Arts & Culture

• Check out our list of New Hampshire museums, galleries, performance venues & independent bookstores, sorted by region.

• You can also find art exhibits, book readings, live music and more on our Public Events Calendar.

(Photo by Pedro Netto via Flickr Creative Commons)

Today marks the 31st anniversary of the day that John Lennon was shot and killed on the sidewalk in front of his home in New York City. Reams of words have been written about that senseless, irrevocable act. But writer and critic Tim Riley prefers the parts of John Lennon’s story that are not so well known. 

Imagining the Real John Lennon

Dec 8, 2011
Loco Steve via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/AUb58E

Today marks the 31st anniversary of the day that John Lennon was shot and killed on the sidewalk in front of his home in New York City. Reams of words have been written about that senseless, irrevocable act. But writer and critic Tim Riley prefers the parts of John Lennon’s story that are not so well known, as he details in his book, Lennon: The Man, the Myth, the Music - The Definitive Life.

Photo by: Paper Girl

 

A story to restore your faith in music superstars this holiday season. Elvis Costello is rallying his fans to save money by *not* buying a shiny new gift box set of his music called “the return of the spectacular spinning songbook”. The title comes from a trademark of Costello’s live shows with his band, the Attractions…he invites audience members to get to go up on stage and spin a massive, game-show style wheel of song titles from his back-catalog…whatever comes up, Elvis & the Attractions play.

praveenspravi

 

Flikr Creative Commons / drocpsu

The push to support local businesses – Buy Local campaigns – are gaining steam, and Invest-Local is no exception.

In Portsmouth, so called “Locavestors” have come together to save a community book store.

RiverRun bookstore sits near the center of downtown Portsmouth.

It’s a bright shop, with big windows looking out onto historic Congress Street.

Customers Nancy Pollard and Elria Ewing are in browsing for replicas of old maps of downtown.

They love their local bookseller.

Naturally Curious

Dec 2, 2011
<a href="http://naturallycuriouswithmaryholland.wordpress.com/category/december/">Mary Holland</a>

The natural world quiets down in December, both visually and audibly. Fall's riot of colors is long gone, and the bird song chorus is a distant memory. Not everyone embraces winter, but there is a positive way to view the impending season of cold, ice and snow. Without the overload of spring, summer and fall distractions, we're freed up to notice and appreciate the subtle winter world.

(Photo by <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/arwing3/3991116008/" target="_blank">That One Doood</a> via Flickr Creative Commons)

At the dawn of the MP3 era, music-lovers digitized their CD collections, racking up thousands of hours of songs on their home computers, while clearing out their shelves. The thrill was soon followed by the realization that most of us owned far more music than we had time to listen to.

One Nation Under AARP

Nov 30, 2011

What began a half century ago as an organization for insurance purposes has grown into much more.  The AARP has become an influential lobbying group with forty million members.   We’ll talk with the author of a new book which examines this and the AARP’s role in current debates over Medicare and Social Security.  

  • Frederick Lynch - An Associate Professor of  Government at Claremont McKenna College, and author of Invisible Victims and the Diversity Machine

 

(Photo courtesy <a href="www.mattpolly.com" target="_blank">Matt Polly</a>)

Who doesn’t love an underdog? A Rocky in the ring? With the audience for boxing eroding, the new ring is an octagonal cage. In popularity and profits, mixed martial arts, or MMA, has knocked out boxing in the past decade.  The Ultimate Fighting Championship, MMA’s flagship event, was sold for two million dollars in 2001. Today, it’s worth an estimated one billion. Our guest today is a definitive UFC underdog.  He’s a writer who dove George Plimpton-style into the grueling world of MMA and landed in the octagon. 

Author Stephen King has written more than 50 worldwide best-sellers. More than 80 feature and television film adaptations have extended King’s reach far beyond the bestsellers list, earning him the title of “Master of Horror,” and establishing him as one of the most influential writers of our age.

Alison Young is joined by Cantus, one of America's best all-male ensembles, for singing and storytelling about gratitude and what it is to be thankful. Listener information is available at http://americanpublicmedia.publicradio.org/programs/cantus_thxgiving/

 

 

 

 

 

 

Song/Artist/Album/Label

Like A Blessing/Tim Grimm/The Back Fields/Wind River

Over the River and Through the Wood/Julia Lane, Fred Gosbee and Barbara Burt/Going Home: Thanksgiving Music for Celtic Harp/Julia Lane

The Day Before Thanksgiving/Darrell Scott/A Crooked Road/Full Lights

The Thanksgiving Song/Fred Holstein/  Tribute To Steve Goodman/Red Pajamas

Thanks A Lot/Gravity/Roadman/Gravity

All God's Critters/John McCutcheon/Howjadoo/ Rounder

Photo by Piet den Blanken, courtesy of Oxford University Press

Why would a gun-wielding, tattoo-bearing "homie" trade in la vida loca for a Bible and the buttoned-down lifestyle of an evangelical hermano (brother in Christ)? To answer this question, Robert Brenneman interviewed sixty-three former gang members from the "Northern Triangle" of Central America--Guatemala, El Salvador, and Honduras--most of whom left their gang for evangelicalism.

(Photo by <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/roemerman/444304025/">Steven Roerman </a>via Flickr Creative Commons)

Jay Wexler's new book and blog focus on the odd Constitutional clauses we should, maybe, focus on a little less...and those we should, perhaps, turn into awesome t-shirts.

Kate interviews The Christmas Revels.

The Revels North Chorus will be performing their Christmas show at the Hopkins Center at Dartmouth College from December 15 - 18.

See video of Punk's Delight's instruments here.

Art Based Literacy Reaches out to NH Refugee Students

Nov 16, 2011

In 2009 Beth Olshansky, a pioneer in a theory of education called "art based literacy" brought her ideas to Webster Elementary school in Manchester.  Olshansky worked with the school's large immigrant and refugee population, many of whom hardly spoke English, by having them illustrate then write a book on the stories of their lives. It was successful. The following year, Moharimet Elementary School in Madbury caught wind of the project and decided to bring a new group of Webster students over there to have them write their stories together.

Tupelo Music Hall

Kate hosts Catie Curtis at the Tupelo Music Hall in White River Junction, Vermont.

Erik Eisele / NHPR

As of early 2010, more than 2 million US troops have served in Iraq and Afghanistan. Larry Minear, a researcher on international and internal armed conflicts, has spent a lot of time talking to more than 175 of these veterans, many of whom came from New Hampshire and Vermont. He talked to them about what motivated them to go to war, what they did once they went over, and how they rejoined society upon their return.

Is time real, or is change just a kind of optical illusion resting on a deeper unchanging reality?

As finite creatures, with death hovering just out of our sight, the true nature of time haunts all our endeavors. Tomorrow, physicist Brian Greene tackles time's illusion in his Fabric of Reality PBS series. Science, however, is just one way we ask about the reality of time.

Flickr Creative Commons

Song/ Artist/ Album/ Label
 

Ben McLeod / Flickr Creative Commons

A group of teachers from St. Paul's in Concord trades hall-passes for instruments after school.  Two members join us to talk about the art of finely-aged Rock N'Roll.

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The Fletchtones might be a group made up of prep school faculty and staff, but that doesn't mean they don't rock hard. 

 

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Zimpenfish / Flickr Creative Commons

Amazon is back in the business of getting books on print - only now, they're hopping the middle man. Jason Boog, Editor of the publishing website Galley Cat, explains.

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Karl-Ludwig Poggeman / Flickr Creative Commons

Editor for Scientific American Michael Moyer explains how genetically-modified mosquitoes could stop the spread of Dengue Fever; unless uncomfortable corporate practices don't cause a GMO backlash first.

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Kaveh Khodjasteh / Flickr Creative Commons

Deaf Israeli slam-poet Aneta Brodski collaborates with Palestinian interpreter Veronica Staehle, uniting culture and language through art.

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Republic, Lost

Nov 1, 2011

"Why have fundamentally good people, with good intentions, allowed our democracy to be co-opted by outside interests?", asks Harvard professor, Lawrence Lessig. His new book "Republic, Lost" explores how he says money has corrupted American politics.  Lessig blames special interests and campaign finance rules to the fact that U.S citizens trust government less than ever. He also  suggests  a widespread mobilization and new Constitution Convention to regain control over what he says is a 'corrupted but redeemable representational system. 

Guest

Rick Broussard, Editor of Volume 2 in the New Hampshire Pulp Fiction Series, explains why New Hampshire is such a good background for a mystery anthology.

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