Writers

Word of Mouth
12:16 pm
Wed May 28, 2014

5. 28. 14: Tacky Museum Gift Shops and Letters Worth Reading

Credit Scott Lynch/ Gothamist

The gift shop at The National September 11 Memorial Museum has sparked controversy for such keepsakes as: a plush FDNY rescue dog and “survivor tree” earrings. While many find the items tasteless, the impulse to commemorate is as old as the country itself. NHPR's Brady Carlson takes us on a historical tour of tone-deaf keepsakes, from toy hand grenades to Confederate flag throw pillows. Plus, we'll speak to the founder of Letters of Note about the beauty and power of handwritten correspondence. 

Listen to the full show and click Read more for individual segments

5. 28. 2014 Full Show

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Word of Mouth
1:28 pm
Thu October 17, 2013

Sports Writer Stefan Fatsis Experiences A Few Seconds Of Panic

Forty-eight years ago writer George Plimpton infiltrated pro-football when he joined the Detroit Lions as a backup quarterback. Plimpton chronicled the experience in his 1965 book Paper Lion. Writer Stefan Fatsis followed in Plimpton’s cleated footsteps when he wrangled his way into the Denver Bronco’s training camp as place kicker in 2008. I spoke with Stefan in 2010 about his short but entertaining tenure in the NFL and his book about the experience called A Few Seconds of Panic.

Stefan Fatsis is a sports writer, a frequent contributor on NPR’s all things considered and a panelist on Slate’s sports podcast, “Hang Up and Listen.”

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Writers On A New England Stage
4:06 pm
Thu September 26, 2013

Margaret Atwood

Author Margaret Atwood
Credit Courtesy the Lavin Agency

Margaret Atwood’s novels are imaginative and  satirical, and her post-apocalyptic predictions eerily accurate. Atwood has just finished her Maddaddam trilogy, set after a bio-engineered plague has wiped out a wantonly consumerist America governed by corporations.

Atwood talks about her latest novel, and then sits down for a conversation and questions from the audience for this edition of Writers On A New England Stage, a co-production of NHPR and The Music Hall in Portsmouth.

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Word of Mouth
10:01 am
Thu September 19, 2013

The Rebranding Of Sylvia Plath

Credit Image courtesy Smith College

This year marks the 50th anniversary of poet Sylvia Plath’s death by suicide, the singular lens through which many readers and academics have viewed her life, writing, and marriage. Now, a new generation is re-discovering Plath from a fresh perspective, one not colored by her sad and macabre death. 

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Word of Mouth
10:58 am
Tue September 3, 2013

Great (And Famous!) Artists Who Kept Their Day Jobs

Poet T.S. Eliot was also a banker!
Credit Courtesy The Poetry Foundation

Minimalist composer Philip Glass is widely acknowledged as one of the late 20th Century’s most influential music-makers.  He’s worked with artists, musicians and filmmakers from David Bowie to Woody Allen, and famously collaborated with theater director Robert Wilson on the landmark opera “Einstein on the Beach” in 1976. Even after “Einstein,” Glass didn’t quit his day job as a New York cabby and some-time plumber…he was once called to install a dishwasher at the SoHo loft of a very shocked Robert Hughes, who was then the art critic for Time.

Here to talk about some other famous artists who stayed in their workaday jobs even after making their mark as an artist. Clay Wirestone, Arts Editor for the Concord Monitor and contributor to Mental Floss.

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