Arts & Culture

• Check out our list of New Hampshire museums, galleries, performance venues & independent bookstores, sorted by region.

• You can also find art exhibits, book readings, live music and more on our Public Events Calendar.

"Birds of America," by John James Audubon / Wikipedia

Although it is only, technically, the middle of the month, Thanksgiving is quickly bearing down upon us.  If you have been too caught up in the news to make a grocery list or crack a cookbook, here are some ways to get your head in the game this weekend.

Sara Plourde / NHPR

A National Book Award winner, Pulitzer-Prize nominee, Guggenheim fellow, and winner of a MacArthur "genius" grant, Colson Whitehead's new book, The Underground Railroad, was one of the most anticipated works of fiction this year.

Virginia caught up with him backstage at the Capitol Center for the Arts in Concord, New Hampshire before a reading with novelist Ben Winters hosted of Gibson’s Bookstore.

Todd Bookman/NHPR

This year marks the 400th anniversary of the death of Shakespeare. Theater groups around the world are honoring the Bard’s work with traditional and updated stagings of his plays.

That includes a new performance of "Macbeth" at Sanborn Regional High School in Kingston. There, students are re-imagining the centuries-old tragedy, setting the work in the one of today’s most pressing humanitarian disasters — Syria.

11.14.16: Nonstop Metropolis & Words on the Move

Nov 14, 2016
http://giphy.com/gifs/timelapse-new-york-city-manhattan-SuG8hEiyKDCDe

Whether it's the overuse of like, saying "nuculear", or using the word "literally", figuratively, misuse of language has a way of getting under our skin. A linguist assures us that language is always changing...so loosen up. Today, why dictionaries and grammar sticklers can't stop improper language.

Plus artists, researchers and cartographers re-interpret the city that never sleeps... Illustrating its distinctive culture, history and variety through maps.

In Conversation With Colson Whitehead & Ben Winters

Nov 4, 2016
Courtesy Sara Plourde, NHPR

Colson Whitehead and Ben Winters joined Virginia in front of a live audience for the "In the Spotlight" series at the Capital Center for the Arts in Concord, New Hampshire, presented in partnership with Gibson's Bookstore. Today, we're listening to that conversation with two writers who made the imaginative leap from what we already know happened, to what could have happened.

UNH Art Department

Climate change is by and large an issue discussed by scientists, but a current show at 3S Artspace in Portsmouth is devoted to the topic. 

“Rise: Climate Change in Our World” is an exhibition featuring work by current students, alumni, technical staff and faculty from UNH.  The UNH art department collaborated with NextGen Climate NH, an environmental advocacy organization and 3S Artspace. 

David J. Murray, cleareyephoto.com

It’s our 30th episode, this time with the phenomenally successful Jodi Picoult.

Dave Herholz via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/311W1T

Flagrantly unsubstantiated "facts", misrepresented news, and deliberately false memes whooped up by the partisan fringes have been fast and furious this election... And thanks to Facebook's algorithm, fake news stories continue to trend. Today, if you yell at the Facebook echo chamber to stop, does it only get louder?

Then, in a contentious election season full of bombshells, boasts, and social media driving the outrage, how do newsrooms determine what deserves attention what doesn’t?

Ingvild Hunsrød via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/pQnNv3

As one of the most densely populated placed on earth, Hong Kong has a very competitive retail market. But deals can be had, if... You're willing to put up with a few ghosts. Today, the haunted house hustle.

Also today, it's been almost 70 years since Shirley Jackson's chilling classic "The Lottery" shocked readers. We'll talk with Jackson's grandson about his graphic adaptation of the story, and with Jackson's biographer about the author's many faces... Comically besieged housewife, channeler of nightmares, witch?

BBC Arts, November 6, 2015

Although you would be hard-pressed to find a palm tree or a kalua pig roast in New Hampshire, there are a plethora of ukulele opportunities in the Granite State.  The uke is a four-string member of the lute family, and originated in Hawaii in the 19th century, an adaptation of the Portuguese machete.  According to Hawaiian lore, the name means "the gift that came here”, from the Hawaiian words uku (gift or reward) and lele (to come).

Holly McCabe

For a small state, New Hampshire has a plethora of private schools, each with a rich academic and cultural heritage.  Although the schools are private, many have art galleries that are open to the public.  Student and faculty art shows are on regular offer, but there is also compelling and unique work from both national and international artists.

Androscoggin Valley Chamber of Commerce

All around New Hampshire the leaves are glowing red, yellow and orange, but in Berlin on Saturday, October 15th, the Androscoggin River will be aflame.  Literally.

The annual RiverFire event, based at Heritage Park on Main Street, will bring a full day of activities to “the city that trees built.” 

cowhampshireblog.com

A long weekend calls for a road trip, and rumor has it the foliage in the western part of the state is glowing. 

Miranda July The First Bad Man
Amor Towles Rules of Civility
Andre Dubus III Townie

Library of Congress / Rare Book & Special Collection Division

With frost on the ground your thoughts may be running to the other Frost, the poet whom we claim as a “resident,” although he was actually born in San Francisco and grew up in Massachusetts. 

There are two former Frost homes in New Hampshire—one in Derry and one in Franconia.  The Robert Frost Farm is a National Historic Landmark, and a remnant of New Hampshire’s agricultural past in now-suburban Derry. 

Feel like singing a forebitter?  Portsmouth is hosting its 17th Annual Folk Festival on Friday, Saturday and Sunday, September 23rd through 25th. 

Ric Kallaher Photography

The novelist, short story writer and essayist Cynthia Ozick's best known piece of writing is called The Shawl, a brutal, phantasmal story of a woman and two children marching to a Nazi concentration camp. The Holocaust and Jewish identity are recurring topics in Ozick's fiction and criticism. Growing up in the Bronx, she was called Christ-killer, and humiliated for not singing Christmas carols at school.

USFWS Mountain-Prairie via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/EJSXqM

Each year, eight-hundred thousand Latinos turn 18 in the United States - add up the 4 years since the last election, and you've got a whole lot of young voters. Today, a new app designed to increase turnout among young Latinos - an crucial block that haven't always shown up to the polls. 

Plus, the author of The Way Things Work - a quintessential coffee-table book from 1988 made up of detailed illustrations to explain everything from catapults to calculators. The classic book just got an update for the digital age.

And conservation by drone - we'll hear about a program designed to save black-footed ferrets from the plague by air-dropping vaccines.

The Hood Museum of Art at Dartmouth College is opening a new gallery space on Main Street in Hanover on September 16th.  The museum itself is closed until 2019 while it undergoes a major expansion project, but Director John Stomberg and his staff came up with a way to keep the Hood engaged in the community. 

(R) Colson Whitehead/ Photo Credit Madeleine Whitehead, (R) Ben Winters/ Photo Credit Nicola Goode

 

New Hampshire Public Radio in partnership with Gibson's Bookstore and Capitol Center for the Arts, is pleased to present Colson Whitehead (The Underground Railroad) and Ben Winters (The Last Policeman) on stage in conversation at the Spotlight Cafe at Capitol Center for the Arts.

Trigger Warnings, Born In Between, & Miranda July

Sep 9, 2016
Thomas Hawk via Flickr CC / flic.kr/p/dSuxV1

Demanding trigger warnings? Canceling speakers? Shutting down comedians? College students today make the political correctness of the past seem tame. Today, is oversensitivity ruining education? We’ll also look at the roots of extreme protectiveness in a nation where police officers are stationed at more and more high schools…a story about what happens when school discipline meets law enforcement. And while the trans-gender movement gains ground, we’ll explore the shockingly common occurrence of doctors assigning gender to intersex babies. 

Plan to head north this weekend? Take a side trip to Plymouth and check out the current exhibit at the Museum of the White Mountains at Plymouth State University. 

Karen Kenney

Andre Dubus III's memoir Townie told the story of his violent childhood on the wrong side of the tracks. Writing was his way out, and he's made more than good, with multiple NYT bestsellers, an Oprah’s Book Club pick, and an Oscar-nominated film adaptation (for his novel The House of Sand and Fog). And he gets out there, as a public speaker and writing instructor for graduate programs, seminars and retreats. We caught up with him at New Hampshire Writers’ Project's annual Writers’ Day.

Judy Blume - In the Unlikely Event
Daniel Silva - The Black Widow
Chuck Klosterman - But What If We're Wrong?

Fernando Stankuns via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/5tSdbv

Presidential candidates talk a lot about what they'll do to jump start the economy. But what about local TV stations that rely on campaign ads to pay the bills? They're hurting. Today on the show, it may feel like all campaign, all the time, but not on TV.

And, the Rio Olympics have ended - and green pool and Ryan Lochte-gate aside, it wasn't half the disaster people feared. But now with the Paralympics just around the corner, and only a fraction of tickets sold, disaster might just get another chance.

Tom Wigley via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/aWb3Uv

Poverty, suicide, and alcohol and drug abuse are disproportionately high among the two million Native Americans in the US - and at crisis levels on reservations. Today on the show, we'll look into one economic impediment: property rights.

And, women of the whites. A museum exhibit highlights how, from urban society, women took the lead in  developing access, accommodations and preservation of the paths and peaks of New Hampshire's White Mountains.

Amina Tagemouati via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/rbxKAD

Today on the show, a writer explores the greatest escape plan: pseudocide... We'll hear about the global disappearance industry that plots, facilitates and forges documents for fake deaths - and the investigators who track them down.

And from Team Refugee to Superfan Mavis, a rundown of Olympic tweets, memes, and illegal gifs... Including a very photogenic Tongan flagbearer.

Rich Fleischman

Essayist, novelist, columnist, sportswriter and former ethicist for the New York Times Magazine, Chuck Klosterman has got a wildly original voice. That makes sense for a guy who's written about glam metal bands in North Dakota, or whether you should hire a detective to trail your spouse. He's author of several best-sellers including Sex, Drugs & Cocoa Puffs and most recently But What If We're Wrong?: Thinking About the Present As If It Were the Past.

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