Arts & Culture

• Check out our list of New Hampshire museums, galleries, performance venues & independent bookstores, sorted by region.

• You can also find art exhibits, book readings, live music and more on our Public Events Calendar.

(Photo by The American Libary Association via Flickr/Creative Commons)

Elizabeth Gilbert reads from her new book, Committed: A Skeptic Makes Piece with Marriage, and talks about her relationship, skipping yoga in the mornings, and why Pamela Anderson is a great philosopher.

(Photo courtesy

A reflection on reactions to the pop singer's death this past weekend. 

This segment was produced by Shannon Dooling.

The controversial author and self-proclaimed inventor of a new genre of literary non-fiction, Ben Mezrich's bestselling books include Bringing Down the House and The Accidental Billionaires. The first was the source for the film, 21 and the second was adapted into the Academy Award-winning movie The Social Network.

This month’s installment of our 11 for '11 series of big picture conversations on the issues of our times. Today, we talk with psychologist, author and blogger Bruce Levine, a radical progressive calling for the resurgence of an active and energized democracy. Polls show that politicians are out of step with the will of the citizens on issues like the wall street bailout, health care reform and the current deadlock over raising the debt ceiling.

David J. Murray,

David McCullough is widely known for his Pulitzer Prize-winning writing on great leaders and American politics, in books such as Truman and John Adams. In his newest work he turns his focus to Americans abroad in Nineteenth Century Paris.

In this edition of Writers on a New England Stage, McCullough reads from his newest book, The Greater Journey: Americans in Paris, a chronicle spanning generation, and sits down for a conversation about his work, his influences, and America's age-old fascination with The City of Light.

David J. Murray,

Neil Gaiman is often credited for expanding the audience for comics beyond white, teenage boys with his Sandman series. But he is also a true multi-media phenom, a filmmaker, (now) recording artist, screenwriter for the likes of Dr. Who, and prolific author, including the multi-award winning, groundbreaking novel American Gods.

A new book by George Mason University Economics Chair Tyler Cowen has inspired spirited debate among beltway and economics circles. Published only as an e-book, The Great Stagnation: How America Ate All the Low-Hanging Fruit of Modern History, Got Sick, and Will (Eventually) Feel Better argues that America's economic growth plateaued in the 1970s. Median wages have stagnated since, he says, because we have eaten all the low hanging fruit that enabled innovation to flourish and average income to grow across the board.

In January, the global food price index rose for the seventh month in a row, reaching the higest level since record keeping began in 1990. Raj Patel is an activist and academic whose book, Stuffed and Starved, predicted the food crisis that caused riots on four continents back in 2008. More recently, his book, The Value of Nothing, argues that we as citizens should rethink our assumptions about rational markets and the very meaning of democracy.

How has technology changed the ways that we interact with one another? Sherry Turkle's Alone Together: Why We Expect More from Technology and Less from Each Other is the third in a trilogy exploring this question. Social networking, e-mail and texting, Turkle says, provide the façade of socialization but ultimately leave their users dissatisfied and disconnected. It may be time to reflect and reconsider the role we really want technology to play in our lives.


Confectionary Architects

Feb 14, 2008
Cheryl Senter

For those of you who like a little dessert after dinner, a trip to Canterbury Shaker Village might be in order this weekend.

Everyone has Rhythm

Dec 6, 2006

Since everyone with a beating heart already "has rhythm!” anyone can drum. That could well be the motto of the drum-jam, held the first Friday of the month at the Unitarian Universalist Church in Concord.

This past Friday evening, 16 people showed up... of all ages.

Wanna Sing "The Messiah"?

Dec 6, 2006
Ell Brown

It's hard to imagine Christmas without a choir singing Handel's Messiah.

In recent years a new tradition has developed: the 'Messiah-sing.'

It operates like a pick-up basketball game. Anyone who wants to sing the Messiah shows up at a concert hall with music in-hand. Tenors sit with tenors and sopranos with sopranos. And then -- without rehearsal -- the concert begins.

New Hampshire Public Radio correspondent Doug MacPherson attended one-such Messiah-sing at the Music Hall in Portsmouth.

He filed this audio postcard.

Tupelo Music Hall A Forum For Talent

Nov 19, 2005

The NHSO Conductor Search Continues

Apr 9, 2001