vermont yankee

NRCgov / Flickr

If Vermont Yankee, the 620 megawatt nuclear power plant, and all of the spent nuclear fuel being stored on its site were to just up and vanish tomorrow, what would be left is a pretty good spot for a power plant.

Now that the plant is now offline and many are asking, what’s next? While the site of the power plant has a lot going for it, building something else where a nuclear reactor once stood is no easy task.

NRCgov / Flickr

When it comes to the economy in this part of New England, ignore the state borders, says Linda Dunlavey. She’s head of the Franklin Regional Council of Governments based in Greenfield, Massachusetts. Not far from where she sits, the Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power Plant in Windham County is about to shut down for a final time. She says she’s paying attention to the overlaps — of the towns she works with, and with nearby towns in Vermont, and Cheshire County, New Hampshire.

Listen to the full story, courtesy New England Public Radio via the New England News Exchange:

In just over a week Vermont Yankee nuclear power plant is set to close. It means the end of a long-running debate over the plant and nuclear energy in the Green Mountain State, but it could also mean the start of some economic challenges for the area surrounding the plant, including parts of New Hampshire's Monadnock Region.

NRC

Vermont Yankee has announced its official layoff numbers ahead of the nuclear power plant’s closing at the end of the year: 165 people will lose their jobs in January, and 48 of them live in New Hampshire.

Vermont Yankee has been winding down its staff for the past year. Some workers have retired, while 79 have taken jobs with other power plants owned by parent company Entergy.

Marty Cohn, Vermont Yankee’s spokesman, says these workers are well-equipped to enter the job market.

Via the NRC

The Vermont Yankee nuclear plant is out with a new estimate of what it will cost to decommission the reactor, manage high-level radioactive waste and restore the plant site.

And that figure — about $1.24 billion — is nearly double what plant owner Entergy Corp. currently has saved up in the plant's decommissioning fund.

A biomass plant has been proposed to occupy the site of the Vermont Yankee nuclear power plant, which is shutting down at the end of year.

The idea is in its infancy. The Brattleboro Reformer reports officials plan to organize a public forum to discuss the details.

The state has negotiated a detailed agreement with Entergy, owner of the nuclear plant, providing for millions of dollars for economic development and clean energy projects as well as a "timely decommissioning."

Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power Plant Will Shut Down In 2014

Aug 27, 2013

Entergy Corp. says it will shut down the Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power Station by end of 2014, ending a long legal battle with the state.

John Dillon, VPR News

Lawyers for Entergy and the state of Vermont faced off in a federal courtroom in New York on Monday in a case that will determine the state’s power to close the Vermont Yankee nuclear plant.

The nuclear power plant on the banks of the Connecticut River has been touted as a renewable energy source and criticized for its safety record. In recent months, both supporters and opponents have been turning out in force to debate the plant’s economic, environmental, and safety impacts, as legal battles continue in both federal and state arenas.

Guests

John Dillon - Reporter for Vermont Public Radio.

Vermont Yankee Debate Heats Up On Two Fronts

Oct 24, 2012
US Nuclear Regulatory Comission

The legal debate over the future of the Vermont Yankee nuclear plant is heating up at federal appeals court and at the state Public Service Board.

Vermont Yankee Opponents Say Water Permit Could Force Plant To Close

Jul 5, 2012

A loss late last month in federal appeals court has limited the state’s options to challenge Vermont Yankee’s operating license.