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Something Wild
12:26 am
Fri January 10, 2014

NH Has Got Stones!

The Madison Boulder in Madison, NH is one of the largest known "glacial erratics" in North America.
Credit davidburn via Flickr/Creative Commons

Winter's transparent landscape offers a great opportunity for boulder appreciation. And New Hampshire has a lot of big ones, deposited by glacier action over 10,000 years ago. As the ice sheet advanced south, at it's glacial pace, it fractured and plucked many large boulders rights off mountain tops. When the glacier eventually receded, it left behind billions of these "glacial boulders." 

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The Exchange
9:00 am
Thu January 9, 2014

Energy Efficiency - How N.H. Stacks Up

Credit JasonWalton / Flickr Creative Commons

A recent report places New Hampshire in the middle of the pack nationally when it comes to programs and policies to conserve energy, and that we’re behind the other New England states. We’ll look at the costs, regulations and the possible outcomes down the road.

GUESTS:

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NH News
7:40 am
Thu January 9, 2014

Hudson Company To Pay EPA $116K For Plant Violations

A printing equipment company has agreed to pay $116,000 to the Environmental Protection Agency over air pollution violations at its plant in Hudson, N.H.

Last September, the EPA filed a complaint against Presstek alleging violations of hazardous waste management laws, including failure to comply with air emission regulations.

The EPA said as part of its operations manufacturing printing equipment, Presstek generates hazardous wastes that include solvent-containing wastes, which are ignitable, and corrosive wastes.

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Word of Mouth
2:04 pm
Mon January 6, 2014

Rethink 2014: Conservation

Credit Sara Plourde

We’re beginning this new year with “Re-think 2014”, conversations and stories that challenge our assumptions, habits and ways of doing things.

We’re kicking off “Re-think 2014” with Fred Pearce, environment consultant for New Scientist magazine.  His article, “How Beer Money Helped Save a Nation’s Water Supply” appeared in Conservation Magazine. It’s an example of a conglomerate upending the business-as-usual model of pursuing profits no matter the environmental and human costs. In this case – helping to protect an essential natural resource for its own manufacturing, and the people of Columbia.

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Environment
5:25 pm
Mon December 30, 2013

Push To Ramp Up Energy Efficiency Faces Hurdles Of Trust

Credit Ben McCleod via Flickr CC

When it comes to investing in energy efficiency, many in New Hampshire’s clean energy sector are worried the state is falling behind the rest of the region. A recent national report seems to bear that out. It ranks New Hampshire last in New England for efficiency policies. But efforts to ramp up the least controversial energy policy – using less – could have a hard time getting the support of the state’s business community.

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Something Wild
12:46 am
Fri December 27, 2013

State Fern Nominee?

  New Hampshire's a state insect, the ladybug was nominated by persuasive Concord fifth graders; the pumpkin is our state fruit courtesy of some persuasive Harrisville third and fourth graders. I'd like to plant a seed—or perhaps a spore—for nomination of rock polypody as our state fern. Here's the case.

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Environment
5:41 pm
Mon December 9, 2013

Hassan Signs On To Cross-Border Air Pollution Petition

The New England governors have asked that the EPA include nine additional states into a compact that works together - and is held to the same standards - on air quality issues.
Credit NHPR

On Monday Governor Hassan joined Democratic governors from seven other Northeastern states in asking the EPA to clamp down on emissions drifting over their borders from other states. The petition targets states upwind from the Northeast, which Governor Hassan says produce the vast majority of ozone-causing pollution in New Hampshire, wafts across our borders from the Midwest and Mid-Atlantic

“If we took every single car off our roadways, we still could only reduce ozone by three percent,” Hassan told reporters during a conference call.

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Word of Mouth
10:40 am
Mon December 9, 2013

The Not So Dirty Job Of Toilet Testing

Credit Sustainable Sanitation via Flickr Creative Commons

More than a third of the world’s population don’t have access to clean, safe toilets. It’s a humanitarian and global health hazard, that the world bank drains $260 billion off the global economy each year. The Gates Foundation challenged engineers to develop commodes that are clean, cheap, and don’t require electricity, a sewage system, or even water. But as with and new product, you have to test it. That’s where John Koeller comes in. He’s principal engineer at Maximum Performance, a company who tests toilet efficiency, using its own – ahem—patented material.

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Word of Mouth
10:21 am
Mon December 9, 2013

Invasion Of The Tumbleweeds

Skeletons of Russian thistle, better known as tumbleweed, pile up in a yard in Lancaster, California.
©Diane Cook and Len Jenshel/National Geographic

Tumbleweeds rolling? Must be a western. The cinematic signal of high plains desolation has an even more pernicious side: it’s an invasive species known as Russian Thistle, and it’s wreaking havoc across the United States. George Johnson is a writer based in Santa Fe, and a regular contributor to National Geographic, where he wrote about fighting the tumbleweed menace in his own backyard. To see more photos click here.

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All Things Considered
5:12 pm
Fri December 6, 2013

New Hampshire MTBE Testing, Cleanup Initiative Getting Underway

New Hampshire’s program to clean up MTBE contamination is getting underway.

The Executive Council has approved funding for an Remediation Bureau, which will begin testing wells and water sources for MTBE contamination. The gasoline additive was intended to help the state address air pollution, but it was banned in 2007, years after the state began seeking damages from companies that produced and marketed gasoline with MTBE because of its effects on groundwater.

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Environment
5:39 pm
Mon December 2, 2013

RGGI States To EPA: Let Us Regulate Power Plant Carbon

Credit Christian Patti / http://christianpatti.com/

The nine states that are members of the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative have written the EPA to ask that RGGI be used as a model for forthcoming national regulations on emissions from existing power plants.

The EPA has already released rules on how much carbon dioxide new power plants are allowed to emit, But the rules that will crack down on existing plants are still in the works.

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Foodstuffs
1:46 pm
Thu November 14, 2013

Could Drones Help Protect Apple Orchards From Disease?

UNH doctoral student Matt Wallhead (left) and assistant professor of plant pathology Kirk Broders, with their unmanned aerial vehicle.
Credit Rachel Rohr / Courtesy UNH

One of the challenges apple growers face is a fungal disease known as apple scab. New research at the University of New Hampshire might yield a better approach to preventing its spread – an approach, by the way, that includes the use of special imaging cameras mounted on unmanned aerial vehicles, also known as UAV’s or drones.
 

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Word of Mouth
2:02 pm
Wed November 13, 2013

Is The Global Carbon Footprint Shrinking?

A view of Typhoon Haiyan from space.
Credit Fragile Oasis via Flickr Creative Commons

The opening of the U.N.'s climate change summit this past weekend in Poland was overshadowed by Typhoon Haiyan. A Filipino envoy broke down in tears when describing the devastation, and received a standing ovation when he announced that he would fast until a "meaningful outcome is in sight."

An increase in weather-related disasters, fluctuating temperatures and rising sea levels are among the discouraging issues being discussed at the 2-week summit in Warsaw. But, there is some encouraging news…a new report by a Dutch agency found that global greenhouse gas emissions showed signs of slowing in 2012. The slackened pace is not attributed to recession, and has, in fact, occurred as wealth continues to climb among the world’s top CO2 emitters. Fred Pearce is environmental consultant for New Scientist, and breaks down the optimistic report for us. 

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