The Exchange

Great Bay National Estuarine Reserve

An estuary is where freshwater rivers meet the ocean, making up a fragile yet vital eco-system for wildlife, fish, and people.  Now a new report on the Great Bay and Hampton-Seabrook Estuaries shows continuing trouble for this region, and introduces comprehensive strategies for keeping the area healthy. 

This show will air at 9 a.m. on Monday, December 18th, and then again at 7 p.m.

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Weekly N.H. News Roundup: December 15, 2017

13 hours ago

Governor Chris Sununu appears to oppose a GOP-backed bill that would redefine what it means to be a voter in New Hampshire. The ACLU says U.S. Border Patrol checkpoints on I-93 that led to drug charges for 18 American citizens this summer violated the state’s constitution.  And  Wolfeboro's Great Dane breeder is found guilty of animal cruelty.

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Canada Concerned Over U.S. Tone in NAFTA Talks

Dec 14, 2017

In the nearly quarter century since NAFTA was enacted, trade has tripled among the three partners of the North American Free Trade Agreement: U.S., Mexico, and Canada.  And bilateral trade between Canada and New England has reached nearly $11 billion.

That’s according to David Alward, Boston-based Consul General of Canada, who joined The Exchange to discuss the impact of NAFTA on the region and the status of NAFTA meetings now underway in Washington.  The sixth round of talks will take place in Montreal in January.   

The Single-Payer Healthcare Debate Revisited

Dec 13, 2017
Reese Brown; U.S. Army

With uncertainty over the Affordable Care Act's future, and Congressional inaction on an alternative, some lawmakers in D.C. and New Hampshire are re-branding an old idea: government-financed universal healthcare.  We look at the pros and cons from a medical and budgetary perspective.

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What's Next for NAFTA?

Dec 12, 2017
Wikimedia Commons

The Trump Administration has been critical of the North American Free Trade Agreement, at times even threatening to pull out.  Now, with re-negotiations underway more than 20 years after NAFTA came into effect,  we check in on what its impact has been, including on New Hampshire.  

A new, national study has alarming predictions for New Hampshire. The report draws a strong connection between substance abuse and suicide, and says the Granite State will have among the country's highest suicide risks in the upcoming decade.  We get more details, also local reaction to this report, and ideas for mitigating this possibility.


Holiday Book Show 2017

Dec 8, 2017

Our popular holiday tradition takes place on Monday, December 11, with Dan Chartrand, owner of Water Street Bookstore in Exeter and Michael Herrmann, owner of Gibson's Bookstore in Concord.  We look at the top books of 2017 and discuss best books for gift-giving...and receiving.  And scroll down to click on the photos below for a look at what some NHPR folks are hoping for this year!


Weekly N.H. News Roundup: December 8, 2017

Dec 8, 2017

New Hampshire becomes the first state to opt out of FirstNet, a federal program designed to help first responders better communicate across the country.  Hillary Clinton returns to New Hampshire to sign copies of her book, and attracts protests and ponies as well as fans.  Eversource prepares to switch on its first major new power line in New Hampshire in 20 years.  And the Rockingham County attorney’s office releases more than 900 pages of the state’s investigation into Phillips Exeter Academy. 

Creditworthy: A History of Consumer Surveillance and Financial Identity in America

American consumers are used to being part of a vast high-tech credit world that tracks financial identities and creditworthiness using sophisticated algorithms.  The roots of this system reach back to the 19th century, when credit clerks kept detailed handwritten notes and "correspondents" reported on the character of local business owners to try to help lenders determine who was more likely to repay debts.  

In his new book, Creditworthy, Josh Lauer, UNH associate professor of media studies, tells the story of how personal identity became financial identity and how credit management companies with relatively modest ambitions evolved into today's huge consumer data industry, which tracks all manner of personal information, with little oversight.  


NHPR Flickr

As we head into a midterm election year, Dean Spiliotes, civic scholar in the School of Arts and Sciences at SNHU and author of the website NH Political Capital, talks with political analysts from around the state about the current political mood in the state, and public opinion on a variety of issues. We also check in with midterm elections, and the shifting leadership in the state legislature. 

Ben Stephenson via Flickr/CC

Small New England colleges are competing for a shrinking number of students in the area. Some have prepared for this slowdown, which primarily has affected the Northeast and Midwest, but many have not. According to the Chronicle of Higher Education, more than 40 percent of small private colleges missed their enrollment or tuition revenue goals in 2016.  

In New Hampshire,  Keene State College recently announced it will offer buyouts to faculty and staff to deal with declining enrollment and a tuition shortfall.  Last year, Colby-Sawyer College announced plans to drop its English and Philosophy programs to help address a budget gap and focus on more popular programs, such as nursing and business.    

We talk with top college officials about how their institutions are faring and what steps they've taken -- or plan to take -- to address some of these challenges. 


Changes To Net Neutrality Laws On The Table, Again

Dec 1, 2017

Next week, the Federal Communications Commission will vote on a proposal to reverse current rules governing internet service providers like Comcast or Verizon.  We examine what it might mean for those who create on-line content, those who distribute it, and customers seeking information and entertainment.


Weekly N.H. News Roundup: December 1, 2017

Dec 1, 2017

We find out who will pick up the gavel as the new Speaker of the New Hampshire House.  An amendment to a bill raises the bar for voting, from domiciled to resident, setting up more battles over voter eligibility.  And Keene State college, struggling with declining enrollment, offers buyouts to faculty and staff.  

GUESTS:

Pexels

The research keeps piling up about concussions and contact sports, especially football, and some parents are reconsidering whether to let their kids play the game.  We discuss the latest research and its ramifications for parents, athletes and athletic trainers. Plus, current thinking on the recovery process, and how schools are assessing whether students are ready to return to play - or to the classroom.

This program was originally broadcast on Sept. 27, 2017.

NHPR

Sam Evans-Brown, host of Outside/In, the NHPR podcast about the natural world and how we use it, discusses the podcast's latest series, Powerline. We hear about how the development of the world's fourth-largest hydropower producer, Hydro-Québec, impacted French Canadians, and the indigenous people of Québec...also, how this hydropower company is connected to a controversial power project in New Hampshire, Northern Pass.


An Update On Special Education In New Hampshire

Nov 27, 2017

New models for education seek to provide resources and access to services for not just students with special needs (such as intellectual disabilities or learning disabilities), but for any student who may be marginalized in their  community. This may include students who speak English as a second language, and students living in poverty. But individual schools and school districts still struggle to meet their students' needs, through workforce shortages, funding limitations, or exhaustive performance requirements. 


With the holiday season upon us, we look at the outlook for N.H. retailers, as some venture into online sales; meanwhile there's also something of a retail reversal underway -- as some mega online companies go brick-and-mortar. Also, as consumer debt reaches new highs, some worry another borrowing bubble could be in the cards. And: Is the Granite State economy going strong or getting weaker?


Watch Out, Kale: Why Seaweed Is The New Superfood

Nov 23, 2017

The Gulf of Maine is home to some of the world’s most beautiful and versatile seaweeds, also known as sea vegetables, ocean herbs, or marine macroalgae.  We discuss what's fueling the increasing demand for this latest superfood; it's turning up in some surprising places - from sophisticated restaurants to craft breweries.  We learn the basics of foraging for seaweeds for use in home cooking, as well as efforts to develop a market for sustainably farmed seaweeds.  

This show was originally broadcast on October 12, 2017.

 

While dog-or-cat lovers will eagerly describe their pets' adorable habits, biologist and author John Shivik says it's not just pets, but reptiles, fish, even insects have unique personalities and behaviors. We find out more, why it matters, and what it tells us about ourselves.


Garry Knight; Flickr

As we head into Thanksgiving, difficult topics are bound to come up around the dinner table.  We hear about a new effort in Nashua called 1000 Conversations, which is aimed at getting people to talk outside of their own cultural groups.  Those involved say this kind of dialogue has wide-ranging benefits.

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Does Competency-Based Education Make the Grade?

Nov 17, 2017
Pixabay

A decade ago, the state board of education required local districts to adopt this approach, and since then, districts have been making the switch.  We'll find out what competency-based education really means....how it's working at the classroom level....and whether it's living up to promises made. 


Weekly N.H. News Roundup: November 17, 2017

Nov 17, 2017

A 10-9 vote from the House Education Committee on a school choice bill means it moves ahead. But a one-vote margin approving Keno in Rochester  leads to a recount. And a county prosecutor defends her decision not to bring criminal charges against two deans at Phillips Exeter Academy for their handling of an alleged sexual assault. 

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N.H. Mulls Over Marijuana Legalization

Nov 15, 2017
Seattle City Council via Flickr/CC

The cause of marijuana legalization in New Hampshire hit a road block this week -- but not a dead end. A House committee has voted against legalizing marijuana but a special commission will continue to explore the idea, weighing various aspects of legalization through December of 2018, when it presents a final report.

Read our story on this show:  Debate Continues Over Marijuana Legalization in New Hampshire

For the most American holiday, steeped in tradition, a new book on "The Mayflower: The Families, The Voyage and The Founding of America."  British historian Rebecca Fraser focuses on Edward Winslow, who she calls the most important, but least remembered, of the group of separatists known as the Pilgrims.  We discuss the challenges they faced in England and in the New World, as well as the role of women and their changing relationship with the Native Americans.   

Getty Images | NPR

After mass shootings, mental health professionals find themselves at pains to explain that people with mental illness are more likely to be victims of violence than aggressors.

And they’re more likely to die by suicide than to harm others.

That’s again been part of the conversation after the Texas church shooting in which 26 people died, and the shooter, by several accounts, dealt with some form of mental illness or instability, including erratic, violent behavior.

Sara Plourde for NHPR

As the state transitions from ATV season to snowmobile season, off-highway recreational vehicles (OHRVs) are hugely popular and have a nearly year-round presence in parts of New Hampshire. We follow up with NHPR's Off-Road series by Casey McDermott and Todd Bookman by looking at their safety record, and the economic and environmental impact of this sporting culture.


Alan Cleaver via Flickr/CC

In the Texas church shooting the perpetrator did have a history of mental health problems and violent behavior. But mental health professionals warn such incidents are complex, people with mental illness are far more likely to be victims, and other factors are more predictive of extreme violence.

Read our story on this show:  In Wake of Texas Massacre, Calls For Closer Look at Link Between Mass Shootings and Suicide.

GUESTS:

Jack Mallory

For many Americans, the Vietnam War is a long, complex, and oft-misunderstood chapter of American history. But the recent ten-part documentary by filmmakers Ken Burns and Lynn Novak stirred up a national discussion about Vietnam. We speak with four veterans of the war about the documentary, and their own experiences. 

(Scroll down to read the story of Natt King, another New Hampshire veteran who shared his story off the air.)

  This show was originally broadcast on Oct. 17, 2017.

Allegra Boverman; NHPR

For two decades, Peter Overby  has examined lobbying, campaign finance, and recently, special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation into Russian interference in our elections.  Overby will also shed some light on the rise of so-called "dark" political money.


Following the Broad-winged Hawk Migration - By Bike

Nov 7, 2017

On September 6th, 2016, Eric Masterson climbed on his bike in Hancock, N.H., to follow the broad-winged hawk migration to South America.  We hear about his adventure and what he learned as he biked across five time zones, 40 degrees of latitude, and 5,000 miles in pursuit of the birds. We also find out about bird population numbers from hawk watch sites around the state.


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