Unemployment

Kandy Jaxx / Flickr

Seventy-two percent of young adults age 20 to 24 in the Granite State had a job last year.  That’s according to the Annie E. Casey Foundation’s Youth and Work report

In part five of the StateImpact series “Getting By, Getting Ahead” reporter Amanda Loder talks with a recently laid-off teacher in the Merrimack Valley. In this series, StateImpact is traveling across New Hampshire, gathering personal stories from the people behind the economy.

bytemarks / Flickr Creative Commons

Twenty-three hundred jobs were added to New Hampshire payrolls between April and May, but the seasonally adjusted unemployment rate remains stuck at 5%.

There was good news for Coos County: the North Country’s rate dipped below 8% for the first time this year.

Grafton County has the State’s lowest unemployment at 4.1%.

All in all, the data met expectations, says Bob Cote, a researcher with NH Employment Security.

Sheryl Rich-Kern / NHPR

As the last of the soldiers who served in Iraq and Afghanistan return to their native New Hampshire, about one third will retire from the military for medical reasons.  That means they’re likely to face one of their toughest battles yet as they search for meaningful employment.

Photo be Clark Gregor, courtesy of Flickr Creative Commons

An increasingly common anxiety for freshly-minted undergraduates is finding a job in their field with a decent enough salary to pay off their student loans. For those with new advanced degrees, the stakes are even higher...  2008 figures from The Center for College Affordability and Productivity estimate that 16% of those qualified to be college professors, lawyers, and doctors are working jobs at the high school graduate level. Helping wayward professionals put their highly-trained brains to work, is Jon F.

For as long as he can remember, German teenager Robin Dittmar has been obsessed with airplanes. As a little boy, the sound of a plane overhead would send him into the backyard to peer into the sky. Toys had to have wings. Even today, Dittmar sees his car as a kind of ersatz Boeing.

"I've got the number 747 as the number plate of my car. I'm really in love with this airplane," the 18-year-old says.

Part of a series

As 2011 was winding down, consumer spirits were starting to rise. Now the momentum has carried into the new year, with polls showing consumer sentiment continuing to improve.

Economists say that negative factors, such as falling home values or rising meat prices, are nowhere near as important as the growth in jobs.

Elkhart, Ind., is known as the RV capital of the world. The city suffered badly when the recession hit and demand for recreational vehicles all but screeched to a halt. That's when local and state leaders started looking for ways to bolster the area's manufacturing industry.

The unemployment rate in the city along the Michigan border eventually soared to 20 percent — the highest in the nation at the time.

The last of the U-S troops are now returning from Iraq.

Once home they’re likely to end up joining thousands of other veterans looking for work in a bleak job market.

Despite government incentives to get companies to hire vets, unemployment among vets is still higher than civilians.

The youngest veterans struggle the most.

Twenty-two year old Courtney Selig went into the military to better herself.

State Job Numbers Improve

Dec 13, 2011

The state’s unemployment rate fell one tenth of a percent in November.  The current rate of 5.2 percent, seasonally adjusted, came with strong growth in the retail sector.

The jobs that come with selling stuff delivered over 3,000 new jobs in November and strictly speaking, more than just Christmas shopping drove the numbers.  Seasonal  adjustments are designed to filter out that sort of impact.

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