Vietnam

Jack Mallory

For many Americans, the Vietnam War is a long, complex, and oft-misunderstood chapter of American history. But the recent ten-part documentary by filmmakers Ken Burns and Lynn Novak stirred up a national discussion about Vietnam. We speak with four veterans of the war about the documentary, and their own experiences. 

(Scroll down to read the story of Natt King, another New Hampshire veteran who shared his story off the air.)

  This show was originally broadcast on Oct. 17, 2017.

"The Vietnam War" documentary

   

The Manchester VA is offering drop-in sessions for New Hampshire Vietnam veterans who are emotionally impacted by a documentary on the Vietnam War. The 10-part series by filmmaker Ken Burns is now airing on PBS.

New Hampshire Representative Steve Shurtleff of Concord served in Vietnam and says for many Vietnam vets, the wounds are still fresh.

Shurtleff served in Vietnam with the U.S. Army Military Police from July 1967 to July 1968. He recently watched a preview of "The Vietnam War" at the Red River Theatres. He says it brought back a lot of memories.

Michael Brindley/NHPR

The fifth and final "Welcome Home" ceremony for Vietnam Veterans will take place Saturday in Hudson. The event is hosted by the New Hampshire National Guard. 

When troops came back from fighting in Vietnam, they weren't universally welcomed. In some cases, they were actually scorned by those who opposed the war.

Now, however, Vietnam veterans are more widely recognized as having served their country honorably. More than a third of New Hampshire's veterans served during the Vietnam era.

Wikimedia Commons

One hundred years ago, President Wilson signed the Selective Service Act, as the nation joined World War One. Since then, the Act has been rewritten many times.  Today, we have a volunteer military but all young men must still register.  We looked at the history of conscription, and current debate over reviving the draft. 


Enduring Vietnam: An American Generation and Its War

May 26, 2017

The Vietnam War is largely recalled as a mistake, either in the decision to engage there or in the nature of the engagement.  Veterans of the war remain largely anonymous figures.  Enduring Vietnam recounts the experiences of the young Americans who fought in Vietnam and of families who grieved those who did not return. We talk with author James Wright about the “baby boomers” who grew up in the 1950s, why they went into the military,  how they describe serving in “Nam” and their experiences coming home.

GUEST:  James Wright is author and editor of several history books and a former history professor at Dartmouth College as well as former Dartmouth College President.

This program was originally broadcast on 4/27/17.


Courtesy University of New Hampshire

A mobile, half-size replica of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial Wall is currently on display at UNH.

The wall was escorted to campus this week by state and local police along with several Vietnam veteran motorcycle groups.

It’s currently parked on a campus lawn, visible from Main Street in Durham.

The wall has toured the country since 1984 to bring the memorial to people who may not be able to travel to Washington, D.C.

The tour is coordinated by a veterans group.

The wall will be on display at UNH until 8 am on Monday.

3.6.17: Overturning the SCOTUS & The Caped Crusade

Mar 6, 2017
clement127 via flickr Creative Commons / https://flic.kr/p/QSzTZ4

On today's show:

L: Gerald R. Ford Presidential Museum|Public domain

This week marks the 40th anniversary of the Fall of Saigon, and “Operation Babylift” which evacuated thousands of supposedly orphaned South Vietnamese children who were then relocated to homes in American and beyond. On today’s show we’ll revisit the controversial program and get a firsthand account from one of the airlifted children.

Stories From Dartmouth's Vietnam Veterans

May 26, 2014

In a new book, these veterans relate their experiences: from harrowing jungle combat to the dullness of desk-duty.  They also reflect on the drama surrounding the war in this country and on its legacy today.  We talk with the editor of this book and several veterans whose stories are included.

GUESTS: 

© Don McCullin, courtesy of Hamiltons Gallery, London.

America’s ambivalence about the Vietnam conflict began with the photograph of a monk, engulfed in flames, sinking to the pavement on a Saigon street, and another image, capturing the moment a uniformed officer fires a bullet into the head of a man in a plaid shirt, and still later, a naked girl,  screaming as she runs from a cloud of black smoke.

These iconic pictures are among those collected in “Visual Dispatches from the Vietnam War” on view at the Currier Museum of Art until November 11. The show’s curator, Kurt Sundstrom, talked with us about the show and its groundbreaking images.

Like so many fathers being celebrated this weekend, Lieutenant colonel Donald C Lundquist served his country in battle. In 1967, the army assigned Don as executive officer of a squadron protecting a jet fighter base at Chui Lai from the Vietcong. Don found a novel way to stay in touch with his wife Ruth and his young daughter, Jacqui, who were living with Ruth’s parents in Germany…Jacqui Lundquist doesn’t remember her father, but she came to know him through the more than 300 letters and hours of audio tapes recorded in his hooch in Chui Lai. 

Defense Secretary Leon Panetta is trying to send a message during a weeklong trip to the Asia-Pacific region: The U.S. is back.

Panetta continues Monday to Vietnam, where he's hoping to build stronger defense ties. The trip began Sunday with a historic return to a key crossroads of the Vietnam War: Cam Ranh Bay.

Panetta boarded a little ferry boat Sunday in the beautiful natural harbor north of Ho Chi Minh City. On board, he asked about his destination: the USNS Richard E. Byrd, a big supply ship docked on the other side of the bay.