Sean Hurley

New Hampshire’s two model sailboat clubs got together in Wolfeboro for a regatta known as the Sasquatch Footy.

Bob Rice sits on a bench overlooking the wind scratched surface of Wolfeboro's Back Bay Harbor.  He watches the remote control sailboats tack back and forth and pivot around the floating white marks.  

Oh I think it's dandy.  You get boats of this size and more people can play with them.

Sean Hurley

Although Police Commissioner Robert Copeland submitted a letter of resignation earlier today, the people of Wolfeboro worry about the possible long-term impact the racial controversy could have on their town. NHPR's Sean Hurley spoke with residents over the weekend, before Copeland’s resignation and looks more closely at what led to today’s events.

On Sunday Joanne Parise sat on the shore of Wolfeboro Bay.  On nearby Main Street, families lined up for ice cream, gazed in shop windows, and consulted maps and guidebooks.  The summer tourist season has already begun. 

The iconic sign welcoming visitors to Wolfeboro, NH
Goldeneye / Flickr Creative Commons

Wolfeboro Police Commissioner Robert Copeland has resigned, according to the town police department. 

This move follows days of controversy after reports last week that he publicly used a racial slur to describe President Obama.  Copeland admitted to using the term when a resident sent him an email complaint, writing back, “For this I do not apologize—he meets and exceeds my criteria for such.”

Tim Golden / Flickr Creative Commons

The Wolfeboro Board of Selectmen and Town Manager have posted a statement on the town's website condemning comments by local Police Commissioner Robert Copeland, and asking him to resign.   This comes after news reports earlier this week detailed racist comments by Copeland.

Goldeneye via Flickr CC

New Hampshire officials are getting hit with calls, emails and tweets reacting to racist comments made by a town police commissioner.

Jim Bouley, mayor of the capital city of Concord, said the reaction from as far away as California included threats to cancel vacations in New Hampshire. The calls started Thursday after news reports detailed comments by Wolfeboro Police Commissioner Robert Copeland, who admitted using the N-word to describe President Barack Obama.

Dave Delay via Flickr/Creative Commons

Mitt Romney is off the campaign trail this week. He’s vacationing at his home in Wolfeboro, New Hampshire, but the Republican presidential candidate is set to march in the town’s 4th of July parade.

And that’s likely to bring more attention than usual to Wolfeboro and its festivities this Independence Day.

Grand Marshal Harold Chamberlin has organized Wolfeboro’s 4th of July parade for 17 years. He tells All Things Considered host Brady Carlson about the parade and whether Romney's participation means any changes to his work.