US Congress

Kainaz Amaria / NPR

In our monthly check-in with political junkie Ken Rudin, we're covering some of the top national political stories of recent weeks, including the swearing in of a new Congress, the President holding the line on his priorities, and an ever-growing crop of presidential contender possibilities.

GUESTS:

2014 Primaries and Elections: A Look Ahead

Jul 9, 2014
meagan_taylor / Flickr/CC

With summer officially here, it’s not just the weather heating up, but the political season as well. There are polls, ads, debates being scheduled, and big-name politicians coming in to support candidates. There's also already some drama, with one contender dropping out and another’s residency being questioned.  We’re looking at how the U.S. Congress, Senate, and N.H. Governor races are shaping up so far.

GUESTS:

NPR's Mara Liasson

Mar 17, 2014
Stephen Voss / NPR

Mara Liasson will discuss the White House and upcoming elections, as well as how changes in both political parties over the past six years have affected such key issues as the Affordable Care Act, the debt-ceiling debate, and immigration reform.

GUESTS:

  • Mara Liasson – national political correspondent for NPR. She joined NPR in 1985 as a general assignment reporter, later working as a congressional correspondent, and then the White House correspondent.

LINKS:

afagen / Flickr Creative Commons

In mid-March, with the sap has hardly running, November seems a lifetime away. But in the political world, eight months goes by quickly, especially for those preparing for mid-term elections. Although the filing period isn’t until June, there’s already a solid list of Republicans hoping to face the three Democratic incumbents. In the 1st Congressional District, former Congressman Frank Guinta and former UNH business school Dean Dan Innis look to go against Carol Shea Porter. In Congressional District 2, state Rep.

Ann McLane Kuster / Flickr Creative Commons

Second District Congresswoman Ann McLane Kuster was swept into office in the last election amid a storm of anti-incumbent feeling in the Granite State. In her victory speech, she promised to work in the spirit of bipartisanship.

davidking via flickr Creative Commons

Ever feel like the only way things get done in Washington is if there's a crisis? You're not alone. Bipartisanism is driving moderates out of the Senate according to a recent editorial from the Star Tribune.  Charles Wheelan is senior lecturer at Dartmouth, and the author of several books including Naked Economics. His newest is called The Centrist Manifesto and it’s the basis for a new centrist party designed to break congressional gridlock, find consensus, and restore faith in American politics.

Politics Of The Shutdown

Oct 17, 2013
jessie owen / Flickr Creative Commons

Granite State politicians weigh in on the politics in Washington that led to the shutdown, as well as the way forward.

Guests:

  • Ray Buckley- Chairman of New Hampshire Democratic Party
  • Gene Chandler- Republican House Minority Leader from Bartlett.
  • Andy Smith - Director of the UNH Survey Center and Associate Professor of Political Science

Callout:

  • Tim Carter - Leader of the Lakes Region Tea Party
jacqueline.poggi / Flickr Creative Commons

With a partial Government closing now in effect – some services will continue, such as the military and the mail. But others won’t- from National forests and Parks to federally-backed loans.   We’ll look at the politics and the economics of this, and gauge reaction in the granite state.

GUESTS:

757Live via Flickr Creative Commons

The Constitution gives Congress the right to declare war and the President to wage it. Yet many presidents have taken military action, without involving lawmakers. President Obama’s recent decision to seek Congressional support for intervention in Syria has renewed debate over when and how we engage our military.  

Guests:

  • Buzz Scherr – Professor at UNH School of Law in Concord
  • Linda L. Fowler - Professor of Government and the Frank J. Reagan Chair in Policy Studies at Dartmouth College     
Ryan Lessard / NHPR

The New Hampshire Food Bank has been struggling to keep up with the demand of a growing number of residents. And these challenges might be compounded by budget cuts proposed by Congress.

Congressional Redistricting Moves Forward

Apr 11, 2012

New Hampshire lawmakers have reached agreement on a Congressional redistricting plan. With two incumbent Republicans in Congress, both wanted to keep their districts as GOP-leaning as possible.

Under the final plan, six towns will switch districts. Sanborton, Tilton and Campton move east from District 2 to District 1; while Deerfield, Northwood and Center Harbor will shift west to District 2.