Environment

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Environment
5:30 am
Tue September 17, 2013

Adding Climate Change Into The Conservation Equation

To ensure that more species survive, more variety of habitat has to be conserved, which some conservation groups fear won't happen without some coordination.
Credit Sam Evans-Brown / NHPR

When setting aside land for conservation, what are the priorities? Nice views? Old trees? Mossy stone walls? A pair of conservation groups think that maybe the biggest consideration should be how much the land will help different species survive climate change.

New Hampshire’s show-stoppers are its great granite peaks, and a lot of resources are going toward protecting them.

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NH News
3:31 pm
Mon September 16, 2013

N.H. Joins Lawsuit Aimed At Blocking Fishing Regulations

The Gulf Of Maine Cod is one of the species of fish affected by the federal groundfishing regulations.

New Hampshire is joining a lawsuit arguing that new federal rules will devastate New England's groundfishing industry.

Gov. Maggie Hassan and Attorney General Joseph Foster said Monday that New Hampshire has joined a lawsuit Massachusetts filed against fishing regulators in May seeking to block the rules.

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Word of Mouth
3:02 pm
Mon September 16, 2013

The Government Has Been Dropping Rabies Vaccines By Plane For Years

A couple weeks ago the Associated Press reported that the Department of Agriculture was dropping new vanilla-flavored rabies vaccines by airplane over New Hampshire forests as part of a five-state pilot study. Okay, if that sounds a little strange to you, get this: apparently the government has been distributing rabies vaccines by plane for over fifteen years. The story piqued the interest of NHPR environmental reporter Sam Evans-Brown, so he did some digging and is here to tell us more.

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NH News
8:31 am
Thu September 12, 2013

Virus May Be Responsible For Wild Turkey Deaths

Wild turkeys are a common sight in New Hampshire this time of year.
Credit pbedell via Flickr Creative Commons

New Hampshire Fish and Game biologists say wild turkeys in the Newington area may have been infected with a couple of viruses.

They've sent specimens from dead turkeys found last week to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Biologists tell the Portsmouth Herald the turkeys may be been infected with the avian pox virus or one referred to as LPDV.

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Environment
4:42 pm
Fri September 6, 2013

Investment Firms Still Lining Up To Buy RGGI Allowances

Sam Evans-Brown NHPR; Data: RGGI

Results have been posted from the latest auction of allowances for emitting a ton of carbon dioxide under the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative or RGGI. After rising in the first half of the year prices and demand have leveled off this quarter. The right to emit a ton of carbon sold for $2.67 this quarter.

That’s down nearly 17 percent from the last auction, but still substantially higher than the floor price where it had been trading for more than two years.

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Environment
1:21 pm
Wed August 21, 2013

Statewide Project Looks At Ecosystems And Climate Change

UNH aqua-sensor technician Lisle Synder inspects an electrical cord at the Saddleback Mtn. site in Deerfield, N.H.
Ella Nilsen NHPR

A collaborative project between New Hampshire universities, the National Science Foundation, and state agencies is looking at ecosystem health and how the environment is affected by climate change.

At first glance, this part of Saddleback Mountain in Deerfield looks like a regular forest. But look closer and you see thick, black electrical cords running along the forest floor and silver instruments sitting among the trees.

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Giving Matters
12:00 am
Sat August 17, 2013

The Fight For Frisky Hill

Credit Gilmanton Land Trust

On her commute from Laconia to Pittsfield six days a week, Tobi Gray Chassie often stops at scenic spot in Gilmanton called Frisky Hill. When Chassie saw a sign telling of plans to develop the land, she felt that it was her duty to support the Gilmanton Land Trust in their protection of the land which meant so much to her.

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Environment
5:43 pm
Mon August 5, 2013

Durham's Third Way: One Great Bay Community Blazing A New Trail To Clean Water?

Durham Town Engineer Dave Cedarholm shows off one of the rain gardens installed as alternative an storm water control in Durham.
Credit Sam Evans-Brown / NHPR

Several   seacoast communities have been ordered to upgrade their waste-water treatment plants by the EPA.But towns are pushing back on the question of how much the plants need to improve.

Durham is in that boat. The town is trying a new approach to pollution control called adaptive management. And depending on how things go for Durham, this could be the way the way towns and the EPA will resolve difficult and expensive water problems going forward.

The Nitrogen Numbers

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Word of Mouth
11:12 am
Mon August 5, 2013

Arctic Methane Belch Could Prove Costly

Credit NASA/Kathryn Hansen via NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's flickr

Methane is 25 times more potent a greenhouse gas than carbon – and scientists have discovered there is a potentially disastrous amount of methane trapped under relatively thin ice in the east Siberian arctic shelf. New research measures the global impact the gas could have on global warming… and it’s not very optimistic.  Fred Pearce is environmental consultant for New Scientist.

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Giving Matters
12:00 am
Sat August 3, 2013

Children Learn To Be Good Stewards Of The Great Bay

Great Bay Discovery Center in Greenland, N.H. April 8, 2013.
Cheryl Senter

The Great Bay Stewards work to preserve and protect the Great Bay estuary through education, land protection and research. Sharon Musselman, one of the educators, is recently a retired teacher who often brought her own classes here to explore this ecosystem.

"I'm excited to be here at Great Bay Discover center," Musselman said. "I brought my first grade class to Great Bay for 15 years because it is such a great experience for first graders."

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The Exchange
9:00 am
Wed July 31, 2013

Eradicating Invasive Species: Part 1 - Plants

Purple Loosestrife, Autumn Olive, Norway Maple and Multi-flora Rose may sound like plants you'd want in your garden, but actually, they're four of the 423 invasive plants currently in New Hampshire. These non-indigenous weeds, trees and shrubs, grow with a great ferocity strangling and starving the native species. Now some are fighting back against these green villains and making some progress as well. Today we begin a two part series on invasive species in New Hampshire, starting with weeds, trees and other non-native plants. 

Guests:

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Word of Mouth
10:49 am
Tue July 30, 2013

Breaching The Veazie Dam To Restore A Habitat

More than 300 excited spectators gathered to watch the breaching of Veazie Dam.
Credit Meagan Racey, USFWS via flickr

On July 22nd, bulldozers breached the Veazie dam in Eddington, Maine – an 830 foot strip of concrete that had separated the Atlantic Ocean and the Penobscot River for a century.  It was an effort undertaken by an unlikely coalition of conservationists, fishermen, power companies and others, who came together to help restore 1000 miles of endangered Atlantic salmon habitat. Brian Graber is director of the river restoration program at American rivers, one of the partners behind the project.

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The Exchange
9:00 am
Mon July 29, 2013

Concerns About N.H.'s Moose Population

Long before Bullwinkle, has the moose been an iconic favorite in the state. In fact, naturalists for years have referred to them as 'charismatic megafauna'.  But recently the numbers of these gentle giants have reduced, some blame disease, others climate change. Now the state is doling out nearly $700.00 to tag and study the antlered animal. Today we learn more about the moose and what's being done to bring its numbers back.

Guests:

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