Arts & Culture

• Check out our list of New Hampshire museums, galleries, performance venues & independent bookstores, sorted by region.

• Visit our NHPR Arts & Culture Facebook page to connect with us and share your arts events!

• You can also find art exhibits, book readings, live music and more on our Public Events Calendar.

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NH News
8:46 am
Fri October 28, 2011

Crime Fiction the Granite State Way

Rick Broussard, Editor of Volume 2 in the New Hampshire Pulp Fiction Series, explains why New Hampshire is such a good background for a mystery anthology.

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NH News
5:15 pm
Thu October 27, 2011

Daddy's Junky Music Closes

From Twitter:

DADDY'S JUNKY MUSIC CLOSING? that's where I got my first guitar

wishing to have given in to the recent compulsion to visit

after 39 years......I'm shocked!

Remember to tip your guitarist for delivering that pizza.

And so it went.

An iconic store of New England’s music scene has shut its doors.  Daddy’s Junky Music was forced by creditors to close its operations after 39 years. 

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Author Interviews
12:25 pm
Tue October 25, 2011

Jobs' Biography: Thoughts On Life, Death And Apple

Walter Isaacson's biography of Apple co-founder Steve Jobs was published Monday, less than three weeks after Job's death on Oct. 5.

Joe Raedle Getty Images

Originally published on Tue October 25, 2011 3:35 pm

When Steve Jobs was 6 years old, his young next door neighbor found out he was adopted. "That means your parents abandoned you and didn't want you," she told him.

Jobs ran into his home, where his adoptive parents reassured him that he was theirs and that they wanted him.

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NH News
5:59 pm
Mon October 24, 2011

Rock & Roll Photo Exhibit at the Currier

Last week, rock photographer Barry Feinstein died.

While the name might not ring a bell, he shot the cover of Bob Dylan's "The Times They Are A Changing" and Janis Joplin's "Pearl," and countless others.

His photographs, as well as works from other famous and not-so-famous rock photographers, are on display at the Currier Museum of Art in Manchester.

The exhibit captures some of Rock and Roll’s biggest icons.

The photos aren’t posed promo shots, but intimate off-stage photos rarely seen by the public.

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11 for '11
12:00 am
Tue October 4, 2011

11 for '11: Stephen Pinker

This month’s installment of our 11 for '11 series of big picture conversations on the issues of our times. Today, we talk with Harvard experimental psychologist Stephen Pinker about his new book, Better Angels of Our Nature, about the history of violence, and why it's declined

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Word of Mouth
11:01 am
Mon September 12, 2011

Outcasts United

In 2009, we spoke with new York Times reporter Warren St. John about his book Outcasts United– which tells the story of the Fugees soccer team and the growth of community around them.  The book is currently being featured in the Concord Reads program at the Concord Public Library.  Concord is a city that has experienced its own influx of refugees from war torn countries in recent years.  Here is what Warren had to say about the Fugees' inspiring story.

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You Must Read This
7:00 am
Thu September 1, 2011

Bold, Beautiful Violence In A Strange, Savage Town

[Spoiler alert: This review gives away some elements of the story.]

When a friend gave me Merce Rodoreda's Death in Spring, he told me it would blow my mind. Ten pages in, I doubted his claim.

The book begins when the narrator, a 14-year-old boy from a small mountain village, slips into a cold, sometimes savage river to escape a bee. His swim is interspersed with descriptions of his isolated community, with its pink painted homes and wisteria vines that "over the years, upwrenched houses."

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11 for '11
12:00 am
Tue August 16, 2011

11 for '11: Eliza Griswold

This month’s installment of our 11 for '11 series of big picture conversations on the issues of our times. Today, we talk with poet and journalist Eliza Griswold, about her book The Tenth Parallel: Dispatches from the Fault Line Between Christianity and Islam. Griswold spend seven years traveling the band of the globe called the 'tenth parallel,' the latitude about ten degrees above the equator where two worlds collide.

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Writers on a New England Stage -Elizabeth Gilbert
12:00 am
Sun July 31, 2011

Elizabeth Gilbert Grows Up

(Photo by The American Libary Association via Flickr/Creative Commons)

Elizabeth Gilbert reads from her new book, Committed: A Skeptic Makes Piece with Marriage, and talks about her relationship, skipping yoga in the mornings, and why Pamela Anderson is a great philosopher.

Word of Mouth
12:00 pm
Sat July 30, 2011

Amy Winehouse: Gone but never forgotten

(Photo courtesy RealBollywood.com)

A reflection on reactions to the pop singer's death this past weekend. 

Writers on a New England Stage
12:00 am
Tue July 26, 2011

Writers on a New England Stage: Ben Mezrich

This segment was produced by Shannon Dooling.

The controversial author and self-proclaimed inventor of a new genre of literary non-fiction, Ben Mezrich's bestselling books include Bringing Down the House and The Accidental Billionaires. The first was the source for the film, 21 and the second was adapted into the Academy Award-winning movie The Social Network.

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11 for '11
12:00 am
Tue July 19, 2011

11 for '11: Bruce Levine and Political Participation

This month’s installment of our 11 for '11 series of big picture conversations on the issues of our times. Today, we talk with psychologist, author and blogger Bruce Levine, a radical progressive calling for the resurgence of an active and energized democracy. Polls show that politicians are out of step with the will of the citizens on issues like the wall street bailout, health care reform and the current deadlock over raising the debt ceiling.

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Writers on a New England Stage
12:00 am
Tue July 5, 2011

Writers on a New England Stage: David McCullough

David McCullough reads from The Greater Journey
David J. Murray, cleareyephoto.com

David McCullough is widely known for his Pulitzer Prize-winning writing on great leaders and American politics, in books such as Truman and John Adams. In his newest work he turns his focus to Americans abroad in Nineteenth Century Paris.

In this edition of Writers on a New England Stage, McCullough reads from his newest book, The Greater Journey: Americans in Paris, a chronicle spanning generation, and sits down for a conversation about his work, his influences, and America's age-old fascination with The City of Light.

Writers on a New England Stage
12:00 am
Wed June 29, 2011

Writers on a New England Stage: Neil Gaiman

Neil Gaiman backstage at The Music Hall
David J. Murray, cleareyephoto.com

Neil Gaiman is often credited for expanding the audience for comics beyond white, teenage boys with his Sandman series. But he is also a true multi-media phenom, a filmmaker, (now) recording artist, screenwriter for the likes of Dr. Who, and prolific author, including the multi-award winning, groundbreaking novel American Gods.

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11 for '11
12:00 am
Tue March 22, 2011

11 for '11: Tyler Cowen

A new book by George Mason University Economics Chair Tyler Cowen has inspired spirited debate among beltway and economics circles. Published only as an e-book, The Great Stagnation: How America Ate All the Low-Hanging Fruit of Modern History, Got Sick, and Will (Eventually) Feel Better argues that America's economic growth plateaued in the 1970s. Median wages have stagnated since, he says, because we have eaten all the low hanging fruit that enabled innovation to flourish and average income to grow across the board.

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