The Exchange

New Hampshire is now tied for the second oldest population in the country and beginning to see the pressure on healthcare, services, and housing caused by the "silver tsunami."  In his new book,"The Longevity Economy,"  author Joseph Coughlin says the future is both older and "technologically-enabled." He makes the case for rethinking aging and retirement not as a burden, but as an economic catalyst that could transform business and society.

Tracy Lee Carroll/NHPR

This week, Granite Staters are meeting, many in blizzard conditions, to hash out their town's budgets and priorities -- either in the traditional town meeting form, when voting and discussion take place on the same day, or as part of a newer form of town government, known as SB2, which involves a deliberative session and a separate day for voting.  We're sitting down with four seasoned town moderators to discuss how local government is working nowadays in their towns.  


In the southern region of New Hampshire and on the Seacoast, vacancy rates are low, housing prices are high, and there is a lack of affordable housing for families and young adults. In the northern and western parts of the state, substandard housing remains a problem. As part of the The Balance series on NHPR about the cost of living in the Granite State, we look at why our state continues to have issues, and how some cities, like Londonderry, are turning to mixed community developments. 

To celebrate 20 years of Something Wild on NHPR, we take a look at how New Hampshire has changed in terms of nature and ecology over the two decades the program has been on the air.  

Weekly N.H. News Roundup: March 9, 2018

Mar 9, 2018

As next Tuesday’s town meeting day approaches, the N.H. Senate sides with the Secretary of State over who has the power to reschedule town meetings.  The state House of Representatives vote to send to the Senate a bill adding gender identity to existing state anti-discrimination laws. The Executive Council unanimously approves $600,000 for Manchester-based Hope for New Hampshire Recovery.

Meg Kelly; NPR

NPR's senior editor and correspondent for the Washington Desk, Ron Elving, joins us to talk about the biggest news in our nation's capital this week, including President Trump's trade announcements, the resignation of the President's top economic advisor, Gary Cohn, and more. 

Offshore Drilling Debate Revived In New England

Mar 7, 2018

A public hearing earlier this week attracted environmentalists, fishing groups, and many others who oppose President Trump's new proposal to expand offshore drilling in the Atlantic, including off the coast of Maine and New Hampshire. We talk with NHPR's energy and environmental reporter Annie Ropeik about the latest developments and what impact offshore drilling might have for the state. 

In recent years, unreliable snow cover and wild temperature swings have caused headaches for our winter recreation industry, and all those who love to ski, ice-fish, or snowmobile.  But the impacts go beyond disappointment: there are animal and forest health affects as well, including the beloved Sugar maple. 

DACA, or "Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals" has been in the news a lot recently, and for the past half year, Congress and the White House have gone back-and-forth over the fate of the Dreamers, debating what to do about their special but temporary immigration status.  We take a regional look at this issue, both political and personal.

Weekly N.H. News Roundup: March 2, 2018

Mar 1, 2018

A former St. Paul's teacher who has taught at the Derryfield School since 2009 is arrested and charged in connection with the AG's investigation of St. Paul's  handling of allegations of sexual misconduct. A Democrat wins a special election in Laconia, the fifth House seat to flip from Republican to Democrat since President's Trump's election.   And the CD1 race gets a bit more crowded, with Democrat Levi Sanders, son of U.S. Senator Bernie Sanders, announcing he's running.  

As one of only two states with neither an income tax nor a sales tax, the Granite State funds local and state services in other ways. As part of NHRP's cost of living series, The Balance, we answer your questions about how our unusual system works. 

This program originally aired on February 6, 2018. 

Some malls are struggling to survive, along with their "anchor" department stores. But Americans still want to shop: they're just doing it differently: on-line, downtown, certain big-box stores, outlet centers, and mixed-use developments.  We examine these retails trends here in New Hampshire.

Breaking It Down: The Business of Composting in N.H.

Feb 26, 2018
Britta Greene / NHPR

Unless you're a backyard composter, your food scraps are going to a landfill, where they take up a surprisingly large percentage of increasingly valuable space - and contribute to the release of methane gas. We look at why New Hampshire lags behind its neighbors in recycling food waste, and learn about some businesses that see food waste as an economic opportunity. 

How School Shootings Are Changing Education

Feb 23, 2018

We look at how school shootings is impacting students, teachers, and school communities, after the shooting in Parkland, FL.

Weekly N.H. News Roundup: February 23, 2018

Feb 22, 2018

After the Parkland Florida school shooting, police respond to a number of threats at high schools in New Hampshire, and the House of Representatives votes down a bill would have allowed firearms on state college campuses.  Senate Republicans propose a bill to reauthorize Medicaid expansion for another five years.  And a bill to raise the minimum marriage age in New Hampshire to 16 years of age is headed for a full House vote. 

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

In his State of the State address last week, Governor Sununu declared: Life is better in New Hampshire than it was a year ago. On his list of achievements: fewer regulations, lower taxes, and school choice.  On his to-do list: A ten-year plan for the state's mental health system and a revamped Medicaid expansion program.  

Wonderlane; Flickr

In New Hampshire, visitors to some emergency rooms have received shockingly high bills after treatment, often involving charges for out-of-network doctors, who provided care at hospitals that were part of their insurance plans.  Wednesday morning at 9, The Exchange takes a closer look at this "balance-billing." 

We'll look at the President's new budget proposal and how it may impact Granite Staters, and discuss what the recent closure of several labor and delivery units at local hospitals means for our healthcare sector in New Hampshire. 

What Are Your Questions for Governor Chris Sununu?

Feb 19, 2018
Allegra Boverman for NHPR

This Thursday, Feb. 22, The Exchange follows up with Governor Chris Sununu on his State of the State address and on news affecting Granite Staters.  Email your questions and comments for the Governor to Or you can leave us a voicemail ahead of the show, with your first name, at 603-513-7797. We may use your comment or question on the air. Tune in Thursday morning, live at 9. And thanks.

With the release of Steven Spielberg's movie, The Post, we look back at the battle between the Post and the Nixon Administration over the Pentagon Papers, a secret government study about the Vietnam War that revealed the government’s lies about U.S. involvement in the conflict. The movie focuses on Katharine Graham's role as publisher of the Washington Post, as well as the constant balance between keeping government secrets classified and the need for transparency in government.

Weekly N.H. News Roundup: February 16, 2018

Feb 15, 2018

We parse the Governor's State of the State address for what it might tell us about his agenda for the state in 2018.  EPA chief Scott Pruitt jets into New Hampshire to meet privately about water contamination.  NHPR's Todd Bookman  unpacks allegations made against the NH Liquor Commission. And we follow up on the court battle over the lottery ticket that's been called the "most valuable piece of paper on Earth."  


N.H. Mayors On The State of Their Cities

Feb 14, 2018
AlexiusHoratius/wikimedia commons

In advance of Governor Sununu's State of the State address, we check in with four mayors on how their communities are faring: on education, the local economy, and the addiction crisis. And we ask what they'd like to hear from the Governor.

We Love Winter: Backcountry Skiing & Ice Climbing

Feb 14, 2018
Photo by Andrew Drummond

With the Winter Olympics in full swing, we look at some thrilling winter sports in N.H.  An increasing number of people want to get outside in winter, and many say part of the fun of skiing down is climbing up snowy trails and mountains, or even scaling icy cliffs.  Have you tried backcountry skiing or ice-climbing?  We learn how to safely get started in these growing winter sports, what equipment is needed, and where it can be done.  

Kai Schreiber; Flickr

It's the time of year when students and their families navigate financial decisions, and the loans, grants, and bills associated. We ask how the rising cost of higher education and increased focus on student loan debt is changing the conversation, and we'll get an update on federal policy.  

We talk with Congresswoman Ann McLane Kuster about the efforts of the Bipartisan Heroin Task Force to increase funding to fight the opioid epidemic.  The new federal budget deal passed last week includes $6 billion in funding for opioid abuse and mental health treatment.  We discuss how much N.H. might receive, who decides, and how it would be spent.

Addiction in the Workplace

Feb 11, 2018

In the midst of a drug crisis, New Hampshire is also dealing with a severe labor shortage.  So now, some employers and the state hope to creatively address where the two overlap, promoting so-called "recovery friendly workplaces".  We look at the practical, legal, and financial aspects of this. 

Weekly N.H. News Roundup: February 9, 2018

Feb 8, 2018

A  New Hampshire woman won $560 million in the Powerball lottery, and now she is fighting in court to stay anonymous.  Governor Sununu nominates Robert J. Lynn for Chief Justice of the State Supreme Court.  The wife of the state education commissioner urges lawmakers to oppose a bill that would ban gay conversion therapy. F or the first time in nearly a decade, New Hampshire legislators are debating seat belt requirements.  And we'll see plenty of Olympic hopefuls from New Hampshire as the Winter Olympics get underway in South Korea. 


Marsy's Law is a nationwide effort to bolster the rights of crime victims.  Now there is a bill in the New Hampshire legislature to put these rights into the constitution.  It  has bipartisan support, and the Governor's endorsement, but there are concerns about possible unintended consequences, and some hesitation over constitutional change.

This program will air on Thursday,  January 8 at 9 a.m., and will be rebroadcast again at 7 p.m. Audio of the discussion will be available after the show. 

Ellen Grimm for NHPR

  Marsy's Law is a nationwide effort to bolster the rights of crime victims.  Now, a New Hampshire bill to put these rights into the state Constitution has bipartisan support and the Governor's endorsement.  But there are concerns about possible unintended consequences and some hesitation over constitutional change. 

N.H. Medicaid Update

Feb 7, 2018

We learn the latest about new Medicaid guidelines released by the Trump Administration, in which states, including New Hampshire, will now be allowed to impose work requirements on some recipients of Medicaid. State lawmakers are currently debating whether to extend the Medicaid expansion program beyond the end of 2018, when it is due to sunset.