than we had time to listen to.

Photo courtesy of the Hood at Dartmouth

Reverse migration: African American populations boomerang back below the Mason-Dixon line.  Plus, why adding "sandwich board" to your resume could be a good thing.  Also, an NGO spreading sustainability in Niger turns 10.  And a look at a Native American Art exhibition from the Hood at Dartmouth.  Finally, data through light - the future of electronic transfer?

Photo by Moe M, courtesy of Flickr Creative Commons

Pastor Joel Kruggel of the Bethany Covenant Church in Bedford talks about his congregation's work providing Sudanese refugees with their own place of worship, as well as computer literacy classes and computers. 

 

LINKS

To donate, contact The Bethany Covenant Church

More about the Sudanese Evangelical Covenant Church in Manchester

courtesy New Hampshire High Tech Council

A planetarium on your flat-screen monitor. Streaming music from an iPad all over the house. And a germ-fighting mask for health care first responders dealing with an outbreak of disease.

Those are some a few of the finalists in the New Hampshire High Tech Council’s Product of the Year award, which will be presented tonight at an event in Manchester.

<a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/niteseeker/69962792/in/photostream/" target="blank">Melinda Taber</a> via Flickr/Creative Commons

Ever used one of those machines at the gym where you can place your hands on the grips and it'll track your heart rate? German scientists - probably the ones who spend a lot of time working out  - wondered if they could put those sensors in the steering wheel of a car to detect driver stress.

The Nuclear Clock is Too Accurate For This Universe

Nov 7, 2011
<a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/doggie52/3597226869/in/photostream/" target="blank">Doggie52</a> via Flickr/Creative Commons

The atomic clock is so accurate that, had it been running since the Big Bang, 13+ billion years ago, it would only be off of "real" time by four seconds.

Scientists at the Georgia Institute of Technology want to build a nuclear clock that, when asked for comment on the atomic clock's accuracy, shrugs and says, "that's totally b-list."

Photo Credit: Acid Zero from Flickr Creative Commons

Our tech expert Rob Fleischman predicts the next Apple revolution - the iTV.  Imagine a giant iPad.  Plus, a conversation with the exceptionally knowledgable iPhone secretary, SIRI.

How has technology changed the ways that we interact with one another? Sherry Turkle's Alone Together: Why We Expect More from Technology and Less from Each Other is the third in a trilogy exploring this question. Social networking, e-mail and texting, Turkle says, provide the façade of socialization but ultimately leave their users dissatisfied and disconnected. It may be time to reflect and reconsider the role we really want technology to play in our lives.

Links:

How has technology changed the ways that we interact with one another? Sherry Turkle's Alone Together: Why We Expect More from Technology and Less from Each Other is the third in a trilogy exploring this question. Social networking, e-mail and texting, Turkle says, provide the façade of socialization but ultimately leave their users dissatisfied and disconnected. It may be time to reflect and reconsider the role we really want technology to play in our lives.

Links:

Since the beginning of time, human beings have been making tools to make life easier, better, faster or more efficient, but is that always a good thing? Are human beings happier today, whether individually or collectively, because of telephones, washing machines, text-messaging cell-phones, and iPods? Are there limitations on how much technology we should produce, or allow in our lives?

Guest

  • Max Latona, Associate Professor of Philosophy at St. Anselm College

 

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