Arts & Culture

• Check out our list of New Hampshire museums, galleries, performance venues & independent bookstores, sorted by region.

• Visit our NHPR Arts & Culture Facebook page to connect with us and share your arts events!

• You can also find art exhibits, book readings, live music and more on our Public Events Calendar.

Former Daily Show reporter John Oliver’s fake news show on HBO is bucking the odds: diving deep into stories that aren’t in the headlines, and climbing in the ratings. On today’s show, what happens when comedy meets investigative journalism ?

Then, A-list DJs appear to live in the top tier of fabulousness. Jet-setting to giant clubs and VIP parties. We’ll get the inside view from Juan MacLean, an international star living quietly in Dover, NH.

Gilmanton, New Hampshire was once the most famous – or, if you prefer, notorious - small town in America, thanks to the 1950 Grace Metalious novel Peyton Place.

10.12.14: The Wonderful World Of Books

Oct 10, 2014
MorBCN via flickr Creative Commons

Today’s show is all about the wonderful world of books, starting with the U.S. Senate Handbook, a 380 page document of sometimes confounding rules intended to keep Senate offices running smoothly. Then, we’ll speak to an antiquarian bookseller about the beauty and obsession of rare books. And actor and comedian Bob Odenkirk discusses his debut collection of writings, A Load of Hooey.

Listen to the full show and click Read more for individual segments.

Which New Books To Read This Fall

Oct 9, 2014

As cooler weather sets in, we’ll find out what’s new in books suited for coming days in front of the fireplace. There’s a history of Wonder Woman from New Yorker staff writer Jill Lepore, a memoir from actor and director Lena Dunham, and a new book examining the old debate over vaccinations. (digital post by Faith Meixell)

GUESTS:

Officials in Nashua are considering plans for a new downtown performance arts venue. Architectural drawings call for a multi-level theater one block from Main Street that seats 1,400 and includes a 500-car parking garage and space for a restaurant. 

The city held a public hearing on the proposal Tuesday.

Sarah Marchant, who directs Nashua’s community development division, says the project would cost around 22-point-five million dollars, but she says the city doesn’t intend to foot that entire bill.

Good Gig: Rare Books Dealer Ken Gloss

Oct 8, 2014

Good Gig is a series of conversations with individuals who have landed their dream job. 

We're kicking off the series with Ken Gloss, the proprietor of the Brattle Book Shop in Boston, one of the largest--and oldest--antiquarian bookshops in the country. He has also been an appraiser of rare books and manuscripts for The Antiques Roadshow since 1998.

Pimthida via flickr Creative Commons

From the Trojan war to the current war in Afghanistan, soldiers have been penning farewell letters for centuries. On today’s show, a look into the deeply private “death letter” tradition throughout history.

Then, we’ll kick off our new series, “Good Gig”, with a rare bookseller who found his dream job among the binders on a dusty shelf.

Listen to the full show and click Read more for individual segments.

Guldfisken / flickr, creative commons

  The Portsmouth Athenaeum’s annual book sale begins on Friday at the North Church Parish. “There’s a bumper crop this year,” says Tom Hardiman, the Athenaeum’s “keeper,” or Executive Director.

Matt Novak via flickr Creative Commons

In Stanley Kubrick’s film 2001 A Space Odyssey, future technologies take center stage in the form of Hal 9000, a sentient, yet sinister, computer aboard the spacecraft Discovery One. On today’s show, an instructor at the MIT Media Lab envisions a brighter future, in which the interaction between humans and technology will be useful, and even playful. 

Plus, a science writer plays nuclear tourist and visits the site of the Chernobyl disaster, where he finds some surprising imagery.

Listen to the full show and Read more for individual segments.

Sexting, sex bracelets, sex parties. The media would have you believe that 21st-century teenagers are out of control, but are they? Today’s show takes an objective look at teenage sexual behavior, and explores what’s driving the hype.

And from teenage sex to Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles – how a simple sketch made in Dover, New Hampshire became a multi-billion dollar franchise.

Listen to the full show and Read more for individual segments.

Getting together for dinner on a regular basis can be tough for any family, but it is especially hard for military families during deployments. On today’s show: how one mother of three dealt with her husband’s deployment, by asking guests to fill his empty seat once a week. Then, the artist M.C. Escher may be best known for his repeating patterns and mind-bending optical illusions, but a new exhibit at the Currier Museum of Art, touted as the most comprehensive retrospective of Escher’s work, is highlighting his lesser known illustrations.

Listen to the full show and Read more for individual segments.

myri_bonni via flickr Creative Commons

At her funeral on Sunday, fellow comedians applauded Joan Rivers for her sharp wit, biting humor, and irreverent routines. What really made Joan Rivers so funny? On today’s show, the director of the Humor Research Lab offers some theories into what makes us laugh. Plus, from walk sign buttons that don’t reflect reality to digital signs over-estimating wait times at amusement parks; we’ll consider why technology is sometimes designed to give us the illusion of control.

Listen to the full show and Read more for individual segments. 


sfcartoonartmuseum.tumblr.com

In 1984, the heroes in a half shell -Turtle Power!- burst onto the comic scene, and the sewers would never be the same.

Peter Kirkeskov Rasmussen via flickr Creative Commons

It’s September, put down that beach novel, it's time to get serious about your to-be-read list. Thankfully, fall is the biggest season in the publishing world, so there's plenty of titles to choose from. Michele Filgate, freelance writer, critic, and independent bookseller at Community Bookstore in Brooklyn brings us her must read list for early fall. Click on the book titles for more information.

The Monadnock Folklore Society is the steward of New Hampshire’s musical and dance heritage. Samuel Foucher, who is 17, received a scholarship from the Society to study with legendary contra dance piano and accordion player Bob McQuillen. McQuillen, who died in February, 2014 at the age of 90.

 

Emilia Ornellas is a student teacher at the New Hampshire Institute of Art. She works with middle and high school students in the Student Enrichment Program in the Arts, also known as SEPIA. She explains that the program offers art classes Manchester students grades K-12.

Dhahiro Osman is an outgoing student who participated in the SEPIA program. Her interest? Self-improvement. “I thought that I’d give it a try, because I’m not a good artist; I thought this might be my chance to be good at it.”

Children's Museum of NH

Hippo Editor Amy Diaz is back for a look at New Hampshire events this weekend; It's Fest-A-Palooza Two, the Sequel!

For foodies, there's  Greekfest in Manchester, Fire on the Mountain Henniker Rotary Chili Fest, and the Jakarta Fair in Somersworth.

Michael May via flickr Creative Commons, amazon.com, Rui Costa via flickr Creative Commons and via sistersparrow.com

In 1936 18-year-old Marty Glickman was one of the fastest sprinters in the country, earning him a spot on the U.S. Olympic team and a trip to the Berlin Games. Today on Word of Mouth, we have the story of how he was removed from the competition to appease Hitler and how he then became a legendary sports broadcaster. Then lessons in science with The Art of Tinkering and a conversation about how elements were named.
Finally, Producer Zach Nugent spoke with front-woman Arleigh Kincheloe of the band Sister Sparrow and the Dirty Birds. Their new album is called Fight.

Listen to the whole show and click Read more for individual segments.

This show originally aired on 3.27.14. 

8.14.14: All About Language

Aug 14, 2014
Taylor Quimby

Prove it, learned behavior, survival of the fittest, organic produce… scientific terminology is part of our common language, but are we using the terms correctly? Today is all about language: starting with our frequent misuse of scientific terms. Plus, France’s government is banning English words like ‘fast-food’ and ‘hashtag’ in the name of cultural preservation…we find out why the words are unlikely to disappear from the vernacular anytime soon. And, deaf Americans who work in science have a unique challenge – helping to develop a scientific vocabulary for sign language.

Listen to the full show and Read more for individual segments.

Reflecting On Robin Williams

Aug 12, 2014
BagoGames via Flickr CC

 In April 2010, WTF host Marc Maron sat down to speak with Robin Williams. Following the news of Williams’ death on August 11, Maron reflected back on that interview and shared some of his thoughts on a conversation that he considers life-changing. The interview is at times delicate, as Williams talks about his battle with addiction and depression, but it also raised a new perspective the comedian which people had rarely seen before.

USGS Bee Inventory and Monitoring Lab via Flickr

Today on Word of Mouth, invasive species like Zebra Mussels to Asian Carp, are destroying biodiversity across North America. Or are they? Also, we'll look into China’s push to build a frozen food infrastructure. The number of urban Chinese households with a refrigerator has risen from just 7 percent to 95 percent in a decade. We’ll find out what that means for global climate change.

Listen to the full show and Read more for individual segments.


Internet Archive Book Images via flickr Creative Commons

In the last decade, cosmetic procedures performed on Asian-Americans, Hispanics and African-Americans have far outpaced those among the white population. The goal? Westernizing ethnic features.  Today we put ethnic plastic surgery on the examination table. Then, scientists are demystifying what may be the least understood human organ: the placenta. Plus, we share some personal stories from the delivery room.

Listen to the full show and Read more for individual segments.

Sara Plourde

Every month producer Zach Nugent picks a fresh bushel of new music for The Audio Orchard Playlist. Check it out below.

For the past few years Ben H. Winters has been writing detective novels set at the end of the world. His protagonist is Henry Palace, a member of the police force in Concord, NH, a man who is working to solve mysteries while a massive asteroid known as Maya heads toward Earth. As Maya’s impact grows closer society breaks further and further down, and still, Palace carries on. The third novel in this series has just been released, and it’s called World of Trouble. I spoke with Mr. Winters last week about his third and final book.

Glen David Andrews' "Redemption"

Jul 29, 2014
Derek Bridges via Flickr CC

We spoke with Glen David Andrews about his new album Redemption, which features his band and select friends who played major roles in a spiritual recovery that started him on a new path in life. The New Orleans musician came out with the new album after reconnecting with music, and its healing powers, in rehab. Many listeners have observed the similarities between Andrews and New Orleans itself, and in the album it’s hard to distinguish where the influences of one ends and the other begins.

edbrambley via Flickr CC

Studying medicine requires intelligence, discipline and considerable expense, making it one of the most prestigious professions in America. But that wasn’t always the case.  We take a look into the shady practices that lead the people of New York City to riot against doctors in the eighteenth-century. Then, for many people vacation is all about fun, sun, and relaxation…for others it’s about Kevlar vests and the front lines. We’ll take a look at the latest in adventure travel: war tourism. Plus, we speak with New Orleans musician Glen David Andrews about his newest album.

Listen to the full show and Read more for individual segments.


siftnz via Flickr CC

Has the digital age made things like handwritten letters and rotary phones obsolete? Today, we look at our possible transition towards a paperless society. Then, what treasure lays buried at your local transfer station? And how can that change your relationship with your neighbors? Plus, we speak with New Hampshire author Betsy Woodman about her new novel Emeralds Included.  

Listen to the full show and Read more for individual segments.


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