New Hampshire Primary 2016

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Our Voters Guide provides an overview of all you need to know about the 2016 N.H. Presidential Primary.

Click here to explore a calendar of candidate visits and other Primary campaign events.

Click here for our Money in Politics stories and data interactives.

Visit our Where They Stand series for an overview of the candidates' positions on key policy questions.

Visit our series Primary Backstage to learn about the people and places that make the N.H. Primary tick.

To see NHPR photos from the campaign trail, visit our Primary 2016 album on Flickr.

Wikipedia

 

Real estate mogul and reality TV star Donald Trump is heading to New Hampshire as he again considers a presidential run.

Trump will attend a reception Thursday at the Amherst home of Republican state Rep. Steve Stepanek.

The visit comes one day after Trump announced plans to form a presidential exploratory committee, allowing him to raise money and hire staff as he weighs a White House bid. Trump says he's already hired political aides in the key early voting states of Iowa, New Hampshire and South Carolina.

josh rogers/nhpr

Ted Cruz says history shows the GOP has been ill-served by presidential candidates based on their perceived electability.

Cruz favors abolishing the IRS in favor of a flat tax, and repeatedly said he plays to repeal every word fo so-called Obamacare, says the way to to avoid what he called the mushy middle,  is draw a line in the sand and make the race a clear choice. If that happens, Cruz says, the right sort of conservative would win broad support.

Paige Sutherland/NHPR

U.S. Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont is making stops in the Granite State Monday as he continues to flirt with the idea of whether to run in next year’s presidential race.

The Senator says having the funds to support a competitive campaign is one of the major issues holding him back.

NHPR / Josh Rogers

It’s Monday morning. NHPR’s Josh Rogers joins Morning Edition to discuss developments on NH’s political front.

Lots of political activity over the weekend Jeb Bush, Scott Walker and Ted Cruz all paying their respects to local Republicans. House budget writers busy. Let’s start with presidential politics.

josh rogers/nhpr

Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker arrived in New Hampshire preaching small government and working to rebut claims he’s changed his stances on key issues.

His surging popularity among Republicans was on full display in Concord.

Unions protested outside his speech; Republicans inside cheered as Walker called for tax cuts and “eradicating” terrorism.

“We need a commander-in-chief who stands up and once and for all says our biggest problem is radical Islamic terrorism and we are going to do whatever it takes to weed it out all over the world.”

Josh Rogers/nhpr

Easygoing amid a swarm of media, the former Florida Governor chose a Hudson biotech firm for his first  N.H. stop in his likely presidential bid.

"I am joyfully pursuing the possibility of this," Bush said.

Along they way, Bush talked policy with members of the Nashua Chamber of Commerce. He faced questions on education and immigration, areas where his views are at odds with many conservatives in his party.

The  “grown up” approach to immigration policy, Bush told the crowd,  is to provide  undocumented immigrants a path to legal status.

josh rogers/nhpr

Rick Perry gave a morning speech at St. Anselm college. By lunch he was at a Concord law firm, stressing the executive experience he gained as Texas’s longest serving governor.

Perry described the national mood as "pessimistic," but said would take just a few good decisions -- particularly on energy policy -- to change that. He also called for for cooperation across the asile.

Credit: Gateway Tech/World Affairs Council via Flickr CC

The New Hampshire Primary is starting to heat up, with several prominent Republican presidential hopefuls expected in the Granite State this weekend.

NHPR’s Morning Edition producer Michael Brindley sat down with Dante Scala, an associate professor of political science at the University of New Hampshire.

A flood of potential 2016 Republican presidential candidates will be coming through the state this weekend. Can you just run through the list of who we’re going to see?

Josh Rogers / NHPR

 

A month after his last visit, former Texas Gov. Rick Perry is returning to New Hampshire as he moves closer to a 2016 presidential campaign.

Since leaving office in January, Perry has been ramping up his political operation and traveling to early voting states. He will be in Bedford, Concord and Gorham on Thursday, followed by stops in Lancaster, Littleton, Meredith and Belmont on Friday.

Evan Vucci/AP

Fresh off a trip to Iowa, Lindsey Graham spent Sunday afternoon at the Snowshoe Club in Concord.

Standing before a crackling fire, Graham told about 50 Republicans the GOP must lead on tax and entitlement reform, but most of all on national security.

"Congress and the Republican Party lost their way. We became the party of the tax cut rather than the party of national defense. Without national defense there can be no social security." 

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Vice President Joe Biden paid a visit to Wednesday. He collected an award at UNH law school, visited a community college and promoted the Obama administration’s economic record.

Speaking at the Warren Rudman center at UNH law, Biden told a crowd that included Rudman’s children that the former NH senator embodied public service and the ethos of his state.

"He served forthright, frugal and fair, everything about him, everything about him."

Democratic Party Dynamics Heading Into 2016

Feb 25, 2015
DonkeyHotey / Flickr/CC

Although attention has been focused on the GOP field of presidential hopefuls, there are also interesting developments among Democrats, including unflagging efforts among progressives to convince the seemingly unmoved Senator Elizabeth Warren to run.  We’ll look at these dynamics in the context of policy debates within the party.

GUESTS:

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Marco Rubio’s stop at the Lawrence barn in Hollis was a freewheeling affair. The Senator accepted a jug of maple syrup, preached a message of opportunity, and  took questions that ranged from how to get money out of politics to whether the President ought to be impeached, to immigration.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Florida US Senator Marco Rubio is in New Hampshire today. It’s part of a two day visit that’s largely seen as an early campaign trip of sorts by a political figure hoping to win the Republican Party’s presidential nomination in 2016.

Rubio has made a number of moves ahead of an expected presidential bid – he’s hired staff in New Hampshire, and he’s also used his political action committee to donate money to state and local officials and candidates, in this state and others that hold early primaries and caucuses.

U.S. Sen. Marco Rubio of Florida is in New Hampshire to interact directly with voters who will help determine his presidential fate.

Rubio, a Republican, is traveling to key early voting states to promote his book,  American Dreams.

Rubio's trip to New Hampshire includes a Q-and-A session with voters in Hollis and a book signing in Manchester on Monday. He'll also speak at `Politics & Eggs' on Tuesday in Manchester.

AP Photo

  Potential Republican candidate for president, John Bolton is visiting New Hampshire today. He is scheduled to speak during a Politics and Eggs event hosted by The New England Council and The New Hampshire Institute of Politics at Saint Anselm College.

The visit by the former U.N. Ambassador was originally scheduled for late January but was postponed due to snowy weather.

Other potential candidates are expected to arrive in the Granite State next week including Florida Senator Marco Rubio and former Maryland Governor Bob Ehrlich.

Gage Skidmore via Flickr CC

  Republican New Jersey Governor Chris Christie is returning to New Hampshire today. He’s scheduled to speak at a dinner in Concord at 6pm.

Christie was a frequent visitor to the Granite State last year. He made a number of trips to stump for Republican gubernatorial candidate Walt Havenstein.

Christie is being eyed as a potential GOP candidate for president in twenty-sixteen. 

Carol Robidoux for NHPR

With less than a year to go before the 2016 New Hampshire primary, the Granite State is starting to see more and more visits from potential hopefuls – so far mostly on the Republican side.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Former Texas Gov. Rick Perry was talking about the weather when he told New Hampshire voters he's "just warming up," but he also says he's carefully preparing for a possible presidential campaign.

In Bedford on Wednesday, Perry joked about the 80-degree difference in temperature between New Hampshire and Texas this week. But his main message to business leaders was that the federal government has failed them by not providing predictability and stability in taxes and regulation.

As the measles outbreak continues to spread, political leaders with an eye on the White House in 2016 spent much of the week jumping into, and then trying to bail themselves out of, the vaccine debate.

Some brushed the issue off as an unnecessary media circus, but it's worth taking a look at its deeper political meaning. Here are five things the vaccine politics kerfuffle of 2015 tells us about the emerging field of presidential candidates for 2016.

1. Vaccination politics are a problem for Republicans — not Democrats.

NHPR / Michael Brindley

    

Former New York Governor George Pataki is in New Hampshire this week, as he weighs a run for president in 2016.

He joins Morning Edition to talk about his visit to the Granite State.

You’ve said you may be running for president, but you’ve said that before. What’s different this time?

NHPR Staff

After bowing out of a third run for president, Mitt Romney is now set to deliver the commencement address at a New Hampshire college this spring.

Saint Anselm College says the former Massachusetts governor and 2012 Republican presidential nominee will also receive an honorary degree at the ceremony in May.

Romney had been hinting at another run for president, but made clear last week he decided not to join the long list of high-profile Republicans said to be considering running in 2016.

Josh Rogers for NHPR

On The Political Front is our weekly conversation with NHPR's Senior Political Reporter Josh Rogers. This week, what Mitt Romney's exit means for 2016, and a look at the issues up for debate this week at the N.H. Statehouse.

Let’s start with Presidential politics – Mitt Romney won't make said a third run for president. What was more surprising, that he said no, or that he was thinking of running again in the first place?

Josh Rogers for NHPR

Mitt Romney’s decision to skip a third run for president leaves the New Hampshire's GOP presidential primary without a clear early front-runner.  

Mitt Romney had been publicly flirting with a 2016 run for the past three weeks. On Wednesday he made a campaign-style trip to Mississippi, but little more than a day later he used conference calls to tell his staunchest backers that he’s decided it is best to clear the way for others leaders in his party.

Jim Merrill ran both of Romney’s N.H. campaigns. He said he didn’t see this coming.

Updated at 11:58 a.m.

Former Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney isn't running for president in 2016, he told supporters in a statement.

"After putting considerable thought into making another run for president, I've decided it is best to give other leaders in the Party the opportunity to become our next nominee," he said in the statement and in a conference call with supporters.

www.walker.wis.gov

 

Wisconsin Republican Gov. Scott Walker is headed to New Hampshire for the first time in March.

His campaign confirmed to The Associated Press on Thursday that Walker will be giving the keynote speech March 14 at an event organized by the New Hampshire Republican Party.

Walker says in a statement issued by the New Hampshire state party that he looks forward to sharing what he called a "common sense conservative message with grassroots activists."

NHPR Staff/Photo of Jeb Bush courtesy World Affairs Council, Chris Christie photo courtesy NJ National Guard

There’s still a year to go before any ballots are cast in New Hampshire’s first-in-the-nation primary.

Still, that hasn’t stopped Republicans expected to make a run for president from hitting the campaign trail in the Granite State.

Chris Galdieri is an assistant professor of politics at St. Anselm College who specializes in presidential races.

He joins Morning Edition to give us a roundup of how the field of candidates is taking shape.

1.15.15: The Invisible Primary and Authentic Brands

Jan 15, 2015
cmh2315fl via flickr Creative Commons / flic.kr/p/neZUmD

New Hampshire’s first-in-the-nation primary may be a year away, but presidential hopefuls are already jockeying for position. Today,we’ll talk about why you should forget election fatigue and start paying attention to the race now – and we'll talk about signs that a politician is considering a run at the presidency.

And we'll continue our series on offbeat college courses, the Uncommon Core, with Beauty Pageants 101.

Listen to the full show and click Read more for individual segments.

Pity the poor guys who are trying to run for president while still serving as governors.

All the media attention this week went to former Govs. Mitt Romney and Jeb Bush, because Romney suddenly decided to call in his chits and get back in the presidential conversation for 2016. Virtually every news organization in North America instantly got wide-eyed about it.

Emily Corwin / NHPR

U.S. Sen. Rand Paul, a likely Republican presidential candidate, is returning to New Hampshire with a full day of events including meetings with lawmakers, activists and business leaders.

Paul's visit will begin Wednesday with a breakfast in Manchester with state legislators. He'll then meet privately with Manchester Mayor Ted Gatsas, attend a pro-Second Amendment rally, speak at a forum on Common Core, tour a charter school and end the day meeting with business leaders and activists.

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