Trade

NAFTA Turns Twenty

Dec 3, 2013
Chandu Sadasivan / Flickr Creative Commons

President Bill Clinton signed the North American Free Trade Agreement in December 1993, eliminating all tariffs and trade restrictions among the U.S., Canada, and Mexico.  The treaty, though, has always been controversial in all three nations.  Two decades later, we examine its impacts, and which predictions about it have come true.

GUESTS:

Tariffs, quotas, import-limiting regulations are all on the rise, with countries increasingly trying to boost their own economies.  Lawmakers in the U.S. meanwhile are pondering new “Buy American” provisions, as the EU considers its own “Buy European” initiative. But many say these tactics can have unwanted effects, including foreign retaliation and job loss. Friday we'll talk with Dartmouth Professor Douglas Irwin about the Protectionism predicament

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With the focus on Europe’s economic woes and China’s clout, it’s easy to overlook that our nation’s largest geographic border, Canada, is also our largest trading partner.  Although, it works well most of the time, there are some tensions, like  over duty-free status, controversial energy projects, and imbalances in tourism traffic.  We’ll look at how these issues affect the bottom dollar in both countries. 

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