Foodstuffs

A food blog from NHPR news, digital, & programming staff, exploring food & food culture around the state & the New England region. On-air features air Thursdays on All Things Considered and Saturdays during Weekend Edition.

Ryan Lessard / NHPR

The A&E Custom Coffee Roastery in Amherst is hosting a latte art throwdown. We decided to learn more about how latte art is made and judged.

Sam Delay really knows his coffee.

“This espresso that we’re using is our bonbon espresso blend.”

Delay is a trainer and wholesale account manager at A&E. And, as a barista, he puts a lot of pride in his art, describing the exact weight of the coffee grounds, the time it takes to pour, the volume of a double-shot and so on.

“Mugs that are very good for pouring art have a very curved bottom.”

Florian Schroiff via flickr Creative Commons / flic.kr/p/4LGNke

UPDATE: Thanks to everyone who submitted answers to our questionnaire. We'll leave it up in case some of you haven't had a chance to submit. Here's a link to the answers we've received so far: Questionnaire Results.

Overview of Results: These don't include the results of our panel.

Ketchup: Heinz or Hunts?

This is a time of year when food banks and aid groups are looking for ways to encourage people to donate food and money to help the hungry.

The Portsmouth Public Library is offering its patrons a deal: donate food to the Seacoast Family Food Pantry and they’ll forgive some overdue fines.

Rhett Sutphin via Flickr CC

Your dad made it look easy...maybe. But carving a turkey is a bit more complicated than you might think. It's a big bird, after all, and not every knife is created equal. (Nor is every bird, thanks to the "spatchcock" craze!)

But never fear, humble home-chef, there's somewhere to turn if you're confounded by the prospect of carving: YouTube. 

Listed below are some of the most informative and easy-to-follow turkey carving how-to videos on the site.

Pro Tip: Watch them in advance of the family arriving and you'll look like a turkey carving ninja come dinner time.

Jocelyn & Cathy via Flickr/CC - http://ow.ly/EeQ62

Yankee Magazine recently released the winners of its 2014 Editors Choice Food Awards. One of the New Hampshire honorees caught our attention: Moochie’s Macarons of Nashua.

Amy Quinton, NHPR

For the past several years, two men calling themselves The Fish Nerds have been on a quest to catch and eat all the species of New Hampshire freshwater fish. Their quest is now complete.

Clay Groves and Dave Kellam talked with All Things Considered about what they learned while trying to “Catch-m-All and Eat-m-All.”

How did this all get started?

Stef Noble via Flickr/CC http://ow.ly/CdH92

It’s apple season, and one of the most enjoyable ways to partake is the apple cider doughnut.

Amy Traverso is senior lifestyle editor at Yankee Magazine and author of The Apple Lover’s Cookbook.

She tells says even though New Hampshire has plenty of great cider doughnuts for sale, everyone should try making a batch at home at least once.

Chris Jensen for NHPR

A Colebrook woman is trying to make it easier for people to buy locally grown foods while giving farmers an economic boost. Her idea is a variation on the classic roadside farm stand, and it is a model that could be used around the state.

But it’s going to require a change in state law.

Cascadian Farm via Flickr/CC http://ow.ly/APWQE

Yes, the Market Basket dispute is over, but not all is rosy in the New Hampshire food world. Take for example, the legal challenge in Walpole between two ice cream shops.

Michael Samuels

Basil has been one of the big draws all summer at Dimond Hill Farm in Concord. 

“We give a sprig away for every customer who buys something,” says Yianna Coliandris, who works at the farmstand.

“Everyone was enjoying that, and it was absolutely thriving. It was beautiful, beautiful basil, and it tasted and smelled absolutely wonderful.”

But now customers will have to find basil elsewhere.

“This was the basil,” says Jane Presby, surveying a tenth of an acre of empty soil.

Sarah VanHorn, Manager of NH Community Seafood / N.H. Sea Grant

This is the second year for a New Hampshire program that brings the farm share model to fish.

It’s called New Hampshire Community Seafood, and it was the subject of a recent column by David Brooks, who writes the weekly Granite Geek science column for the Nashua Telegraph and Granite Geek.org. He joined us on All Things Considered to talk about the program.

Boscawen Community Kitchen Survey Underway

Aug 1, 2014
Emily Corwin, NHPR News

A New Hampshire college student's proposal for a community kitchen in Boscawen is in line to undergo a USDA-funded feasibility study.

A community kitchen would provide farmers and entrepreneurs with access to processing, packaging and storing facilities. For smaller enterprises, the access to such a facility would mean a chance for expanded production and profits.

Ale Viyie via Flickr Creative Commons

For years, Market Basket has called itself the store where you get more for your dollar.

And those longtime customers who are currently boycotting the chain over the firing of longtime CEO Arthur T. Demoulas say they’re spending more on groceries as they’re patronizing other stores.

Those worried about their grocery budgets might pick up a few tips from Erik August Johnson.

Michael Samuels

 

The blueberries are ripe and ready to pick at Apple Hill Farm in Concord.

Erin Urquhart / Putting Up With Erin

About 40 foodies are expected to show up at the Seacoast’s first community Food Swap this Sunday at Frank Jones Mansion in Portsmouth. 

Organizer Erin Urquhart says it works like this:

You get together and one person says 'ok I have two cans of blueberry jam, I have two pounds of carrots, I’m willing to swap for that,' and someone behind you says 'I have a sheet of brownies that I made, I want that instead.'

Brian Smestad, courtesy of Blue Tree LLC

A Mexican lime shortage had some NH bar owners worried. 

Margaritas, mojitos, gin and tonics... when you think of summer drinks, there's probably a lime in the picture. But up until a few weeks ago, this summer looked pretty grim – at least lime-wise.

“We were paying $50 a case to begin with,” says Jim Derosiers, “and then they jumped up to $150 a case and $175 a case.”

Desrosiers is the bar manager at Poco's Bow Street Cantina in Portsmouth. Every week, Poco's goes through about 15 cases of 250 limes each.

nseika via Flickr/CC - http://ow.ly/z98qI

The world of crowdfunding is awash in potato salad, thanks to a spud enthusiast in Ohio called Zack Danger Brown. Promising only that, upon raising ten dollars, he was going to make potato salad – “I haven't decided what kind yet” – Brown raised nearly $50,000 in two weeks on Kickstarter. (The total was well over $70,000 before Kickstarter cancelled several donations it said couldn’t be verified.)

Jeff Couturier via Flickr/CC - http://ow.ly/z1nyR

Winter feels far away right now, but farmers looking to grow winter crops - and there are a growing number of them -  are starting to think about what they’ll put in their greenhouses.

Michael Samuels

 

A Bedford coffee roaster offers a different kind of buzz.

A food market can be a cultural center for a neighborhood. The owner of an Asian market in Manchester is hoping to become just that, but first he must find a new space for his store. To learn more about the Saigon Asian Market we turned to Mark Hayward of the Union Leader who has written about the market’s struggle with the Manchester Zoning Board of Adjustment:

What can you tell us about this store and about its owner?

Allie Coremin via Flickr CC

Strawberry picking is a New Hampshire tradition that dates back to the days when “all natural” was a given, not a gimmick. There are over 20 farms throughout the state that offer the chance to “Pick-Your-Own” pint (or quart—more berries just means more jam). 

Related story: The Sweet Science (And Big Business) Of Strawberry Picking

The school year is drawing to a close, but next week a group of teens in Salem are heading back to the classroom - and the kitchen.

They're taking part in the Junior Chef program, a partnership between the Boys and Girls Club of Greater Salem and the Tuscan Kitchen restaurant.

Eddie Payne is an executive chef with the Tuscan Kitchen. He describes the program to NHPR's Brady Carlson.

Megan / Flickr CC

There are plenty of trails that lead to scenic vistas.  Up mountains, down into valleys.  But there's only one that leads to ice cream: The New Hampshire Ice Cream trail. 

Somewhere in a New Hampshire field, a cow, fawn colored, like a big deer, lifts her head from the tall grasses...

A Jersey cow, she has no idea that the milk she makes from the grass and hay and grain she eats is high in butterfat - about 5%, which makes her milk ideal for ice cream.

A family from Michigan is behind a newly opened brewery in the North Country.  Schilling Beer Company is located in an old grist mill next to the Ammonoosuc River in Littleton.

That fulfills the Cozzens' family dream of one day having such a business, said CEO Jeff Cozzens.  He and brothers Matt and Stuart, parents, Bruce and Kathy and a best friend, John Lenzini, opened The Schilling Beer Company last September.

It’s named for a grandfather, Richard Schilling.

Emily Corwin / NHPR

Smuttynose Brewing Company's new brewery opens Saturday in Hampton, NH.  Below is an audio postcard in which Smuttynose's "Master of Propoganda," JT Thompson, gives a tour of the $24 million energy efficient brewery, which produces 65,000 barrels of beer each day.

NHPR / Michael Brindley

 

Memorial Day weekend is once again upon us, which means many people across the Granite State will fire up their grills for the first time this year.

To celebrate this time-honored tradition, the Propane Gas Association of New England held its sixth-annual Outdoor Living Safety Day on the New Hampshire statehouse lawn on Thursday.

NHPR’s Michael Brindley went there to talk to people about what makes grilling so great and how to make sure it’s done safely.

Michael Samuels

 

Winter has finally left New Hampshire, and locavores can get their hands on a spring favorite.

Michael Samuels

 

An on-campus eatery makes sustainability a learning experience.

The 2014 Locavore Index again ranks New Hampshire's local food system as one of the strongest in the country, rating third behind Vermont and Maine.

Martin Langeveld of Strolling of the Heifers, the Vermont organization which produces the Locavore Index, talks with All Things Considered host Brady Carlson about how New Hampshire's food system is growing and changing.

Adam McCune for NHPR

In the late '90s, craft beer saw a renaissance of sorts. After years of nondescript light beers almost completely dominating the market, tastes seemed to wake up. Breweries and brew-pubs started up almost overnight. A boom was born.

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