The Exchange

2018 Election Preview: Congressional Districts 1 & 2

17 hours ago
NHPR Flickr

We preview New Hampshire's mid-term elections.  While actual voting is a year away, a crowd of potential candidates is already weighing the possibilities.  That's especially true in the First Congressional District: with an open seat and a reputation for being unpredictable.  We find out more - also, an update on how President Trump's health care order may affect New Hampshire. 

GUESTS:

Watch Out, Kale: Why Seaweed Is The New Superfood

Oct 11, 2017

The Gulf of Maine is home to some of the world’s most beautiful and versatile seaweeds, also known as sea vegetables, ocean herbs, or marine macroalgae.  We discuss what's fueling the increasing demand for this latest superfood; it's turning up in some surprising places - from sophisticated restaurants to craft breweries.  We learn the basics of foraging for seaweeds for use in home cooking, as well as efforts to develop a market for sustainably farmed seaweeds.

Michael Saechang via Flickr/CC

After the Las Vegas massacre, the debate over guns is back, in Congress and in the Granite State. At one point soon after the shooting, it seemed there might be a narrow area of agreement:  banning or regulating a device called a "bump-stock" that accelerated gunfire in the most recent mass shooting.  Still, as our conversation made plain, vast differences of opinion remain, and common ground may be fast disappearing. 


Boston commuter cities like Nashua are jumping on the chance to develop a private passenger rail, after years of unsuccessful campaigning for a public rail system. New Hampshire's zoning ordinances and city planning processes are drawing criticism for their contribution to the current over-priced housing market. And millennials get their own commission to help the state appeal to a younger population. 


Paige Sutherland for NHPR

New Hampshire is the Granite State...we like our landscapes and our people to be tough. But New Hampshire is also known for its beauty, our forests and mountains. Our trails, fields, and cold-water coastline.

What this state isn’t known for are its islands. But today, we’re changing that.

With the end of summer rapidly approaching we're dedicating this episode of The Exchange entirely to the islands of New Hampshire. We’ve got stories from the Seacoast and the Lakes Region to the North Country. Stories of camps, boats, warring lobstermen, and inescapable beauty.

This show originally aired in September, 2017. 

Listen to the episode:


Weekly N.H. News Roundup: October 6, 2017

Oct 5, 2017

Sen. Maggie Hassan announced she is helping to introduce legislation designed to prevent modifications that allow for the rapid fire of semi-automatic weapons. One of the Manchester VA whistleblowers has announced he will challenge Democrat Annie Kuster in New Hampshire's second district as a Republican. And Granite Staters fill more than 20 trucks with supplies for Puerto Rico, thanks to a N.H. state house drive that exceeded expectations.


The fall foliage season is sweeping through New Hampshire, causing residents and leaf-peepers to appreciate anew the forests in the state.  The colors of the season are a function of forest health, and we look closely at efforts to restore and protect three iconic tree species: elm, ash, and chestnut.  And a new report finds that New England is losing 65 acres of forestland per day


Franchise Opportunities; Flickr

After the Graham-Cassidy Bill proposed by Republicans -- their latest Repeal and Replace effort -- failed to garner enough votes recently, patients, healthcare providers, and insurers still face plenty of uncertainty before open enrollment begins November 1. Meanwhile, Senator Bernie Sanders's single-payer proposal continues to gain fans. We'll get the latest on how national politics is shaping the health care debate across the country.  

GUEST:

The Las Vegas Shooting: Granite Staters Respond

Oct 2, 2017
Ken Lund, Flickr

It's been called the worst mass shooting in modern American history.  On Sunday evening, a gunman opened fire on an outdoor concert festival  in Las Vegas, killing at least 58 people and injuring many more. Some of the stories surrounding the massacre are eerily familiar: Family members of the gunman express shock upon hearing about the attack; victims describe feelings of disbelief as scenes of mayhem and horror engulfed them.   Yet this attack also surpassed others in terms of numbers killed and injured.  We'll take your questions and comments as details of this latest mass shooting continue to emerge. 


Weekly N.H. News Roundup: September 29, 2017

Sep 30, 2017

 

Risk, Decisions, and Death in the Presidentials

Sep 28, 2017
(Photo Matty Bowman)

N.H.'s beautiful Presidential Range attracts hikers in all seasons. Mt. Washington holds the dubious distinction of having “the world’s worst weather” yet hikers and climbers are attracted year-round to the challenging terrain.  It's also been the scene of  hundreds of accidents, including the one that took the life of Kate Matrosova in 2015.  We examine Matrosova's story and the lessons learned about risk-taking and decision-making.


Pexels

The research keeps piling up about concussions and contact sports, especially football, and some parents are reconsidering whether to let their kids play the game.  We discuss the latest research and its ramifications for parents, athletes and athletic trainers. Plus, current thinking on the recovery process, and how schools are assessing whether students are ready to return to play - or to the classroom.


What's The Story Behind New Hampshire's Stone Walls?

Sep 26, 2017
Edith W. Currier

Robert Frost famously said “good fences make good neighbors” and if you’re out for a walk in the woods in New Hampshire, you will likely find a stone wall.  We talk with Kevin Gardner, a master stone builder and author of several books on the subject, about the on-going appeal of stone walls and how to build them.  He explains the philosophy behind the craft of placing stone and examines the mythology of the stone wall and its place in the New England imagination.

Credit Johannes Thiel via Flickr cc

New Hampshire schools and communities have been doing some serious soul searching after reports of racist incidents in which children were allegedly harassed verbally and physically, resulting in neck injuries for one boy.

Right now, many are in response mode.

What are the best strategies in school settings for addressing racial tension or preventing it from happening in the first place? 


Weekly N.H. News Roundup: September 22, 2017

Sep 22, 2017

The Graham-Cassidy healthcare proposal receives mixed response in the Granite State. Community college officials are grilled by New Hampshire lawmakers concerned about a recent audit.  And V.A. whistle blowers raise concerns about continued problems at the facility.


As overdoses and deaths continue, New Hampshire physicians are responding to criticism that they've overprescribed. Now, some patients with chronic pain find themselves cut off from access to medications, left without other treatment options, and feeling that the anti-opioid push has gone overboard.


On this episode: The lottery game keno heads to individual cities for approval by voters. Supporters hope it will boost local economies, while critics worry about gambling. And later in the show, Senator Jeb Bradley updates us on efforts to improve Medicaid Expansion. 


The organ donation system is complex, and often misunderstood -  with a waiting list that is long, and constantly shifting. But living donations, high-risk donors, and new scientific developments in tissue growth are making new strides in addressing the need.

This show originally aired on April 17, 2017. 

An Artist's Roundtable

Sep 18, 2017

What does it take to "make it" as an artist in New Hampshire?  Without big-city galleries and crowds of well-heeled patrons, we find out how Granite State artists innovate, especially with social media transforming artistic outreach.  We also explore how our education system views the arts, when the STEM fields, science, technology, engineering and math, get top billing.     

The show originally aired on August 22, 2017. 

Weekly N.H. News Roundup: September 15, 2017

Sep 15, 2017

It's not primary season, but voting issues are top of mind in New Hampshire lately with the Presidential Commission on Election Integrity meeting in Manchester this week.  The voting law known as SB3 faces  its first test in a special election in Belknap County.  And Claremont grapples with race-based tension after a report of an alleged lynching attack on an eight-year-old biracial boy.  

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

It's not primary season, but voting is top of mind in New Hampshire these days.

With the passage of the controversial new voting law SB 3 and its first test in the courts and at the polls earlier this week, Granite State voters are split on whether or not the law is necessary, or simply a tactic to suppress students (and others) from casting ballots.

As that story continues to develop, Secretary of State Bill Gardner's participation on President Trump's election commission continues to generate controversy. That group met in New Hampshire this week amid protest from activists and pushback over new, unfounded claims of voter fraud in the state during the 2016 election.

What's Happening With The Northern Pass Project?

Sep 13, 2017
NorthernPass.us

The decision on the hydro-electric transmission project, which would bring power from Canada to New England, has been postponed yet again. We review the goals of this $1.6 billion proposal and examine how the debate around it has changed since it was first presented in 2010.


E. Grimm

 A school bus driver shortage in New Hampshire, and nationally, is making it difficult for some kids to get to school. It's forced the Northwood district to struggle with the start of the school day, and the town of Wakefield to delay school for two weeks.  Then there's the question of when that first day should be: Governor Sununu set off a statewide debate recently, saying he thinks the first day of school should be after Labor Day - we examine that issue as well.   

 

U.S. Army Europe

A month after the attacks on Sept. 11, President Bush authorized strikes against Al Qaeda terrorist training camps and military installations of the Taliban regime in Afghanistan.  Those limited attacks have since grown into an enormous commitment, amounting to thousands of American lives and billions of dollars. Meanwhile, President Trump recently renewed American involvement there, vowing victory. 

Weekly N.H. News Roundup: September 8, 2017

Sep 8, 2017

President Trump’s decision to end the DACA immigration policy could affect as many as one thousand people in New Hampshire.  ICE orders deportation for Indonesian immigrants in New Hampshire.  Manchester became the first community to sue opioid manufacturers and distributors - seeking to recoup money spent battling opioid addiction.  And Portsmouth says no to Keno, as Rochester puts it on the ballot. 


A new book by Concord native Benjamin Rachlin, Ghost of the Innocent Man, tells a story of wrongful conviction and exoneration. We learn about the saga of Willie Grimes, imprisoned for 24 years for a rape he did not commit, and his legal fight for freedom.  Rachlin says it's one of many similar cases in recent years, thanks to expanded use of DNA evidence.  

GUEST:  Benjamin Rachlin, author of Ghost of the Innocent Man

Benjamin Rachlin will discuss Ghost of the Innocent Man at Gibson's Bookstore in Concord on Thursday, Sept. 7 at 5:30 p.m.


Doctors Increasingly Seek a Cure for Burnout

Sep 5, 2017
Wall Boat via Flickr/CC

While the role of a physician has always been demanding - there's a spike now in doctors who say they're overwhelmed, and spending more time in front of computers than tending to patients. That's contributing to a burnout epidemic, leading to high turnover, early retirement, and greater malpractice risk. We'll find out how doctors in New Hampshire are coping. 


Economist and Harvard professor Mihir Desai uses philosophy, film, literature, and history to analyze finance as an institution built on morality and humanity. His book , The Wisdom of Finance, explores how the financial industry can be understood through culture, and how deeply finance impacts our personal lives. 

This show originally aired on July 25, 2017. 

A Week of Summer Favorites on The Exchange

Aug 30, 2017
woodleywonderworks / Flickr

As we enjoy the last days of summer and gear up for the school year, we bring you a week of summer favorites. We hear our earlier conversation about New Hampshire lakes, taking a deep dive into how policies are keeping Granite State lakes healthy and swimmable. Plus we take a look back at our programs on what teens have been reading this summer, the economic impact of the craft beer boom, and our program updating the health of two beloved New Hampshire species, loons and moose.  

Scott Heron; Flickr

What couldn't have a Week of Summer Favorites without including moose and loons!  For many Granite Staters, these creatures symbolize what makes our wild places special, but both face threats that are reducing their numbers. We'll discuss these threats, and ongoing efforts to support these two beloved N.H. animals.

This show originally aired on August 1, 2017. 

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