xlibber via flickr Creative Commons / https://flic.kr/p/c6iABC

Serving today’s ultra-rich may not be so much about finicky Downton Abbey-esque table settings, but it often involves lots of unexpected duties. On today’s show, we’ll talk to a writer who enrolled at the nation’s foremost “Butler Boot Camp,” where students learn to navigate the whims and habits of today’s elite. Then, the story of Sylvester Graham and his signature snack: the graham cracker, which was borne out of philosophy that promoted chastity, temperance, and the prohibition of alcohol, tobacco, caffeine and spices. All of which could excite our animal desires. 

Iowa Digital Library via flickr Creative Commons / flic.kr/p/dg8YuC

While the U.S. leads the world in dental innovation, many Americans are unable to afford basic dental care, and as a result, suffer from health and psychological consequences. On today’s show: the high price of poor teeth.

Then, stretching your artistic muscles has been shown to reduce stress and increase positive thinking, but for many people, being more creative sounds like an arduous task. We’ll talk to an artist who makes a bold case for dropping the excuses, and picking up the sketchpad.

Listen to the full show and click Read more for individual segments.

via vertu.com

We spoke to Gabriel Roth, who took the Aster for a test drive at one of Vertu’s upscale boutiques and wrote about the phone for Fast Company, "The Cadillac Bentley of Cell Phones." The Aster starts at a meager $6900 for the 'entry-level' calf leather model and rises to $9700 for a bright pink ostrich skin model.

Starkey International Institute of Household Management

The number of U.S. billionaires doubled in the past decade, and those hedge fund managers, CEOs and celebrities need trained staff to manage their many estates. That’s the goal of Starkey International Institute of Household Management in Denver. For about $20,000, students can learn how to oversee and care for today’s great estates.  Joining us is freelance writer John P. Davidson. He attended the Butler Boot Camp at Starkey and wrote about it for the January issue of Harper’s magazine.

In a new book called “Saved”, author Ben Hewitt explores a different way of looking at wealth. Rather than dwelling on monetary standards and what can be lost financially, Hewitt writes through experience of what can be gained when we prioritize personal relationships, community cooperation, and connectedness to the environment.


  • Ben Hewitt - Vermont based author. His new book is called "Saved: How I Quit Worrying about Money and Became the Richest Guy in the World"

In 2006, Wells Fargo became the first bank to offer one-on-one psychological consults to wealthy customers. Unlike the counseling offered for debt-ridden, financially insecure Americans, Wells Fargo’s therapists were there to address emotional issues associated with having a huge portfolio. The service is becoming an industry standard for banks and brokerage firms.

The Cow Loophole

Mar 27, 2012
Photo by No oooming! via Flickr

When I think of tax evasion or corporate loopholes, I think paper shredders and mumbling accountants huddled over ledgers – not green pastures and high white fences… and yet, for wealthy landowners looking to avoid the brunt of high property taxes through agricultural credits and breaks, all it takes to save millions is a few stray heifers, or a handful of goats.   Pat Garofalo is economic policy editor at Think Progress, and the author a recent op-ed called