Tuition

Education
4:59 pm
Thu December 5, 2013

At $32,698, N.H. Second-Worst In Nation For Average Student Debt

Credit Courtesy The University Of New Hampshire

A report released this week by the Project on Student Debt shows average student debt among New Hampshire’s college graduates increased slightly last year.

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NH News
4:11 pm
Wed November 6, 2013

Community Colleges' New Amenities Meet New Needs With New Fees

Zach Aumand sits with his friend Ryan Leavitt at Great Bay Community College's current Student Center.
Credit Emily Corwin

As a slow economy pinches family budgets and the cost of college tuition climbs ever higher, more high school graduates are choosing to start their educations at community colleges. As those students demand a more traditional college experience, community colleges in Nashua, Manchester, and now the Great Bay are building in new athletic facilities, teams and clubs.  

Michael Fischer is thumbing through the architectural renderings for Great Bay Community College’s new $5 million dollar recreational facility.

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NH News
1:13 pm
Thu October 18, 2012

N.H. Students Graduate With Highest Debt Loads In Nation

New data released today shows New Hampshire students graduating with the highest debt loads in the nation. 

According to a report from the Institute for College Access and Success, the Class of 2011 averaged $32,440 in debt.

It’s the second year in a row New Hampshire has had the highest average load. 

Tara Payne with the NH Higher Education Assistance Foundation says the numbers send a signal to students and parents.

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Education
9:55 am
Tue February 7, 2012

UC Students Propose Alternative To Tuition Increases

A student prepares to speak in opposition to proposed tuition increases at a University of California Board of Regents meeting in July 2011.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Tue February 7, 2012 12:01 am

Chris LoCascio, a junior at UC Riverside, feared that there was no end in sight for tuition increases at the University of California. The state kept cutting subsidies, students kept protesting, but no one had any answers. So he and other students decided to turn the discussion on its head.

What if, he says, "instead of charging students upfront for their education, students would attend the UC with no upfront costs whatsoever"?

Under the Fix UC proposal, the bill would not come due until students graduate and start making money.

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