Voting Laws

White House Livestream

Secretary of State Bill Gardner used his opening remarks at the inaugural meeting of the Trump administration’s voting integrity commission to call for closer examination of the value of photo ID laws and other measures that, he says, improve public confidence in elections.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Secretary of State Bill Gardner is on his way to Washington to participate in the first official meeting of the Trump administration’s Presidential Advisory Commission on Election Integrity, scheduled for Wednesday.

NHPR Staff

A legal challenge to the New Hampshire’s plans to share voter data with the Trump administration has been put on hold, pending other legal challenges at the federal level.

Vox Efx / Flickr Creative Commons

Governor Chris Sununu has signed into law a Republican-backed bill that adds new requirements for proving voter eligibility.

The law will require those registering within 30 days of an election to provide additional documentation, tightening the definition of domicile for voting purposes.

Sununu signed the bill into law with little fanfare Monday, choosing not to hold a ceremonial signing as he's done with other legislation.

Sheryl Rich-Kern for NHPR

Update: The hearing was postponed Tuesday morning at the request of the New Hampshire ACLU, pending further legal action at the federal level.

One of the first legal challenges related to the Trump administration’s request for state voter files will go before a judge in Nashua Tuesday, as part of a lawsuit filed last week by the New Hampshire ACLU and two state lawmakers.

Gov. Chris Sununu says turning over the state’s voter information (or, at least, what’s included in public voter checklists) to a Presidential Advisory Commission on Election Integrity is a step toward restoring confidence in the nation’s elections.

Allegra Boverman / NHPR

Two New Hampshire lawmakers from different sides of the aisle are asking a judge to block the Secretary of State from handing over voter information to President Trump’s election integrity commission.

Weekly N.H. News Roundup: July 7, 2017

Jul 7, 2017

We'll have the latest on the controversy over the request  from the Presidential Commission on Electoral Integrity for voter data from the states.  The American Civil Liberties Union of New Hampshire sues to bar New Hampshire Secretary of State William Gardner from disclosing New Hampshire voter information.  The re-building of I-93 from Manchester to Salem may include a fourth lane, which could also cut five to eight million dollars along the way.  A 14-year-old student raped in a hallway at Manchester High School West in 2015 may sue the school district. And it's a bumper year for strawberries.


Allegra Boverman for NHPR

When New Hampshire Secretary of State Bill Gardner said he intended to share information from the state’s public voter checklists with a newly launched Trump administration commission, plenty of people were quick to decry the move as an “invasion of privacy.”

The President's Election Integrity Commission's request for state voter checklist information set off lots of concerns about voter privacy. Some states, including Maine, have refused to cooperate.  Others, like New Hampshire, have said they'll comply, but only with information that's already publicly available. 


Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Governor Sununu says New Hampshire should turn over public information on voters to a Trump administration voter fraud commission, a view shared by the state's top election official, Secretary of State Bill Gardner. But Gardner says the matter is under review by the Attorney General.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

This story has been updated.

Secretary of State Bill Gardner says New Hampshire will turn over publicly available voter checklist information to the Trump administration’s Presidential Advisory Commission on Election Integrity, of which he is a member — but the state's still determining how it will share that information, and whether it will ask the commission to pay any money for it.

Courtesy photo

Special elections always present a challenge for campaigns — and even more so in the summer, when vacations and other activities can easily take precedence over politics in the minds of most voters. With this in mind, those involved in the upcoming District 16 State Senate race are pushing absentee voting as a way to remind voters to participate.

Tracy Lee Carroll, NHPR

A Republican-backed bill to add tougher scrutiny on voters who don’t have the right kind of paperwork to prove they live in the state sailed through the House of Representatives Thursday and is headed to Gov. Chris Sununu for a signature. 

justgrimes / Flickr Creative Commons

It’s been a busy session for anyone with an interest in New Hampshire elections, with dozens of bills filed to tinker with different parts of the state’s voting systems. 

Most of the proposals filed this session didn’t make it out of committee or have otherwise lost steam, for now at least. But on Thursday, three significant pieces of voting legislation will be up for a final vote in the House.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

House lawmakers are set to vote Thursday on a Republican-sponsored bill that would stiffen residency requirements for voters who register in the month before an election. Under the bill, those voters would be required to provide additional documentation to show where they live and that they intend to stay in the state.

Republican Barbara Griffin is chair of the House Election Law Committee, which is recommending the bill’s passage. Speaking to NHPR’s Morning Edition, Griffin says the bill ensures the integrity of the voting process.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

  New Hampshire Secretary of State Bill Gardner says he has heard almost nothing from the White House in the two weeks since he agreed to join President Donald Trump's election integrity commission.

Gardner told the Concord Monitor he got a call May 10 letting him know that the commission's creation was going public but he doesn't know when it will start meeting, how much time it will take or what his role includes.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

The House Election Law committee voted along party lines Tuesday to recommend an updated version of voting bill SB3, a Republican-sponsored bill to add tougher enforcement for voters registering within 30 days of an election.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

In a lawsuit filed Wednesday, the New Hampshire branch of the American Civil Liberties Union is taking issue with a state law that allows election officials to toss voters’ absentee ballots without notifying those voters or giving them a chance to appeal the decision.

Last fall, University of New Hampshire student Rachel Berg was one of the more than 3,000 people in Durham who registered to vote on Election Day. And she came prepared.

“I had to bring a few forms of ID, I don’t remember exactly what,” Berg recalled while sitting in a corner of the UNH student center last week. “License, I think. School ID. And maybe my passport, just to be safe.”

Casey McDermott, NHPR

Members of the House Election Law Committee heard hours of testimony Tuesday on a voting bill that would impose new residency requirements on people registering to vote within 30 days of an election — with impassioned testimony from those on both sides of the debate.

justgrimes / Flickr Creative Commons

After clearing the Senate along party lines, a Republican-sponsored bill to add new requirements for voters registering within 30 days of an election is up for a public hearing in the House Tuesday morning.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

New Hampshire House lawmakers are set to consider a Republican bill that would add new requirements for proving voter eligibility.

The measure, SB 3, cleared the state Senate last week along party lines.

The bill would require those registering close to an election to provide additional documentation, tightening the definition of domicile for voting purposes.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

A Republican bill adding new requirements for proving voter eligibility has cleared the state Senate along party lines. The measure would require create more stringent verification requirements for people registering to vote close to an election.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

There’s plenty of debate in New Hampshire right now around the question of who should be allowed to vote here. A big part of that lies in figuring out when — and why — a person calls New Hampshire their home. Answering that question, however, isn’t always straightforward.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

A bill that would hire a full-time attorney to enforce state election laws  unanimously cleared the Senate Thursday. 

Currently the state has one half-time employee charged with investigating potential voter fraud.

Senator Bette Lasky, who sponsored the bill, says this workload is “virtually impossible” for one person to do part-time.

The state senate voted Thursday against a bill that would have allowed people to register online to vote. 

A Senate committee had already voted against the bill- which only seemed to strengthen the conviction of Senator Lou D’Allesandro as he argued for using federal funds to establish an online voter registration system.

UNH

  As lawmakers in Concord debate changes to the state’s election laws, college students in New Hampshire are raising concerns about how they might be affected.

Of the nearly 6,000 new voters who registered in November using an out-of-state ID, many were concentrated in New Hampshire’s college towns.

Logan Shannon / NHPR

Secretary of State Bill Gardner says he would not support legislation if he believed it would hurt voter turnout. And as he sees it, a new bill that would impose new requirements on voters who register within 30 days of an election does not run the risk of doing that.

NHPR Staff

Republican lawmakers have proposed dozens of individual bills to tighten up New Hampshire election laws this year, but one new proposal coming forward this week would on its own enact a number of changes in what’s required for voters to register and how officials are expected to verify those credentials.

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