2016 Elections

Coverage of the 2016 races in New Hampshire, from the White House to the State House.

Wednesday is the deadline for candidates for state elected office to file campaign finance reports, detailing how much money they’ve raised and spent since the primary.

 

But these reports will give us only a glimpse of how the political dollars are flowing this year.

 

Following trends in recent elections, outside groups are expected to make a considerable investment to try and sway voters before they go to the polls less than three weeks from now.

 

Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

Wednesday night is the third and final presidential debate, and marks the last chance for Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton to make their case to voters on a national stage.

Kathy Sullivan of Manchester is a member of Democratic National Committee.

She joined NHPR’s Morning Edition to talk about the debate.

SAUL LOEB / AP

  Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton take the stage Wednesday night in Las Vegas for the third and final presidential debate.

Republican National Committeewoman Juliana Bergeron of Keene joined NHPR’s Morning Edition to talk about the debate and what she’s hoping to hear from Trump.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

The way Secretary of State Bill Gardner sees it, Granite State elections have gone on under dire circumstances before. This year, he thinks New Hampshire will be able to handle whatever’s in store this year on Election Day.

www.lawrenceforcongress.com

Republican candidate for Congress Jim Lawrence provided details on his business background in an interview with the Union Leader, after a report by NHPR into Lawrence’s business record. 

Todd Bookman/NHPR

After a surprise strong showing in last month’s GOP gubernatorial primary, Frank Edelblut is back on the campaign trail, backing his former rival Chris Sununu.

And while he’s not commenting on his political ambitions, the move suggests Edelblut could have more elections in his future.

Let's make one thing clear: Three weeks out from this election, Hillary Clinton is winning — and it's not close.

Yes, people still have to vote, but if Democratic groups come out — and the Trump scorched-earth campaign is more like a white flag than an actual strategy — Hillary Clinton will be the next president of the United States unless something drastic changes between now and Election Day.

The month of October has been about as bad as could be for Trump. Let's recap. There was:

- The leaked audio of Trump's comments bragging about kissing and groping women,

New Hampshire is still considered a swing state, despite a trend toward Democrats in the last few presidential elections. But when you look further down the ballot, there are relatively few districts that can still be called battlegrounds—most are reliably red or blue. One of the last ones left is a long slice of the Seacoast—State Senate District 24. NHPR’s Natasha Haverty reports on how two candidates are working to tip the scales there.


Donald Trump is warning that the election will be rigged. He has precisely zero evidence to back up that claim. But he has a remarkably receptive audience.

Around 30 percent of Americans have "little or no confidence" that votes will be counted accurately — and Trump's voters are far less confident about that than Clinton's.

Paige Sutherland/NHPR

Former President Bill Clinton campaigned for his wife Hillary in New Hampshire on Monday. At his first stop at Dartmouth College, he stressed that America’s future remains bright.

Jessica Hunt, NHPR

Jim Lawrence is running for Congress in District 2  in New Hampshire. He’s a Republican, going up against incumbent Democrat, Ann McLane Kuster. His pitch to voters relies heavily on his record as what he calls "a small business owner."  But it’s hard to get much detail on what exactly that record entails.

Paige Sutherland/NHPR

The latest polls show Hillary Clinton leading Donald Trump by about four percentage points in New Hampshire — closer than in many other battleground states.  And for Trump supporters here in the state, a week of increasing allegations didn’t keep them away from a weekend rally in Portsmouth.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Donald Trump is back in New Hampshire for a rally in Portsmouth on Saturday afternoon.

This is the first time the Republican presidential nominee has been in the Granite State since a 2005 video surfaced showing him boasting of groping women. 

NHPR Staff

A WBUR poll of likely voters in New Hampshire finds Democrat Hillary Clinton still leads Republican Donald Trump, but unlike in many other states, where her lead has gotten a bit more comfortable, her lead in New Hampshire has narrowed. For more on the poll, we turn to Steve Koczela, president of MassINC Polling Group, which conducted the survey for WBUR. He spoke with NHPR's All Things Considered host Peter Biello.

By how much does Hillary Clinton lead Donald Trump—and what do you think this shift says about the state of the campaigns?

CREDIT DREW ANGERER/GETTY IMAGES

Two new polls show Democrat Hillary Clinton maintaining her lead over Republican Donald Trump in New Hampshire.

A UMass Lowell/7News poll released Thursday found 45 percent of likely voters backing Clinton, and 39 percent backing Trump. Libertarian Gary Johnson had 9 percent support in the poll.

In the survey of 517 likely voters conducted Oct. 7-11, 4 percent of voters said they were still undecided.

Michael Brindley

In the weeks leading up to the election, NHPR reporters will travel throughout the state to talk with people on the ground about what’s shaping their votes.

NHPR’s Michael Brindley caught up last week with libertarian Steve O’Brien.

He’s 29 years old and was attending a campaign rally in Keene to hear from libertarian Bill Weld, presidential candidate Gary Johnson’s running mate.

Paige Sutherland/NHPR

First Lady Michelle Obama hosted a rally for Hillary Clinton Thursday afternoon at Southern New Hampshire University in Manchester.

But Obama's speech didn’t focus on Clinton but rather on Donald Trump’s treatment of women.

www.lawrenceforcongress.com

For the latest in our series of “Conversations with the Candidates” leading up to Election Day, NHPR is sitting down with Republican Jim Lawrence to talk about his bid for New Hampshire’s 2nd Congressional District Seat — and we’re looking for your questions.

National security has proven to be a pivotal issue in this year's Senate race between Sen. Kelly Ayotte and Gov. Maggie Hassan.

Ayotte, a Republican, has cast herself as a strong advocate for the nation's security, pointing to her record in the Senate. Hassan, a Democrat, has taken some positions that put her at odds with her own party and President Obama.

NHPR Staff

After months of walking a tightrope when it comes to her position on Donald Trump, New Hampshire Republican Senator Kelly Ayotte now says she can’t support her party’s presidential nominee.

This comes after the release of an 11-year-old video in which Trump bragged about using his position of power to sexually assault women.

2016 Presidential Race: Uncharted Territory

Oct 10, 2016
Josh Rogers NHPR

We take a moment, fewer than 30 days from the election, to evaluate the recent turn of events in the Presidential race.  An 11-year old video, in which Republican nominee Donald Trump talked crudely about groping women, prompts N.H.'s Senator Kelly Ayotte to join a growing wave of Republican lawmakers unwilling to vote for the Republican nominee, or even calling for him to step down. We review the second presidential debate featuring questions from undecided voters as well as the two moderators.  And we consider whether the Republican party can hang on to control in Congress, and how the GOP, seemingly in crisis, can rebound.


Republican Donald Trump and Democrat Hillary Clinton face off in the second presidential debate Sunday night at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri.

NPR's politics team, with help from reporters and editors who cover national security, immigration, business, foreign policy and more, is live annotating the debate. Portions of the debate with added analysis are highlighted, followed by context and fact check from NPR reporters and editors. 

Sara Plourde for NHPR

Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders was back in New Hampshire today. The former Democratic presidential candidate was campaigning for his former rival Hillary Clinton.

He was also here to support New Hampshire Gov. Maggie Hassan's bid for U.S. Senate. Sanders spoke with NHPR's Peter Biello.

  

josh rogers/nhpr

 

Town hall political events are dear to New Hampshire but not to Donald Trump, who built his campaign on huge rallies. And there were early signs Thursday night that Trump’s event in Sandown never aspired to be a true town hall.  

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

This story has been updated with a response from the Trump campaign.

At his rally in Bedford last week, Donald Trump’s prescription for New Hampshire’s drug crisis — a wall at the southern border as a way to stop the flow of drugs into the country — earned plenty of cheers.

That proposal, and his assessment of the state’s drug issues more generally, went over less well with New Hampshire’s leading drug prevention advocacy organization, New Futures.

Save the Children Action Network

    

Early-learning programs have always been a tough sell in New Hampshire. Child advocates and educators have tried for years to break lawmakers’ resistance to the idea, yet a proposal to put more 5-year-olds in all-day kindergarten can still roil Concord for months.

A Washington, D.C. political group with deep pockets, a team of lobbyists and a small army of volunteers wants to change that.

thisweekinraymond.com

Never one to shy away from weighing in on politics, Manchester Police Chief Nick Willard made his feelings clear in the race for governor this week, backing Democrat Colin Van Ostern.

"As I've gotten to know Colin, I've been impressed by his concern for every community in this state," Willard wrote in post on his personal Facebook page. "He met with me well over a year ago to wrap his head around what we have been experiencing as a community with the drug crisis and he did so long before it became politically expedient."

Sean Hurley

An outhouse by the side of the road has created a little stir in Ashland.  It’s not the outhouses’ proximity to a farm stand – or that through its open door you can see two toilet seats side by side.  As NHPR’s Sean Hurley tells us, it’s what the outhouse is being used for that’s causing all the commotion.

We’re winding along the pumpkins and the freshly picked produce, Chris Owens and I, at his farm stand on Route 175 in Ashland.  I’m not here to buy corn or lettuce.  I’m here to find out about Owens brand new...amenity.

New Hampshire Republican Senator Kelly Ayotte released a new ad Wednesday in which she continues to try and distance herself from comments she made Monday about Donald Trump being a role model for children.

"Let's be honest: both Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton are far from perfect, and I'm not perfect, either," Ayotte says as she strolls along the campus of Saint Anselm College, speaking directly to the camera. 

She then goes on to tout her bipartisan credentials in the ad.

Both Chris Sununu and Colin Van Ostern say their business experience makes them qualified to lead New Hampshire. But it was clear from the start of last night's NECN/Concord Monitor debate at New England College, that neither is much impressed by the other’s resume. 

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