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EarthTalk
10:58 am
Mon August 13, 2012

What Can We Do to Reduce Our Light Footprint?

The federally funded National Optical Astronomy Observatory reports that poorly-aimed, unshielded outdoor lights waste 17.4 billion kilowatt-hours of electricity in the U.S. each year.
Brand X Pictures

EarthTalk®
E - The Environmental Magazine

Dear EarthTalk: Has anyone calculated the energy wasted at night by unnecessary lighting in and around buildings? What can we do to reduce our light footprint?       -- Bill Rehkamp, via e-mail

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Something Wild
12:00 am
Fri August 10, 2012

Not So Common Nighthawks

Photo Courtesy Lillian Stokes

In mid-August, one of the most elegant and least known migration flights begins. Common nighthawks, a long-distance migrant, are one of the earliest to depart their northern breeding grounds. Despite their species name, they aren't hawks and they aren't nocturnal. And, alas, they no longer are common. Nighthawks are crepuscular, a great word for the handful of species that are most active at dawn and dusk.

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EarthTalk
12:00 am
Sun August 5, 2012

Will Mt. St. Helens Become a National Park?

iStock Photo

EarthTalk®
E - The Environmental Magazine

Dear EarthTalk: What ever happened to the idea of turning Mt. St. Helens into a national park? -- Esther Monaghan, Boston, MA

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EarthTalk
12:00 am
Sun August 5, 2012

The Endangered Species Act -- Success or Failure?

U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

EarthTalk®
E - The Environmental Magazine

Dear EarthTalk: Do environmentalists think the Endangered Species Act has been a success or failure with regard to protecting biodiversity in the U.S.?-- Ron McKnight, Trenton, NJ

While that very question has been a subject of debate already for decades, most environmental advocates are thankful such legislation is in place and proud of their government for upholding such high standards when it comes to preserving rare species of plants and animals.

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The Exchange
9:00 am
Thu August 2, 2012

Mitigation or Adaption?

With a link between extreme weather and rising greenhouse gases, two thoughts are emerging. Many environmentalists say we should work toward mitigating greenhouse gases but others suggest the problems are irreversible and so we have to adapt to inevitable change. But for some this idea is uncomfortable. They worry that adaptation means giving up. Today we look at these two different thoughts around climate change and see where we go from here.

Guests

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Inspired Lives
7:00 am
Wed August 1, 2012

Inspired Lives: David Carroll

Turtle Nesting in Moonlight
David Carroll, courtesy of the artist

Naturalist-artist David M. Carroll is the author of three acclaimed natural histories.  Swampwalker's Journal, for which he received the John Burroughs medal for distinguished nature writing, The Year of the Turtle, and Trout Reflections. David graduated from the School of the Boston Museum of Fine Arts and Tufts University, and received an Honorary Doctorate of Humane Letters from the University of New Hampshire and an Honorary Masters in Environmental Science from New England College. In 2006 he was named a MacArthur Foundation Fellow.

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Word of Mouth
10:52 am
Tue July 31, 2012

Look, Don't Touch: The Problem With Environmental Education

Tiggywinkle via Flickr Creative Commons

If you want to learn about the earth, you’re gonna have to get your hands dirty.   That’s the philosophy of environmental educator David Sobel: senior faculty member at Antioch University New England, and author of the book "Beyond Ecophobia".

EarthTalk
12:00 am
Sun July 29, 2012

Why Are Some Countries Still Whaling?

Thjurexoell

EarthTalk®
E - The Environmental Magazine

Dear EarthTalk:Commercial whaling was banned around the world years ago, but some nations continue to hunt whales. Why is this and what’s being done about it? -- Jackie O’Neill, Hershey, PA

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EarthTalk
12:00 am
Sun July 29, 2012

Genetically Engineered … Mosquitoes?

USDA

EarthTalk®
E - The Environmental Magazine

Dear EarthTalk: I couldn’t believe my ears: “genetically engineered mosquitoes?” Why on Earth would they be created? And I understand there are plans to release them into the wild? -- Marissa Abingdon, Sumter, SC

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Something Wild
12:00 am
Fri July 27, 2012

The World Brought Close

Photo Courtesy jlcwalker via Flickr

A Something Wild listener recently asked for a recommendation for binoculars—preferably in the low- to medium-price range. It's a great subject. My favorite word heard on field trips is "Ohmygod," an exclamation involuntarily emitted when someone sees a bird or butterfly—or just about anything—up close through good binoculars.

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The Exchange
9:00 am
Mon July 23, 2012

The Future of Great Bay

Conservation Law Foundation

Often called New Hampshire’s “hidden coast, the Great Bay is considered an estuary of national significance. Yet, its future seems in question both because pollution has taken a toll on its ecosystem and because nearby communities, activists, and officials can’t agree on how best to eradicate it, even as all realize something must be done. We'll look at the Great Bay debate and see if some sort of compromise can be made?

Guests

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EarthTalk
12:00 am
Sun July 22, 2012

Are There Alternatives to Conventional, Energy-Hogging Air Conditioners?

Photos.com

EarthTalk®
E - The Environmental Magazine

Dear EarthTalk: Has an alternative to air conditioning to keep rooms cool been invented that is significantly cheaper and/or that uses significantly less energy than traditional air conditioning?--Ashutosh Saxena, Allahabad, India

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EarthTalk
12:00 am
Sun July 22, 2012

Air Pollution in National Parks

iStock Photo

EarthTalk®
E - The Environmental Magazine

Dear EarthTalk: I was appalled by the pollution haze I saw on a recent visit to Acadia National Park in Maine, and was told by a ranger that it was from smokestacks and tailpipes hundreds of miles away. Is anything being done to clear the air in Acadia and other natural areas where people go to breathe fresh air and enjoy distant unobstructed views?-- Betty Estason, via e-mail

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Something Wild
12:00 am
Fri July 20, 2012

Natural Design

We continue to evolve and learn from Nature itself. The Missoula Montana-based "Biomimicry Institute" promotes the study and integration of natural design principles and serves as a resource for students and researchers through workshops and curricula.

Bio-mimicry adapts natural systems which have evolved over 3.8 billion years of evolution to create more sustainable human technologies. Elegant and functional designs found in Nature have been used to create structures, complex machines, electronics and even transportation and communication networks.

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