World War II

Wikimedia Commons

He was governor of New Hampshire, the first head of the Social Security Administration, and U.S. ambassador to Great Britain during World War II. Yet John Gilbert Winant remains little known among Americans. We unearth the history of this unsung Granite Stater and hear about an effort to memorialize his contributions.

We're sitting down with Lynne Olson, author of new book "Those Angry Days: Roosevelt, Lindbergh, and America’s Fight Over World War II, 1939-1945." We'll discuss the bitter debate leading up American involvement in World War Two, a critical time in U.S. History.


Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Dustin W. Sisco / U.S. Navy

 In line with national tradition, Governor Maggie Hassan proclaimed Saturday "Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day'' to mark the 72nd commemoration of the attack that drew the United States into World War II.   Hassan  directed flags in the state to be flown at half-staff.   The attack by planes launched from Japanese aircraft carriers on Dec. 7, 1941, devastated the American naval fleet stationed at the Pearl Harbor base in Hawaii.       More than 2,000 members of the U.S. military died in the attack.   

There’s not a ton to look at in Los Alamos, New Mexico these days, but one of the most terrifying and iconic series of pictures in the history of the human race were once taken there, a little over 65 years ago, when a group of pioneer scientists photographed the world’s first atomic bomb test. They captured a speck of light, that turned into a snow-globe burning hotter than the surface of the sun, that turned into a mushroom cloud, now a universal symbol of epic destruction.  

Jonathan Fetter-Vorm is co-founder of Two Fine Chaps, a graphic imprint dedicated to adapting and illustrating classic works of literature and natural science… he’s also the author and illustrator of Trinity: A Graphic History of the First Atomic Bomb.