Upper Valley

Britta Greene / New Hampshire Public Radio

About 10 patients of a New London doctor traveled to Concord Friday to observe her first appearance in court. Dr. Anna Konopka, who is 84, is challenging the New Hampshire Board of Medicine, saying she was forced to surrender her license and close her practice last month. The board argues instead that Konopka, aware of the allegations against her, chose to settle and surrender her license voluntarily.

Courtesy Sarah Lindberg

One of three bears relocated from the Hanover area this spring was shot and killed by a hunter in Quebec shortly after it was released, according to Andy Timmins, bear project leader for the New Hampshire Fish and Game Department.

File photo

Fall Mountain Regional School District Superintendent Lori Landry will meet with community members Thursday night about a controversial plan to allow marksmanship practices in the local high school cafeteria.

The Fall Mountain Regional School Board approved an exemption to its weapons policy earlier this fall to allow the Army JROTC program to bring in air rifles for the practices subject to certain safety precautions -- things like closed blinds, locked doors and secured entry.

NHPR File

   

Attorneys for a Dartmouth College professor under criminal investigation for sexual misconduct are pushing back against the allegations. 

 

Flickr Creative Commons / Brave Sir Robin

The New Hampshire Attorney General's office announced Tuesday it is one of several agencies looking into allegations of sexual misconduct at Dartmouth College.

Via Dartmouth.edu

Dartmouth College's head football coach is apologizing after an assistant coach punched a press box window at Harvard Stadium, spreading shards of broken glass on spectators, after his team fumbled a punt against Harvard.

One spectator was reportedly injured in the incident Saturday.

Dartmouth Head Coach Buddy Teevens released a statement after the game saying Assistant Coach Dion King "let his emotions get the best of him." Teevans said "Dion and Dartmouth Football are terribly sorry for his actions and any harm caused by them."

NHPR Staff

Dartmouth College is investigating allegations of “serious misconduct” involving three professors in the school’s psychological and brain sciences department. The professors – Todd Heatherton, Bill Kelley and Paul Whalen – are on paid leave.

“We are engaged in a thorough and impartial process that protects the rights of all parties and promotes the safety of our campus community," the college said in a statement.

Dartmouth has limited the professors’ access to campus pending the result of the investigation.

Nick Goldsmith / Courtesy of CLyme

Lyme residents packed their school's gymnasium Tuesday night for a special town meeting on the future of a local rock climbing destination known as Holt’s Ledge.

By a strong margin, they voted to remove metal hardware from the rock wall, which abuts Dartmouth’s Skiway. The hardware – known as bolts – allows climbers to anchor themselves to the rock surface, making the area safer and more accessible to those less advanced in the sport. It was installed without permission from the town.

Britta Greene / New Hampshire Public Radio

Lebanon will celebrate the opening of a new, state-of-the-art skatepark this weekend. The park is named in honor of Tyler Kirschner, a local skateboarder, who passed away two years ago at the age of 28.

After his death, his parents – to their surprise – started getting calls and emails from people all over the world, asking what had happened to "Rusty Berrings."

It turned out, unbeknownst to them, their son was an avid skateboard blogger who had built a broad community online. Rusty Berrings was his username.

Rob Strong / Dartmouth College

The Dartmouth College Wind Ensemble will celebrate women composers Saturday night with a concert featuring works exclusively by female artists. The show, titled “Music, She Wrote…,” is one of several social-justice oriented performances this season at the Hopkins Center for the Arts.

(Editor’s Note: We strongly recommend listening to this story.)

Flicker CC / https://flic.kr/p/drsrm8

The Town of Newport is looking to join a growing list of New Hampshire communities turning to solar energy to power local municipal buildings.

Voters will decide at their town meeting in March whether to approve a deal with Norwich Solar Technologies. Under the agreement, the company would cover all research, development, construction and maintenance costs in exchange for the ability to benefit from federal tax credits, said Newport Town Manager Hunter Rieseberg.

Britta Greene for NHPR

Haven't been impressed with the leaf peeping in New Hampshire so far this year? You're not alone.

Dave Lutz, a research associate in the Environmental Studies Department at Dartmouth College, has been thinking a lot about fall foliage for a paper he’s been working on. He’s been watching what he calls “indicator trees” along his drive to work – certain species he watches for their color and behavior.

Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center

Dartmouth-Hitchcock is planning its first 24-hour retail pharmacy open to the general public.

The pharmacy will have some of the same offerings as a CVS or a Walgreens -- things like shampoo and toothpaste, plus over-the-counter medicines like Advil and Nyquil.

Mary McIntyre / NHPR

The Hood Museum at Dartmouth College is presenting its first ever sound art exhibition this fall. Resonant Spaces: Sound Art at Dartmouth features seven installations throughout campus and the town of Hanover.

Morning Edition Host Rick Ganley took a tour of the installations with Amelia Kahl, the associate curator of academic programming for the museum.


Britta Greene / New Hampshire Public Radio

Dr. Anna Konopka’s medical office sits just across the driveway from her house, tucked along the shore of Pleasant Lake in New London. There’s no cell service, no wifi. Her phone rings off the hook.

At 85, she’s set to close her practice Friday, but the move is not voluntary. She says she’s being forced to shut down by a system that no longer values the type of patient-centered medicine that she practices.  

The New Hampshire Board of Medicine has a different take. They’re challenging her medical decision-making and other fundamental aspects of her work.

Britta Greene / New Hampshire Public Radio

After starting a first-of-its-kind lead-testing program in its schools, Claremont may soon allow parents to opt-out of the requirements. The city launched the program, which requires lead tests for all incoming kindergarten and pre-k students, this year.

Claremont is one of several high-risk communities for lead poisoning in the state, largely because of its old housing stock.

But at least one community member has raised concerns that parents can't sign a waiver to opt-out of the testing requirement, as is allowed for certain vaccinations.

Britta Greene / New Hampshire Public Radio

A handful of Claremont residents demonstrated outside the city’s high school Thursday, holding anti-bullying posters and asking students to sign a pledge stating they won’t bully in the future.

The demonstration comes after a highly publicized incident earlier this fall in which a young boy was allegedly attacked by local teenagers. The boy’s family says he was left to hang by a rope and nearly died.

Britta Greene/NHPR

Here’s one thing you might not know about the Upper Valley: it's home to hundreds of Puerto Rican dogs. 

That’s because of the relationship between one New Hampshire family and a shelter on the island of Vieques, off Puerto Rico’s eastern shore. 

It all started about five years ago, when Lyme resident Andrea Heitzman was visiting the island and spotted a small black dog on the street. He was a street dog, homeless. She immediately fell in love.

Britta Greene / NHPR

Inside Daddypops Tumble Inn Diner in Claremont, the owner’s daughter – Fallon Carter – is working behind the counter as she talks with her mom and a friend.

They’re discussing a recent incident in town that’s been all over the news. The family of a young biracial boy says local teenagers intentionally hanged their son in a lynching-style attack. He survived, but had to be airlifted to the hospital.

Britta Greene / NHPR

The parents of a teenager involved in the alleged attack of a young boy in Claremont say the incident was an accident, and was not racially motivated.

Their son was just joking around, they told Newsweek in an interview. He saw the boy standing on the picnic table and thought he'd scare him from behind, they said. He did not know there was a rope around the boy's neck. The kids had been playing with the rope and climbing trees, the parents explained.

Britta Greene / NHPR

Over the next several months, the Claremont schools will take a closer look at issues of discrimination and bullying in the district. This comes after an alleged racially motivated attack of a young boy in town by local teenagers.

Dartmouth’s Hopkins Center for the Arts staged two shows last weekend of “Antigone in Ferguson.” The play draws connections between the ancient Greek tragedy and the 2014 shooting of Michael Brown.

Conversation after the show touched on recent events just south of Hanover, in Claremont. The family of a young boy there alleges a group of local teenagers attempted to hang the child by a rope in a racially motivated attack. They say he nearly died.

A group of New Hampshire residents and sportsmen’s organizations is suing the Department of Environmental Services over boat access on Lake Sunapee.

The suit comes after Gov. Chris Sununu pulled the plug earlier this year on a decades-long plan for boat access at what’s known as the Wild Goose site on the lake’s southern shore. He did so by choosing to not renew a wetlands permit for the site.

The complaint, filed in Sullivan County Superior Court, argues that DES, not the governor, has the authority to decide on that permit.

Valley News - Jennifer Hauck, Pool

Dartmouth-Hitchcock officials say they’re reviewing all safety procedures following the fatal shooting of a 70-year-old patient Tuesday.

Speaking outside the hospital's administrative offices Wednesday afternoon, Chief Clinical Officer Ed Merrens said a swift response from staff and law enforcement allowed for minimal patient disruption. “We had a full day yesterday. We had a busy OR, birthing pavilion, medical units -- everything was going,” he said. “Even in our surgical intensive care unit, we had patients taken care of.”

DHMC

 

A man shot and killed his mother at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center in Lebanon on Tuesday, New Hampshire Attorney General Gordon MacDonald said.

Gov. Chris Sununu has asked the state Attorney General's office to help police in Claremont with the investigation of an alleged attack against a biracial boy in the city, according to a statement released by the governor's office Tuesday. 

Britta Greene / NHPR

The parking lot was overflowing at Claremont’s back-to-school fair this year, held at a playing field just outside of downtown. Families with young kids checked out the fire truck and race cars, and visited booths offering back-to-school info, giveaways and games.

One booth had a freebie no child was begging for: free on-site lead tests. 


Courtesy

The back-and-forth between Dartmouth faculty and College President Phil Hanlon continues over the school's response to comments by Mark Bray. Bray is a faculty member and has been a prominent speaker on the Antifa movement since the clashes in Charlottesville.

In a statement last month, President Hanlon distanced the college from Bray's comments around the role of violence in taking on white supremacy.

Courtesy of Crawford Notch Campground

The fall hunting season is now underway across the state. Starting Friday, hunting is open for black bears, Canada geese and gray squirrels. Deer and turkey season begins later this autumn.

New Hampshire Fish and Game officials have set a target population for black bears at just under 5,000. This year, they estimate there are more than 6,000 in the state. That means hunting restrictions will be fairly liberal -- good odds for those heading out to the woods.

Britta Greene / NHPR

Tony Strat stands in the grass outside his screen-printing studio in the Upper Valley, washing the ink off of used screens with a hose. Even though he’s scrubbed the screens down, shadows of  designs he’s printed are still visible. “Gender is a social construct,” one of them reads.

Strat, 26, is an artist, entrepreneur and athlete. He’s worked in finance and started his own skateboarding company. He's also transgender. He started his transition process last year.

Pages