Tuition

Jim Graham / Flicker CC

In-state students in the University of New Hampshire system may have to wait until June to know how much tuition will cost this coming school year. The University System’s Board of Trustees announced today they would not set rates for in-state students until they learn how much state funding they will receive during this budget cycle.

That could make it tricky for some families to decide what they can afford to attend.

New Hampshire's community colleges want $6.4 million in new money in the next budget to lower tuition by $10 per credit hour.

Ryan Lessard for NHPR

A new report finds New Hampshire college graduates are – once again – burdened with the most student debt.

According to the annual report from the nonprofit Project on Student Debt, students who graduated from Granite State colleges and universities in 2013 had an average debt of nearly $33,000, the highest in the nation.

This marks the third time in four years New Hampshire has had the highest average debt, after ranking second highest last year.

The president of the University of New Hampshire wants to hold the line on tuition costs for at least another two years.

College Board / https://trends.collegeboard.org/sites/default/files/trends-2010-tuition-discounting-institutional-aid-report.pdf

Rising tuition attracts a lot of headlines, but the amount that schools give out in financial aid is also on the rise.  Financial aid can make higher education more accessible to low-income students, but it can also serve as a tool to attract the types of students school want to attract, and to fill seats that might otherwise go empty. Lucy Lapovsky is an education consultant who has studied the question of how much students are actually paying for college and spoke to All Things Considered Host Brady Carlson. 

Fast Company / Flickr/CC

We kick off A Matter of Degrees, a week-long series on higher education, with what's behind the rising costs of college. Critics blame sports programs, fancy cafeterias, and highly paid professors, but officials say you need to make college attractive, and what students pay now will be returned exponentially in the future. (digital post by Faith Meixell)

GUESTS: 

Brainlesssteel via Flickr CC

As college students prepare to leave New Hampshire and Vermont for summer break, a recent national study raises questions about how many will return in the fall.

The National Student Clearinghouse Research Center says both states rank very high in terms of the percentage of students who graduate within six years of starting at four-year public campuses. But they also rank high in terms of students who finish in another state.

Courtesy The University Of New Hampshire

A report released this week by the Project on Student Debt shows average student debt among New Hampshire’s college graduates increased slightly last year.

Emily Corwin

As a slow economy pinches family budgets and the cost of college tuition climbs ever higher, more high school graduates are choosing to start their educations at community colleges. As those students demand a more traditional college experience, community colleges in Nashua, Manchester, and now the Great Bay are building in new athletic facilities, teams and clubs.  

Michael Fischer is thumbing through the architectural renderings for Great Bay Community College’s new $5 million dollar recreational facility.

<a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/gadgetdude/804190044/">gadgetdude </a> / flickr

New data released today shows New Hampshire students graduating with the highest debt loads in the nation. 

According to a report from the Institute for College Access and Success, the Class of 2011 averaged $32,440 in debt.

It’s the second year in a row New Hampshire has had the highest average load. 

Tara Payne with the NH Higher Education Assistance Foundation says the numbers send a signal to students and parents.

Chris LoCascio, a junior at UC Riverside, feared that there was no end in sight for tuition increases at the University of California. The state kept cutting subsidies, students kept protesting, but no one had any answers. So he and other students decided to turn the discussion on its head.

What if, he says, "instead of charging students upfront for their education, students would attend the UC with no upfront costs whatsoever"?

Under the Fix UC proposal, the bill would not come due until students graduate and start making money.