Upper Valley

Alison Palizzolo

The Hood Museum at Dartmouth College is presenting its first ever sound art exhibition this fall. Resonant Spaces: Sound Art at Dartmouth features seven installations throughout campus and the town of Hanover.

Morning Edition Host Rick Ganley took a tour of the installations with Amelia Kahl,the associate curator of academic programming for the museum.

The exhibition is open to the public, and will run through Dec. 10.

Britta Greene / New Hampshire Public Radio

There’s a doctor in New London who’s ending her decades-long medical practice on Friday. She’s nearly 85, but her retirement is not voluntary. She says she’s being forced to shut down by a system that no longer values the type of patient-centered medicine that she practices. But the New Hampshire Board of Medicine has a different take. They’re challenging her medical decision making and other aspects of her work. 

Britta Greene / New Hampshire Public Radio

After starting a first-of-its-kind lead-testing program in its schools, Claremont may soon allow parents to opt-out of the requirements. The city launched the program, which requires lead tests for all incoming kindergarten and pre-k students, this year.

Claremont is one of several high-risk communities for lead poisoning in the state, largely because of its old housing stock.

But at least one community member has raised concerns that parents can't sign a waiver to opt-out of the testing requirement, as is allowed for certain vaccinations.

Britta Greene / New Hampshire Public Radio

A handful of Claremont residents demonstrated outside the city’s high school Thursday, holding anti-bullying posters and asking students to sign a pledge stating they won’t bully in the future.

The demonstration comes after a highly publicized incident earlier this fall in which a young boy was allegedly attacked by local teenagers. The boy’s family says he was left to hang by a rope and nearly died.

Britta Greene/NHPR

Here’s one thing you might not know about the Upper Valley: it's home to hundreds of Puerto Rican dogs. 

That’s because of the relationship between one New Hampshire family and a shelter on the island of Vieques, off Puerto Rico’s eastern shore. 

It all started about five years ago, when Lyme resident Andrea Heitzman was visiting the island and spotted a small black dog on the street. He was a street dog, homeless. She immediately fell in love.

Britta Greene / NHPR

Inside Daddypops Tumble Inn Diner in Claremont, the owner’s daughter – Fallon Carter – is working behind the counter as she talks with her mom and a friend.

They’re discussing a recent incident in town that’s been all over the news. The family of a young biracial boy says local teenagers intentionally hanged their son in a lynching-style attack. He survived, but had to be airlifted to the hospital.

Britta Greene / NHPR

The parents of a teenager involved in the alleged attack of a young boy in Claremont say the incident was an accident, and was not racially motivated.

Their son was just joking around, they told Newsweek in an interview. He saw the boy standing on the picnic table and thought he'd scare him from behind, they said. He did not know there was a rope around the boy's neck. The kids had been playing with the rope and climbing trees, the parents explained.

Britta Greene / NHPR

Over the next several months, the Claremont schools will take a closer look at issues of discrimination and bullying in the district. This comes after an alleged racially motivated attack of a young boy in town by local teenagers.

Dartmouth’s Hopkins Center for the Arts staged two shows last weekend of “Antigone in Ferguson.” The play draws connections between the ancient Greek tragedy and the 2014 shooting of Michael Brown.

Conversation after the show touched on recent events just south of Hanover, in Claremont. The family of a young boy there alleges a group of local teenagers attempted to hang the child by a rope in a racially motivated attack. They say he nearly died.

A group of New Hampshire residents and sportsmen’s organizations is suing the Department of Environmental Services over boat access on Lake Sunapee.

The suit comes after Gov. Chris Sununu pulled the plug earlier this year on a decades-long plan for boat access at what’s known as the Wild Goose site on the lake’s southern shore. He did so by choosing to not renew a wetlands permit for the site.

The complaint, filed in Sullivan County Superior Court, argues that DES, not the governor, has the authority to decide on that permit.

Valley News - Jennifer Hauck, Pool

Dartmouth-Hitchcock officials say they’re reviewing all safety procedures following the fatal shooting of a 70-year-old patient Tuesday.

Speaking outside the hospital's administrative offices Wednesday afternoon, Chief Clinical Officer Ed Merrens said a swift response from staff and law enforcement allowed for minimal patient disruption. “We had a full day yesterday. We had a busy OR, birthing pavilion, medical units -- everything was going,” he said. “Even in our surgical intensive care unit, we had patients taken care of.”

DHMC

 

A man shot and killed his mother at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center in Lebanon on Tuesday, New Hampshire Attorney General Gordon MacDonald said.

Gov. Chris Sununu has asked the state Attorney General's office to help police in Claremont with the investigation of an alleged attack against a biracial boy in the city, according to a statement released by the governor's office Tuesday. 

Britta Greene / NHPR

The parking lot was overflowing at Claremont’s back-to-school fair this year, held at a playing field just outside of downtown. Families with young kids checked out the fire truck and race cars, and visited booths offering back-to-school info, giveaways and games.

One booth had a freebie no child was begging for: free on-site lead tests. 


Courtesy

The back-and-forth between Dartmouth faculty and College President Phil Hanlon continues over the school's response to comments by Mark Bray. Bray is a faculty member and has been a prominent speaker on the Antifa movement since the clashes in Charlottesville.

In a statement last month, President Hanlon distanced the college from Bray's comments around the role of violence in taking on white supremacy.

Courtesy of Crawford Notch Campground

The fall hunting season is now underway across the state. Starting Friday, hunting is open for black bears, Canada geese and gray squirrels. Deer and turkey season begins later this autumn.

New Hampshire Fish and Game officials have set a target population for black bears at just under 5,000. This year, they estimate there are more than 6,000 in the state. That means hunting restrictions will be fairly liberal -- good odds for those heading out to the woods.

Britta Greene / NHPR

Tony Strat stands in the grass outside his screen-printing studio in the Upper Valley, washing the ink off of used screens with a hose. Even though he’s scrubbed the screens down, shadows of  designs he’s printed are still visible. “Gender is a social construct,” one of them reads.

Strat, 26, is an artist, entrepreneur and athlete. He’s worked in finance and started his own skateboarding company. He's also transgender. He started his transition process last year.

Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center

A former Dartmouth-Hitchcock doctor who had his license suspended earlier this year after faking medical records and diverting an opioid for his own use can now return to practice.

The New Hampshire Board of Medicine ruled earlier this month that Dr. Christopher Manfred can begin practicing medicine again pending certain conditions. Those include practicing only critical care medicine for the first year and agreeing to monitoring.

via the store's website

An Upper Valley business is reviving a fundraising campaign from the days of Hurricane Katrina to help with the current storm crisis in Texas. 

Courtesy

Faculty members at Dartmouth are criticizing the college for its statement about a lecturer who's been speaking widely on the so-called Antifa movement.

Officials with the VA hospital in White River Junction are stressing this week that veterans are welcome at the hospital regardless of gender or sexual identity.

Details of new White House guidelines for the Pentagon emerged Wednesday and were confirmed by NPR. Under those guidelines, transgender people will be banned from enlisting and those in active service will be subject to removal at the discretion of Defense Secretary James Mattis.

NH DOJ's Charitable Trust Unit

An Upper Valley non-profit that serves veterans is being shut down after an investigation by the Attorney General’s office found evidence of fraud.

Project VetCare provides housing and support to military veterans, as well as a meeting place for students at Dartmouth College who are veterans. The non-profit, which was formed in 2012, owns two houses in Hanover.

Britta Greene / NHPR

About 100 people packed into the lodge at Mount Sunapee Ski Resort Tuesday night for an information session about Och-Ziff, the controversial hedge fund that's newly involved in the resort’s ownership.

The ski area at Mount Sunapee sits within the state park, but is privately run under a lease agreement with the state. Och-Ziff, which was recently involved in high-profile criminal proceedings surrounding foreign bribery charges, bought the leaseholder last year.

The New Hampshire Fish and Game Commission is expressing "serious disagreement" with Governor Chris Sununu's decision to halt long-standing plans for a public boat-access site on Lake Sunapee. 

Plans for the site on the lake’s southwestern shore have been in the works for over two decades. In July, Sununu pulled the plug, saying "Enough is enough," and citing environmental and traffic concerns from nearby residents.

<a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/scottfidd/with/3211176586/">scottfidd</a> vis Flickr/Creative Commons

The state will hold a public meeting Tuesday about Mount Sunapee ski resort in response to controversy around the resort's new leaseholder, Och-Ziff.

The hedge fund recently paid over $400 million to settle charges that it bribed government officials in Africa to secure mining and energy deals.

New Hampshire owns the Mount Sunapee ski area, but operations there are privately run under a lease agreement with the state.

State officials and representatives of Och-Ziff will be at the meeting Tuesday night at 6pm at the Sunapee Lodge.

Britta Greene / NHPR

The Lebanon Planning Board Monday night approved plans for a new building to replace a historic church destroyed by fire last year. 

Lebanon’s First Baptist church dated back to the mid 1800s. A fire just after Christmas last year gutted the building. A local man who had been part of the church community was charged with starting the blaze.

Ever since, the congregation has been meeting at the Lebanon Middle School and working on plans to rebuild.

Britta Greene/NHPR

Usually, when you hear people making plans for a murder, it’s in a movie or on TV. But conversations recorded just last month in Plainfield, New Hampshire, aren't fiction.

Britta Greene/NHPR

More than 100 people gathered on the Lebanon green Saturday to rally against a proposed natural gas development in town.

By AlexiusHoratius (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

A historic church in Claremont that’s been vacant for years will soon open its doors once again. The church dates back to the 19th century and occupies a prime spot in Claremont’s downtown historic district.

It was owned by the city. but the cost of keeping up the property was simply too high, and it wasn’t being put to use. So, Claremont put it out to bid and got a single offer, from lake Sunapee Baptist Church of Newport.

They settled on a price of $700, a tiny fraction of the property’s approximately $240,000 value.

Proceedings are on hold for an 83-year-old defendant in a murder-for-hire case in Plainfield pending the results of a competency evaluation. 

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