The Exchange

Alan L. MacRae

Last week, The Exchange went to the historic Belknap Mill in Laconia to talk to a live audience about what it takes to make New Hampshire's old buildings relevant and useful for today.   

This show was taped at a live event on Friday, May 11. The broadcast version of this conversation will air  at 9 a.m. on Wednesday, May 16th, and again at 7 p.m.

NASA

Our Astronomy crew is back, with insight into the latest development speculating about icy plumes of water on Jupiter's moon, Europa.  And, eyes on Mars: NASA's Insight Mars Lander just launched a mission to study the planet's interior. In 2020, NASA will attempt to fly a tiny helicopter drone in the thin Martian atmosphere.  SpaceX is on track to launch more rockets than any other country...and may soon begin testing short trips to Mars next year.  Amid all this speculation: could the first man on Mars...be a woman? 

Welcome to Adulthood, High School Graduates!

May 11, 2018

High school commencement ceremonies mark the passage to adulthood as much as turning 18 years old does.  The New Hampshire Bar Association has published it's guidebook to becoming an adult, "Beyond High School," for 20 years.  "Beyond High School" describes the rights of young adults, as well as the responsibilities.  The publication is distributed by N.H. lawyers and judges to high school seniors each Law Day (May 1) and covers issues like establishing credit and renting an apartment as well as legal issues, like what to do if you're arrested.

To learn more about the book Beyond High School and to find out how you can get a copy, contact the N.H. Bar Association here.

Weekly N.H. News Roundup: May 11, 2018

May 10, 2018

The state's new Child Advocate launches an investigation into the Sununu Youth Center following allegations of a pattern of illegal use of restraints on juveniles there.  For the third time this year, the New Hampshire House of Representatives votes against a bill to create education savings accounts. Voting laws and Medicaid expansion are on the governor's desk to be signed into law.  And it's that time of year - bears are out, looking for easy pickings at your bird-feeder...even in Manchester.

WATCH THE SHOW:

Two documentaries, Intelligent Lives, and a companion film about New Hampshire native Garrett Shows (forthcoming in the fall), challenge our perception of people with intellectual disabilities, which resulted in systemic segregation and limited them from participating fully in school, work and society.  We talk with those who created these films, and those whose stories, struggles and triumphs are portrayed.

Will N.H. Repeal the Death Penalty?

May 8, 2018
California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, via Wikimedia Commons

For the first time since 2000, state lawmakers are sending a bill repealing the death penalty to the governor's desk, despite his vow to veto it.  We examine the arguments on both sides, recap the history of the death penalty in N.H., and look at how a repeal might affect the state's sole inmate on death row, Michael Addison.  

GUESTS:

Alumni Sue St. Paul's School Alleging Sex Abuse

May 8, 2018
St. Paul's School

We look at a lawsuit brought by two alumni against St. Paul’s School, saying the school failed to protect them from sexual abuse by faculty members in the 1960s and 70s. Their lawsuit calls the Concord prep school a “haven for sexual predators” that has failed to protect children for decades.  We also examine a recent agreement between the private school and the Concord Police Department about reporting sexual assault.

N.H. Debates Changes to Animal Cruelty Laws

May 7, 2018
Meredith Lee, Humane Society of the U.S.

After several cases revealed animals found in squalid conditions in recent years, the state legislature set about tightening laws. However, the Senate and House have come up with vastly different versions. We'll hear the arguments behind each, and whether there's room for compromise. 

US Dept of Agriculture

As the school year winds down, many parents are having to "wind up," making plans to care for, and entertain, their children during the long weeks of vacation.  We talk with two Granite State parents, who write about parenting, about navigating the sometimes steep price of summer.

Weekly N.H. News Roundup: May 4, 2018

May 4, 2018

Statehouse lawmakers make decisions on a number of contentious issues, including Medicaid Expansion, education freedom accounts, voting eligibility, transgender rights, and marriage age.  The House-passed version of an animal cruelty bill conflicts with the Senate version - compromise is necessary, but is it likely?  And two more candidates enter the crowded race for Congress in the first congressional district.

The Marshall Plan: Dawn Of The Cold War

May 2, 2018
U.S. Embassy The Hague

A recent book by Benn Steil re-examines this massive effort to revive post-World War II Europe and thwart the influence of the Soviet Union, seen as the next ideological threat on the world stage.  The author explores how echoes of those struggles are heard in today's debates, including how best to handle Russia.

New Hampshire has high electricity rates, a major nuclear power plant, and has been in a years-long battle over hydropower development. How do these factors impact energy policy in the Granite State? We look at the state's newly updated energy plan, which prioritizes lowering rates, and has less to say about mass transit and renewable energy.

"Ninety Percent Mental" - that's what Yogi Berra said about baseball, and it's also the title of former Major League pitcher Bob Tewksbury's new book.  After years in "the show" Tewksbury is now part of the growing trend in baseball focusing on psychological strategies to maximize performance.  Yogi Berra's quote continued with "the other half is physical" and Tewksbury will also reminisce about some of the game-changing characters from his time on the mound. 

Human Trafficking in New Hampshire

Apr 27, 2018
DARPA graphic

Human trafficking is on the rise in New Hampshire as part of a larger trend across New England. This is due, in part, to the opioid crisis, as drug users and addicts may be at higher risk for becoming victims of trafficking crimes. 

Weekly N.H. News Roundup: April 27, 2018

Apr 27, 2018

The New Hampshire legislature approves a bill to repeal the state’s death penalty, sending the measure to the governor despite his vow to veto it.  A bill re-defining “domicile” for voting purposes is headed for an up or down vote in the Senate.  Debates on Family Medical Leave and school choice may be over...for now.  And four state employees unions may finally have a contract. 

All these stories and more on the Weekly NH News Roundup.

In the southern region of New Hampshire and on the Seacoast, vacancy rates are low, housing prices are high, and there is a lack of affordable housing for families and young adults. In the northern and western parts of the state, substandard housing remains a problem. As part of the The Balance series on NHPR about the cost of living in the Granite State, we look at why our state continues to have issues, and how some cities, like Londonderry, are turning to mixed community developments. 

This program will air on Thursday, April 26 at 9 a.m., and will be rebroadcast again at 7 p.m.  It was originally broadcast on March 13.

wikimedia commons

This smoking alternative is sweeping schools nationwide and causing concern.  JUULs are small and easy to hide; they look like a flash drive and come in delicious-smelling flavors.  But manufacturers say their product is squarely aimed at adult smokers, to help them quit.  We look at the arguments. 

City of Laconia

While Statehouse politics draw headlines, it's the day-to-day decisions at the city and town level that can have a bigger impact on our lives: from housing to education to the opioid crisis.  We sit down with a panel of local leaders, about the challenges and rewards of their jobs - and what they'd like to see from the state. 

When Alzheimer's Strikes Young

Apr 20, 2018

A recent Concord Monitor series, "Stolen Memories," profiles several Granite Staters who were diagnosed with younger-onset Alzheimer's, some in their early fifties.  We'll hear their stories and learn about their particular struggles with work, family, and the medical system. 

Weekly N.H. News Roundup: April 20, 2018

Apr 20, 2018

Legislators find the state may be on the hook to pay a lot more money to hospitals for people with no insurance or for those on Medicaid.  A proposed constitutional amendment that would give crime victims more rights gets hung up in a House committee.  And the state emphasizes cost and competition in its new energy plan. 

Jessica Hunt / NHPR

Jeffrey Meyers, Commissioner of the N.H. Department of Health and Human Services, says his agency is beefing up oversight of substance use disorder treatment centers that have been struggling to stay afloat or that have closed altogether after financial struggles – a situation the state can ill afford in the midst of the opioid crisis.  

Speaking on The Exchange, Meyers said the state is auditing these organizations regularly.

The Future of Recycling with Outside/In

Apr 18, 2018
Kristian Bjornard; Flickr

Many towns across New Hampshire have adopted single-stream recycling... toss everything together, and it will be sorted out down the line. But a recent episode of NHPR's Outside/In found that this method of collection is becoming less sustainable and less profitable. We look at how this is impacting the Granite State.

Listen to the full episode of Outside/In: "One Bin To Rule Them All."

NHPR

Jeffrey Meyers, Commissioner of the Dept. of Health and Human Services oversees some of the state's most challenging issues: the opioid crisis and a struggling treatment network, a child protection system with high caseloads and under scrutiny, and a Medicaid expansion program under review.

Facebook's Data Scandal and You

Apr 16, 2018

For years, Facebook has collected personal information in order to direct advertising to consumers. But a recent scandal with political consulting firm Cambridge Analytica, which was able to collect this data, has raised huge concerns and a Congressional inquiry. 

N.H. Beaches Face Threat from Microplastics

Apr 16, 2018

New Hampshire beaches may look generally clean, but there's a big threat posed by tiny microplastics. Microplastics are defined as plastics between 1-5mm in size. They may be fragments of degraded larger plastic debris, synthetic fibers, or microbeads from cosmetics and toothpaste. We learn about research studying the prevalence of this microscopic debris on New Hampshire beaches, the threat it poses to marine ecosystems, and what we can do about it. 

Weekly N.H. News Roundup: April 13, 2018

Apr 13, 2018

We look at the impact Paul Ryan's retirement may have, if any, on congressional races in New Hampshire. Former Democratic State Senator Molly Kelly decides to run for governor.  Debates over voting laws and victims' rights draw crowds at the statehouse.

Author Debby Irving's memoir, "Waking Up White" serves as inspiration for New Hampshire's Oyster River community, as it reflects on tough questions about race and tolerance.  The discussions come after incidents revealing discrimination and racism, in an area where many believed they had the best intentions.  We examine how a state like New Hampshire, that is mostly white, fits into the national narrative of racial strife, now and in the past.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

We talk with Republican and Democratic lawmakers about some major votes coming up at the Statehouse this session, including Medicaid expansion, now in the House;  a family and medical leave bill, under scrutiny in the senate; and a proposed Constitutional amendment on victims' rights, called Marsy's Law.

David Folkenflik joins us as part of our Justice & Journalism series with UNH Law School. We talk about the vast changes in journalism he's seen in recent years, from the impact of social media, to "fake news," to covering the #MeToo movement, including at NPR. 

Christiaan Colen; Flickr

Recent ransomware attacks in Atlanta and elsewhere in the country have cities, and businesses, rethinking their network security. And blockchain, a secure method of processing cryptocurrency, is getting a lot of buzz. What is it, who should use it, and why? 

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