Upper Valley

The Grafton Superior Court will hear a motion to dismiss a much-publicized case involving a swastika-printed flour sack in an antiques store in Littleton, New Hampshire Tuesday. 

In November, Katherine Ferrier took a picture of the flour sack and posted it to Facebook, writing as part of a long post, "How do you think it’s okay to hang this thing here, front and center, given everything it stands for?"

Britta Greene / NHPR

AVA - a Lebanon-based art gallery, studio and educational space - will celebrate the official dedication of a new sculpture center on Thursday.

 

The center houses studio space for woodworking, metal and glass forging, welding, and other three-dimensional art forms AVA has been unable to offer in its existing facilities.

 

jdurham / Morguefile

River Valley Community College, based in Claremont, is launching two new programs in computer science and information technology. The move is an attempt by the college to better tailor its offerings to the needs of local employers. 

"There are actually companies that are very, very concerned about not finding the right talent in the state," said Ali Rafieymehr, interim president and vice president of academic affairs at RVCC.

Britta Greene / NHPR

What’s notable about Margie Emmons' kayak tours is not necessarily what you can see on the tour, it’s what you can’t.

 

On a recent morning, Emmons led a small group of women on a tour of the Moore Reservoir, just west of Littleton, New Hampshire. Two towns - one on the Vermont side and one in New Hampshire - used to stand in this spot. The remains of both flooded after New England Power built the Moore Dam in the 1950s.

 

Courtesy of Dartmouth-Hitchcock

Joanne Conroy, a hospital executive in Burlington, Mass., will be the next CEO and president of Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center. Conroy will take over the role in August after the departure of James Weinstein.  

Dartmouth-Hitchcock is the state's largest health system, with about 12,000 employees and 24 clinics in New Hampshire and Vermont. Conroy, an anesthesiologist, will be the first woman to lead the Lebanon-based system.

Britta Greene / NHPR

Four panelists -- three of them veterans -- answered questions about their personal experiences navigating gender and sexuality issues at a public discussion at the Veterans Affairs Medical Center in White River Junction, Vermont on Wednesday.

The event was part of a broader effort by the VA to let veterans know they can be honest about their gender and sexuality and still access medical care within the VA system.

Jeannette S. / Flicker CC

Bears have been a major headache in Hanover this spring. One mother bear and her three yearlings, in particular, became well known to residents for their aggressive behavior. The animals are attracted to unsecured dumpsters and residential garbage cans.

Britta Greene / NHPR

CNN anchor Jake Tapper reflected on his career in journalism in a commencement address to graduates of Dartmouth College Sunday.

Tapper has been in the spotlight recently for his pointed, and at times combative, back-and-forths with members of the Trump administration. But he said his 2012 book detailing a deadly battle in Afghanistan remains his proudest accomplishment.

Britta Greene / NHPR

The Lebanon City Council voted Wednesday to amend the city's master plan, removing references to natural gas as a favored energy source. The move is largely symbolic, but it reflects growing concern around the environmental impact of natural gas.

Residents in the Upper Valley are organizing to fight a proposal by Liberty Utilities for a new natural gas facility and pipeline running through Lebanon and Hanover. The state Public Utilities Commission is slated to hear that proposal in September.

NHPR Staff

Dartmouth College is reaffirming its commitment to reducing greenhouse gas emissions following President Donald Trump's decision to pull out from the Paris climate agreement. 

On Monday, Dartmouth President Phil Hanlon joined the presidents of eleven other schools in signing a letter underlining a commitment to sustainability, including more quickly transitioning to low-carbon energy sources. 

Living with Black Bears in Back Yards

Jun 5, 2017

The recent saga of the troublesome family of bears in Hanover, destined to be killed after they entered a home in search of food, is one of the latest examples of conflict between black bears and humans in New Hampshire.  Governor Chris Sununu intervened, and the three yearlings were captured and relocated to the north country, although the mother bear has yet to be located.  The Hanover human-bear conflict generated concern nationwide, with hundreds signing an online petition and flooding N.H. Fish & Game with calls.  Why did this conflict resonate with so many - and how do we continue to live with bears in New Hampshire?

 


Britta Greene for NHPR

The EPA has awarded $200,000 for the redevelopment of an old paper mill site along the Connecticut River.

Figuring out what to do with old mill buildings is an ongoing - and expensive - challenge for many New England towns. This site, the old Robertson Mill, actually sits on an island in the Connecticut River, right between New Hampshire and Bellows Falls, Vermont. You can hear the nearby falls from here on the property.

"It’s one of the old mill buildings that this town, really...a lot of this economy was built upon."

Charlene Music

The two places could not be more different: the Dartmouth College campus and the Sullivan County jailhouse. Yet, in a new documentary, college students from Dartmouth and female inmates worked together to write short plays about what it’s like to be incarcerated. The process generates a conversation about privilege and the justice system.

Seven years in the making, the film debuts this Saturday at the White River Indie Festival. NHPR’s Peter Biello spoke with the documentary’s director, Signe Taylor, about the making of the film.

Britta Greene / NHPR

About 50 people showed up for a public forum with the Lebanon Police Chief Richard Mello in West Lebanon Tuesday night.

Since the November election, residents have been approaching the mayor and city councilors with questions around immigration enforcement by local law enforcement, according to Councilor Karen Liot Hill. “A lot of people seem to be really concerned about what might happen -- not necessarily what was happening, but what might happen in the future,” she said.

The forum aimed to address some of those concerns. 

Flickr Creative Commons / Brave Sir Robin

The Director of the National Institute on Drug Abuse joined New Hampshire Rep. Annie Kuster in Hanover Tuesday afternoon. They spoke as part of a discussion on the opioid crisis hosted by Dartmouth College.

Kuster took advantage of the opportunity to criticize President Trump’s proposed cuts to Medicaid. “We all know the importance of access to treatment for addressing this crisis," she said. "I will continue to hold this administration accountable for their actions in addressing the opioid epidemic.”

 

Three juvenile bears in Hanover that were initially targeted to be destroyed have been trapped and relocated.

New Hampshire Fish & Game had said last week the three bears and their mother had to be killed, after two of the cubs entered a home. But Governor Chris Sununu then intervened, saying the bears should be released in a remote location.

Courtesy Sarah Lindberg

It’s been a week of high-stakes ups-and-downs for four bears living in the Hanover area. A home break-in, traps set, and in the end, a last-minute reprieve by the governor.   


Courtesy Sarah Lindberg

The State Fish and Game Department is being flooded with calls about four bears in the Hanover area. Officials recently decided to trap and kill the bears after two of the animals entered a home in town. 

Andrew Timmins heads the department’s bear program and says many people are calling from far away, wanting to save the animals.  

State officials have set traps for four bears in the Hanover area after two of the animals recently entered a home there. Once caught, the bears will be shot, according to Mark Ellingwood, Wildlife Division Chief for the New Hampshire Fish and Game Department.

Flickr Creative Commons / Brave Sir Robin

Dartmouth Professor N. Bruce Duthu has turned down the position of Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences following charges that he supported a boycott of Israeli academic institutions. 

Duthu, a professor of Native American Studies and an Associate Dean, was appointed earlier this spring to be the next Dean of the Faculty starting July 1.

todd bookman\nhpr

Voters in Hanover will decide Tuesday if two Dartmouth college  fraternity houses might again house students. Dartmouth and Hanover’s planning board both oppose the zoning change being pushed by two fraternities no longer recognized by the college.

Allison Quantz for NHPR

Dartmouth College is joining other Ivy League schools in opposing President Trump’s immigration order.

The Hanover-based school, along with 16 other elite institutions, filed a legal brief in a New York federal court on Monday. The colleges and universities argue that the travel ban, which is currently on hold following a federal appeals court ruling, would harm their ability to attract and educate the world’s best scholars.

Global Rescue

If you fall on your hiking trip in Bhutan, or get caught in political upheaval during your study abroad, a New Hampshire company has your back. Global Rescue is a business that has evacuated its clients from some of the most dangerous places on earth. Still, not everyone agrees with their philosophy. 

In 2012, Allan Lokos was on a small plane in Myanmar after a trip with his wife.

“And apparently, the pilot misjudged where we were, and he began to bring the plane down at least a mile short of where it was supposed to be.”

NHPR Staff

Dartmouth College and the town of Hanover are in a stand-off over a new $18 million athletic facility the college wants to build.

Last month, the Hanover Planning Board denied Dartmouth a permit for the proposed 70,000 square foot building. The structure would house training facilities for student-athletes to practice their sports during the winter.

The decision was a victory for neighbors who oppose the project for its size and proximity to a residential area.

Allison Quantz for NHPR

Dartmouth College says it has spent $8.4 million cleaning up contamination on property where scientists once dumped carcasses of lab animals in the 1960s and 1970s.

The Ivy League school began cleaning up the site in 2011 and realized a year later that at least one carcinogen had leaked into the groundwater. Last year, it determined one family's well water was contaminated.

Dartmouth provided the family with bottled water and sampled over 100 drinking wells in the neighborhood.

Facing a projected operating loss of $2.6 million, New Hampshire's Colby-Sawyer College says it will "restructure" and lay off 18 employees.

College President Sue Stuebner says seven faculty members and 11 staffers at the New London college received notice Monday. Another 11 learned their hours will be modified and more than a dozen who are leaving won't be replaced.

The Valley News reports Stuebner attributes the current year's operating loss to recent fluctuation in Colby-Sawyer's enrollment, which went from about 1,500 four years ago to 1,100 this year.

NHPR

The CEO of Dartmouth-Hitchcock says he will step down when his contract expires next June.

A spine surgeon by training, James Weinstein has led the state’s largest health care system since 2011. During that time, he’s had to navigate both local and national challenges, including the arrival of the Affordable Care Act.

BBC Arts, November 6, 2015

Although you would be hard-pressed to find a palm tree or a kalua pig roast in New Hampshire, there are a plethora of ukulele opportunities in the Granite State.  The uke is a four-string member of the lute family, and originated in Hawaii in the 19th century, an adaptation of the Portuguese machete.  According to Hawaiian lore, the name means "the gift that came here”, from the Hawaiian words uku (gift or reward) and lele (to come).

For the 5 percent of Vermonters who do not identify as white, finding a barber who has experience with a diversity of hair textures is challenging. But a barber contracted by Dartmouth College to cut hair for students of color is making a difference.

Dennis Amith via Flickr CC

Dartmouth College officials say a second private well near a Hanover farm where contaminated laboratory animals were buried in the 1960s and 1970s has tested positive for a toxic chemical believed to have migrated from the site.

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