Tourism

edbrambley via Flickr CC

Studying medicine requires intelligence, discipline and considerable expense, making it one of the most prestigious professions in America. But that wasn’t always the case.  We take a look into the shady practices that lead the people of New York City to riot against doctors in the eighteenth-century. Then, for many people vacation is all about fun, sun, and relaxation…for others it’s about Kevlar vests and the front lines. We’ll take a look at the latest in adventure travel: war tourism. Plus, we speak with New Orleans musician Glen David Andrews about his newest album.

Listen to the full show and Read more for individual segments.


jbspec7 via Flickr CC

New Hampshire is often advertised as a state filled with natural attractions, famous for our mountains (Mt. Washington and Mt. Monadnock are both known world-wide), lakes, and rivers. But the state is filled with historical landmarks as well, which Lucie Bryar covers in her book Exploring Southern New Hampshire: History and Nature on Back Roads and Quiet Waters. Here are some of the cultural attractions in southern NH you may not have heard about, but that you’ll definitely want to check out.

American Flag
Brandi Korte / Flickr Creative Commons

 

An organization that studies New Hampshire tourism says an estimated 880,000 out-of-state visitors are expected for the July 4th holiday weekend and they are expected to spend about $131 million.

The forecasts from the Institute for New Hampshire Studies are higher than last year's predictions. The period covers July 3-July 7.

Most of the visitors will be from New England and the Middle Atlantic States. Canadians are anticipated to be visiting New Hampshire at higher levels than last year.

Goldeneye via Flickr CC

New Hampshire officials are getting hit with calls, emails and tweets reacting to racist comments made by a town police commissioner.

Jim Bouley, mayor of the capital city of Concord, said the reaction from as far away as California included threats to cancel vacations in New Hampshire. The calls started Thursday after news reports detailed comments by Wolfeboro Police Commissioner Robert Copeland, who admitted using the N-word to describe President Barack Obama.

Ayahuasca in San Francisco and Mike Newton via flickr Creative Commons, via onthemedia.org & facebook.com/theamericans

Ahhh. We finally have a week full of warmer temps. What better way to spend your afternoon work break walk than with Word of Mouth? Pop in your earbuds and turn it up; today's show heats up, cools down, and explores real-life risks of the internet and a scandal relived through television.

Listen to the full show and click Read more for individual segments.

Better Tourism Through Cookies

Dec 5, 2013
Brady Carlson

All this month Foodstuffs is looking at baking – something many of us do around this time of year. And we’ll meet a range of people who bake at the holidays for a range of different reasons. For some innkeepers and bed and breakfast operators in the White Mountains, baking cookies is good for tourism.

That’s the idea behind the annual Inn to Inn Holiday Cookie and Candy Tour, which takes place December 14th and 15th.

Boyan Moskov

Ask and you shall receive. 

We asked our listeners and contributors to send us favorite foliage shots from around the state. We're around peak right now, and this is how it looks. 

Have more photos to contribute? Send them to us by email, or post them on our Facebook page. 

NHPR / Michael Brindley

With the government shutdown now in its second week, there’s growing bipartisan concern in New Hampshire about the impact on state tourism and the local economy.

But there’s a difference of opinion on who’s to blame in Washington.

With Columbus Day weekend approaching, nearly two dozen campgrounds on federal land in the White Mountain National Forest remain closed due to the shutdown.

State Representative Warren Groen of Rochester says the state’s tourists and business owners are paying the price.

ilovebutter via Flickr Creative Commons

New Hampshire tourism officials say the fall foliage is most vibrant and at or just past peak in the Dartmouth-Lake Sunapee region.

Officials emphasize that New Hampshire's parks and campgrounds are open and unaffected by the federal government shutdown. Ranger stations in the White Mountains National Forest are closed.

Foliage is now past peak in Pittsburg and most areas of the Great North Woods, which typically peak first.

North Conway and Lincoln are at or near peak, while Bristol, Hebron and Rumney are at 50 percent.

Transplant Tourism

Jul 25, 2013
Meg Heckman

Organ and tissue transplantation is a rapidly-developing area of medicine, one that’s rich with the potential to save lives and fraught with tough policy questions. The demand for replacement organs far outweighs the supply, so many patients die waiting. Others are willing to take drastic steps -- like moving to another state or a foreign country -- to get the organs they need to survive. Producer Meg Heckman brings us the story of Jim McHugh, a man in dire need of a liver transplant, and how his move to Indiana from New England during a snowstorm proved to be incredibly fortuitous.

Colebrook Opens Streets To Welcome ATV Tourists

Jan 10, 2013
Chris Jensen for NHPR

The town of Colebrook in the North Country has taken a new step to try and attract ATV-riding tourists.

It’s opening up some of its streets to the all-terrain vehicles.

NHPR’s Chris Jensen reports.

Colebrook’s select board has approved opening up 21 streets in the town to ATV riders, says Jules Kennett, one of the three selectmen.

 “We finally came up with what we believe is the safest, most accessible way to get the ATVers into the center of town.”

The speed limit would be 10 miles per hour.

After a rough winter season last year, New Hampshire tourism officials predict nearly seven million people will visit the state between now and the end of February.

The state Division of Travel and Tourism Development says those tourists are expected to spend $860 million, which would be up by 9 percent over last year.

Those figures come from the Institute for New Hampshire Studies.

David Brooks, writer for the Nashua Telegraph, walks us through current and future threats that global warming poses to the ski industry.


Matthew B. Brown

In winter sports communities out west, ski lodges are shedding their antlers for a more contemporary decor. But does the cocoa taste as sweet? And will New England ever give up its slopeside a-frame aesthetic?

gLangille via Flickr Creative Commons

More than three decades ago, the Mountain Gorilla project started a tourism project to save the threatened gorilla population from poaching. The project hired poachers as park rangers and demonstrated that live gorillas were much more valuable as tourist attractions than dead ones. Since then, gorilla tourism has added hundreds of millions of foreign tourist dollars to state coffers in Central Africa, and the great ape populations have seen a modest rebound.

A prominent Canadian environmentalist says opposition to the Northern Pass project has not generated widespread coverage in Canada. The head of the Sierra Club Canada spoke at Plymouth State University Tuesday night.

NHPR’s Chris Jensen reports.

John Bennett, the executive director of the Sierra Club Canada, disappointed a group of about 100 Northern Pass opponents when he told them their efforts have received little media attention in Canada.

“It may be showing up in some of the Quebec press but it is not showing up in the national press in Canada.”

Jonathan Lynch / NHPR

Both gubernatorial candidates Maggie Hassan and Ovide Lamontagne say the state’s tourism efforts are important but must be weighed against budget concerns.

Lamontagne and Hassan appeared at a tourism summit in Concord Wednesday morning, answering audience-submitted questions from tourism businesses owners.

Both candidates say they wouldn’t support an increase in the Meals and Rentals tax -- the second largest source of revenue for the state.

However, Hassan stated that she wouldn’t rule out raising tolls and the gas tax, but said it’s not likely.

We sit down with George Bald, outgoing Commissioner of the New Hampshire Department of Resources and Economic Development.  Bald announced he’ll retire in November after serving nearly thirteen years as chief advocate for the state’s economy, promoting business development and overseeing travel and tourism, including the state park system. We’ll talk with him about his tenure. 

Chris Jensen for NHPR

One might think that the mom-and-pop motels of the 50’s and 60’s have all been replaced by cookie-cutter nationwide chains.

But some vintage lodgings in New Hampshire have found a way to prosper.

And now there’s an effort to push a plan to help them do even better.

We can’t blame Norman Bates for the decline of the mom-and-pop motels.

Screechy music from the shower scene in “Psycho.”

Photo Credit Atelier Teee, via Flickr Creative Commons

 

Part 1: A Horse of Exactly the Same Color and Jumping for Gold...Someday

Produced with Zach Nugent

Rent Crackdown

Jul 16, 2012
Photo Credit James.Tompson, Via Flickr Creative Commons

Increasing numbers of tourists turn to websites like craigslist and airbnb.com to find cheaper and more intimate lodging, the short-term vacation rental industry has exploded into a multi-billion dollar industry.  For a while, these home B&B’s and low-key online arrangements slept under the radar, but now lobbyists for big hospitality are encouraging states and cities to crack down, with New York City issuing over 1900 violations in less than a year to homeowners who rent out property for less than a month.

This Memorial Day weekend, the New Hampshire Division of Travel and Tourism predicts more than half a million visitors will flock to the state.  That’s an increase of two-percent over last year.

America’s war on tourists. Since 9/11, increased security measures and visa restrictions have made travel to the US an increasing hassle. Earlier this month, President Obama announced plans to attract twice as many tourists to America in the next decade. He projected that the initiative would add two-to- three million jobs and result in $250 billion in revenue by the end of 2021. Matthew Yglesias is on board.

Photo courtesy of Philipp Meuser of Dom Publishers

The well-publicized (albeit failed) launch of a satellite by North Korea last month sent a signal to the international community: Kim Jong-un is carrying on in the brinksman-like tradition of his father Kim Jong-il. Between them, they’ve built and maintained what is arguably the most isolated country on the planet – the Democratic Peoples Republic of North Korea or DPNK. Most of us will never visit the country, or see the grand monuments or stadia of its capital, Pyongyang.

A North Country Tourism Program Looks For Funds

Apr 26, 2012
Chris Jensen for NHPR

Tourism is seen as one of the economic underpinnings of the North Country.

But a highly touted program designed to boost tourism is running low on funds while facing a tricky question: After spending about $1 million was it successful?

NHPR’s Chris Jensen reports.

 

In 2008  - with the paper industry pretty much dead -  some in the North Country gloomily wondered about its economic prospects.

So, the non-profit Northern Community Investment Corporation decided to see whether more could be done to promote tourism.

After Decades Away, Tourists Return To Liberia

Apr 19, 2012

Liberia has been better known for conflict than tourism the past couple of decades.

But this week, a group of 150 tourists, many of them Americans, arrived for a brief stay in the small nation on Africa's West Coast. When their cruise liner docked in the capital of Monrovia, they became the largest group of tourists to visit the country in many years, probably since the 1970s.

Dock workers in Monrovia usually unload cargo ships full of secondhand clothes or rice — not a cruise ship full of American tourists.

It's Tourist Season in N.H.

May 29, 2006
Cheryl Senter

Memorial Day weekend is the unofficial start of summer.

And across the state, resorts, hotels, and other tourist attractions are taking care of last minute primping before the onslaught of summer season.

One of those attractions is of course, Hampton Beach on the Seacoast.

On Friday, road crews were still painting lines on a section of Route 1A, that goes along the beach.

But ready or not, the tourists came, as they always do, to enjoy the beaches and the boardwalk, to lie in the warm sun and play in the sand.

Shannon Mullen

Every year thousands of tourists come to New Hampshire to see the state's brilliant fall colors.

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