Voting Laws

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

  Members of the public can weigh in this week on a bill encompassing several election law changes.

Republican Sen. Regina Birdsell is the prime sponsor of legislation that's up for a hearing Tuesday in Concord.

NHPR Staff

U.S. Sen. Jeanne Shaheen says she's disappointed that Gov. Chris Sununu hasn't been more forceful in rebutting voter fraud allegations in New Hampshire.

President Donald Trump says he lost New Hampshire in November because thousands of people came by bus to vote against him. Shaheen, a Democrat, says Trump is making that up. On Wednesday, she told reporters that it's disappointing that Sununu — a Republican who was elected in November — hasn't been stronger about pushing back.

Logan Shannon / NHPR

While President Trump and some of his allies perpetuated the (unverified and unsubstantiated) idea that out-of-state voters are being sent across the border en masse to throw New Hampshire elections, we were wondering: What can we actually know about the people who are showing up to register for the first time on Election Day?

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

  Party leaders on both sides of the aisle are defending New Hampshire's electoral system in the wake of another unsubstantiated claim by President Donald Trump that there's massive voter fraud happening in the state.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

While Representative Norman Silber, a first-term Republican from Gilford, initially hoped to get rid of same-day voter registration, he now says it seems like more trouble than it’s worth at this time.

Casey McDermott, NHPR

At first glance, one of the voting bills introduced by Representative David Bates this week would seem to be just a minor change, removing just four words from an existing statute.

The Windham Republican wants to strike part of the state law defining what it means to be a resident or inhabitant, or what it means to claim residency — specifically, the part that extends that definition to include people who intend to remain in New Hampshire "for the indefinite future." Those definitions, in turn, are used to help decide who’s eligible to vote in New Hampshire.

justgrimes / Flickr Creative Commons

It’s shaping up to be a busy week for anyone following potential changes to the state’s election laws. At least 17 such bills are on deck for public hearings before House and Senate committees — a majority of which seek to restrict existing rules around voting.

Casey McDermott, NHPR

Lawmakers heard input Tuesday on a bill that, if left unchanged, could drastically expand the power of the Secretary of State’s office.

Allegra Boverman / NHPR

It’s tradition in New Hampshire for the new Governor to meet and greet his constituents following the inauguration. The reception line lets voters come face to face, if only for a moment, with the state’s next chief executive.

Most New Hampshire residents will never meet their governor. But on Inauguration Day, after the swearing in and the speech, the pomp and ceremony, the newly minted governor grants an audience to anyone willing to wait in line.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

From changes in voting registration to changes to party primaries or the Electoral College, New Hampshire lawmakers are preparing a slew of bills aimed at reforming the state’s elections.

In all, at least 40 bills aimed at tinkering with the state’s election laws are in the works for 2017.

Casey McDermott, NHPR

It’s not unusual for local officials across New Hampshire to be asked to turn over emails or other records under the state’s right-to-know law. In Manchester, City Clerk Matt Normand estimates his office receives about 100 such requests each year.

It is unusual, however, for a city to be on the receiving end of a public records request from the state itself.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Bill Gardner, best known as the guardian of New Hampshire’s First in the Nation Presidential Primary,  was elected to his 21st consecutive term as Secretary of State Wednesday.

A federal appeals court has upheld a 2014 New Hampshire law that puts limits on how long third parties have to collect the necessary signatures to petition their way onto a general election ballot.

The Libertarian Party of New Hampshire urged a three-judge panel in Boston to strike down the law, saying it could prevent third-party candidates from getting on the ballot.

The panel agreed Friday with a judge who found the law creates reasonable restrictions justified by the state's interest in requiring parties to demonstrate a sufficient level of support.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

President-Elect Trump's statement that "massive voter fraud" occurred in New Hampshire this election has been widely rejected by state officials. But, the issue itself, of the potential for voter fraud, has gained a lot of attention in recent years. We discuss New Hampshire's ballot system. 


Allegra Boverman for NHPR

New Hampshire polling places were under plenty of scrutiny on Election Day.

The attorney general’s office dispatched 50 people to polling locations across the state to keep an eye out for problems. The U.S. Department of Justice had its own Election Day hotline set up to field questions and potential complaints. Officials in the Secretary of State’s office, meanwhile, also kept an eye out for issues.

And, despite what President-Elect Donald Trump tweeted Sunday night, nowhere is there any evidence that large groups of people were voting illegally in New Hampshire.

SAUL LOEB / AP

President-elect Donald Trump is alleging there was quote-serious voter fraud in New Hampshire and other states during the election earlier this month, despite no evidence to back up such a claim.

Trump narrowly lost New Hampshire to Hillary Clinton, though won the election despite losing the overall popular vote.

In a series of tweets Sunday, Trump claimed he would have won the popular vote had it not been for the quote-millions of people who voted illegally.

Trump also claimed there was serious voter fraud in New Hampshire, Virginia, and California.

The Electoral College: Yea or Nay?

Nov 18, 2016
NHPR

Although rare, the winner of the Oval Office can lose the national popular vote, as we saw this year.  And that's caused many Americans to ask: Does my vote count?  The answer is complicated, and changing the system would be tough. Still, there's no shortage of ideas.  


Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Governor-elect Republican Chris Sununu says he wants to repeal same-day voter registration in New Hampshire.

“Most states don’t have it. There’s a reason. It can cause problems,” Sununu said, speaking to NHPR’s Morning Edition.

Casey McDermott, NHPR

When New Hampshire voters walk into the polls Tuesday, they’ll be greeted by a process that has remained largely unchanged for decades: paper ballots, filled out by hand, with voter rolls monitored by pencil-wielding clerks. And the way the state’s top election official sees it, there’s little reason to mess with a good thing.

Getty Images

When voters across New Hampshire head to the polls Tuesday, they may want to leave their campaign swag at home.

That's because a new state law will be in effect that bans people from wearing anything into a polling site that promotes a particular candidate.

Hannah McCarthy

Chelsea Clinton is campaigning for her mother, Hillary Clinton, in New Hampshire on Friday. She'll make stops at Keene State and Dartmouth College, just the latest in a series of college campus visits for the Clinton campaign in the state.

The youth could mean a boost for Clinton in the New Hampshire polls -- but only if college-aged voters bother to cast their ballot. 

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

    

After suggesting that Democrats were abusing the state’s same-day voter registration rules by “busing” in out-of-state voters, Chris Sununu clarified that he does not believe voters are being literally bused across the New Hampshire border en masse to participate in the elections — but he does favor stronger residency requirements to prevent potential abuses at the polls.

Ahead of Election Day next week, election officials around the country are checking and double-checking their equipment to make sure the results are calculated accurately.

Those officials are under increased scrutiny this year with Donald Trump and his allies claiming the voting system could be "rigged" in favor of Democrats. So election administrators around the country are opening the doors to the public to show off the multiple layers of safeguards in the ballot-counting process.

Miichael Brindley

There’s been a lot of talk about the importance of the ground game is in this presidential election. But who are the people knocking on doors trying to get out the vote?

After we heard from GOP canvassers last week, NHPR's Morning Edition host Rick Ganley spent a recent morning in Goffstown with a volunteer going door to door, trying to get out the vote for Democrats.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Republican gubernatorial candidate Chris Sununu is accusing New Hampshire Democrats of orchestrating voter fraud in the state.

During an appearance Monday on the Howie Carr Show, Sununu claimed Democrats are busing in Massachusetts residents and using the state’s same-day registration law to get them to vote in New Hampshire.

Sean Hurley

We recently aired a story about a farm stand in Ashland with a unique amenity – an outhouse that owner Chris Owens had converted into a makeshift voting booth. While the latest polls show an ever tightening Presidential race, NHPR’s Sean Hurley says the results from the outhouse indicate a clear victory for one candidate. 

Chris Owens sits beside an outdoor woodstove at the back of his farm stand.  At his feet, his cat, Sid Vicious and on his lap - a box full of ballots, freshly collected from…his outhouse.

One question on many people's minds is whether polling places will be disrupted on Election Day. There are concerns that vigilantes, armed with cameras and notebooks, will intimidate voters they suspect of committing fraud. Such groups insist they'll follow the law, but civil rights groups are on alert just in case.

Michael Brindley

In the weeks leading up to the election, NHPR reporters will travel throughout the state to talk with people on the ground about what’s shaping their votes.

NHPR’s Michael Brindley caught up last week with libertarian Steve O’Brien.

He’s 29 years old and was attending a campaign rally in Keene to hear from libertarian Bill Weld, presidential candidate Gary Johnson’s running mate.

USFWS Mountain-Prairie via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/EJSXqM

Each year, eight-hundred thousand Latinos turn 18 in the United States - add up the 4 years since the last election, and you've got a whole lot of young voters. Today, a new app designed to increase turnout among young Latinos - an crucial block that haven't always shown up to the polls. 

Plus, the author of The Way Things Work - a quintessential coffee-table book from 1988 made up of detailed illustrations to explain everything from catapults to calculators. The classic book just got an update for the digital age.

And conservation by drone - we'll hear about a program designed to save black-footed ferrets from the plague by air-dropping vaccines.

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