Biologists still don't know what killed a young humpback whale that washed ashore in New Hampshire.

The 45-foot-long whale, named Snow Plow, was discovered June 26 by fishermen who first spotted its corpse floating 20 miles off the shore.

Snow Plow was one of hundreds of whales that scientists had been tracking for years. She's part of several pods that return to the Gulf of Maine to feed every summer.


Scientists conducting a necropsy of a dead whale that washed up in Rye Monday say they have yet to find any indication of what killed the 18-year-old humpback. They found no sign of a hematoma, which would have indicated that the whale had been struck by a ship, but they would continue to take tissue samples to see if any disease can be detected.

julierohloff via Flickr Creative Commons

With the weather warming up across New England, people are heading for the coast. Today Word of Mouth hits the high seas. First we'll ponder the unfathomable push and pull of the open ocean. Then, we’ll speak to an artist who created the world’s first submerged sculpture park, his underwater gallery not only attracts art-lovers, but serves as an artificial reef. Plus, farmed fish now exceeds beef production. Have fish farmers learned from the mistakes of the meat industry?

Kurk Dorsey's "Whales & Nations"

Mar 19, 2014
Univ of Washington Press

The new book "Whales and Nations" by UNH professor Kurkpatrick Dorsey explores the history of international conservation efforts through the lens of the commercial whaling industry. We’ll talk with him about the whaling in the 20th century and why international diplomacy failed to regulate commercial whaling.