trapping

The Conflict Over Coexisting With Beavers

Apr 14, 2017
flickr/cc

Beavers (Castor canadensis) have been in North America for two million years. Their ponds ease flooding downstream, and support large numbers of bird species, fish, amphibians, and otters. They are a keystone species to an entire eco-system. Humans and beavers have a long history together because they like to live in the same places, but the way we've built our infrastructure has almost guaranteed our two species will be locked in eternal conflict.


Beavers have been busy this summer, building dams and creating wetlands—in places they're not always welcome. Commercial trappers are getting more calls to remove beavers from neighborhoods this season, and that's due to a drop in international fur prices. When prices for fur drop overseas, the number of beavers in New Hampshire goes up.

Anton Kaska unfolds a beaver trap and wedges it into the swampy ground in a marsh in a Bedford neighborhood. It's designed to catch the beaver around the shoulders and neck.