New Hampshire Primary 2016

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Our Voters Guide provides an overview of all you need to know about the 2016 N.H. Presidential Primary.

Click here to explore a calendar of candidate visits and other Primary campaign events.

Click here for our Money in Politics stories and data interactives.

Visit our Where They Stand series for an overview of the candidates' positions on key policy questions.

Visit our series Primary Backstage to learn about the people and places that make the N.H. Primary tick.

To see NHPR photos from the campaign trail, visit our Primary 2016 album on Flickr.

Casey McDermott, NHPR

At campaign stops in Henniker and Hooksett on Wednesday, Texas Senator Ted Cruz riffed heavily on his ideas for reforming Washington, directing plenty of anger at the so-called political establishment.

And in this way, the Republican presidential candidate said he’s found some common ground with Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders, one of his Democratic rivals.

Richard Taylor and his wife Susan linger in the stands of a hockey rink in Bow at about 9 o'clock in the morning. Marco Rubio’s just finished a town hall. Like most of the people I come across at Rubio's campaign stops, Taylor says he’s weighing Rubio against another candidate—in most cases that’s Ted Cruz.

Campaigning in Goffstown Ted Cruz said that Donald Trump is "losing it" because he can't handle having been beaten in the Iowa caucus. Trump has alleged Cruz stole his win in Iowa.

Jason Moon for NHPR

 Campaigning in Derry this morning, Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton defended what she called her progressive credentials.

NHPR Staff/Allegra Boverman for NHPR

No presidential candidate has more of a history with the Granite State than Hillary Clinton. Her comeback win here eight years ago set off what became a long battle for the Democratic nomination, which of course, Clinton ultimately lost to Barack Obama.

Brian Snyder / Reuters

At a rally in Milford Tuesday night, Donald Trump said he was fine with finishing second in the Iowa caucus, and that second would be a fine result for New Hampshire, too.

But Trump's local supporters remain bullish on his chances to win here.

You scarcely needed to put the question to attendees at Donald Trump’s first post-Iowa campaign event; all you had to do was look at the long line than snaked through the parking lot of the Hampshire Hills Athletic club to know that for Trump’s local backers, his loss in Iowa is no deal breaker.

Sam Evans-Brown / NHPR

At seven in the morning the day after the Iowa caucus, Breakfast at Laney's in Somersworth is pretty quiet. The 6 AM crowd has moved out and the 9:30 "rush" is still rolling out of bed.

As a campaign stop, the diner has been similarly quiet: Only four candidates have visited Somersworth this election season -- Chris Christie, Jeb Bush, Rand Paul and Martin O'Malley -- and none have dropped by since November. 


Paige Sutherland/NHPR

Republican presidential candidate Chris Christie has visited New Hampshire more than 60 times and held dozens of town halls since he first announced he was running. He campaigned here the night of the Iowa Caucus on Monday and the next day he added five more stops through the southern part of the state.

Christie has been banking on a strong finish in New Hampshire and with less than a week to go he's hoping all that face-time will translate to votes next Tuesday. 

Michael Brindley/NHPR

Sometimes it can seem like everyone’s talking about the primary, especially now that it’s a week away.

But history shows there are certain groups of people who aren’t as likely to head out to the polls on Tuesday.

One of those pockets of the population is low-income people.

Natasha Haverty

Florida Senator and Republican presidential candidate Marco Rubio kicked off the final stretch in New Hampshire with a rally in Exeter last night. 


Jason Moon for NHPR

After a close finish in Iowa, both remaining Democratic presidential contenders - Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders - headed straight for the Granite State yesterday.

 

They each came claiming a victory.

Casey McDermott, NHPR

On stage at the Crossing Life Church in Windham, Texas Senator Ted Cruz told voters his first-place finish in Iowa the night before was thanks to the same kind of coalition that united behind Ronald Reagan three decades ago.

Donald Trump likes to point out that, unlike everyone else running for president in 2016, he’s got the money to pay his own way to the Republican nomination.

Dustin Oliver / Flickr/CC

After months of following campaigns, polls upon polls, and debates, voters in the Hawkeye State finally have their say -- with the Iowa caucuses officially launching the presidential nomination process. We'll discuss the results and how they might affect our First in the Nation Primary, just a week away.

Jack Rodolico

Around 6 am last Friday, the Mt. Pisgah Diner in Winchester was packed with regulars: people who come to share good food at a small counter. The diner's owner, Joni Otto, says no presidential candidate has ever graced her doorway.

But that doesn't mean politics is missing from the menu.

Allegra Boverman / NHPR

New Hampshire voters head to the polls next week with plenty to think about. And many of them have been thinking, comparing, contrasting, deciding, and un-deciding on candidates for a while now. NHPR has been following up with a handful of voters through the campaign to hear how their final decisions have been shaped by a long primary season. Today we hear from three of them.


Emily Corwin / NHPR

  For the past three days, the presidential candidates have been busy getting out the vote in Iowa. That is: everyone except John Kasich.  The Republican Ohio governor has been in New Hampshire since Friday, where, for once, he had the campaign trail to himself. 

flickr by liewcf

It’s illegal to leave a prerecorded voicemail for someone on the “do not call” registry — even if the call was placed by a live caller — according to the New Hampshire Attorney General’s office.

Primary 2016: Tax Policy on the Campaign Trail

Feb 1, 2016
Ken Teegardin / Flickr/CC

The Presidential candidates have proposed major changes -- from replacing the income tax with a national sales tax, to raising taxes to fund universal health care. We’ll dive into the differences and discuss what new tax policies could mean for you.

Paige Sutherland/NHPR

You would have had a hard time finding presidential candidates in the state this past weekend – most were in Iowa ahead of Monday's caucus.

 

But that doesn’t mean campaigns ignored New Hampshire – particularly Hillary Clinton’s.

 

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

"On the Policital Front" is our weekly check-in with NHPR's Senior Political Reporter Josh Rogers.

The Iowa caucuses are known for hoisting the little-known hopeful to glory. But for each skyrocket that actually launched here, many more have fizzled on the pad.

The slick talkers auditioning for media gigs.

The household name whose prominence fails to translate.

The ambitious up-and-comer seeking name recognition for the future.

The nonpolitician who strikes a nerve the year before the election year.

After Iowa, the bell tolls for these.

For every Obama ...

Natasha Haverty / NHPR

Primary elections have a tendency to push candidates to the political extreme—fire up the base and draw bright lines around the issues. But during the New Hampshire presidential primary, where political independents play a central role those tactics often mean the campaign rhetoric sometimes doesn’t line up with how voters actually think.

Here are a few voters feeling that disconnect on one issue: guns.


 

The tentative deal reached this weekend between the presidential campaigns of Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders includes a debate Thursday at the University of New Hampshire in Durham.

MSNBC announced Sunday it will host the debate, scheduled for 9 p.m. Eastern with Chuck Todd and Rachel Maddow moderating. New Hampshire's first-in-the nation primary is Feb. 9.

AP Photo/Patrick Semansky

All three Democratic presidential candidates will take part in a town hall event in Derry Wednesday night, less than a week before the New Hampshire primary.

The event will be broadcast on CNN starting at 8 p.m., with host Anderson Cooper moderating. 

Coming off the Iowa caucuses, former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, and former Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley will all look to make their closing arguments to Granite State voters.

Donald Trump has not only caused deep divisions in the GOP establishment, but he's also exposed a stark divide within the evangelical community.

Monday's Iowa caucuses are being billed, as they are every election season, as "a fight for the soul of the Party," both Democratic and Republican.

Yes, it's a worn-out cliché, but especially on the Republican side this year, it's a real battle.

Iowa and New Hampshire get a lot of attention, but their records in picking presidents, let alone nominees, is spotty (as you can see from the chart above). But that doesn't mean the states don't matter. They have been effective at weeding the field of candidates, and they're about momentum for those later states.

Plus, in the last 40 years, just one person has gone on to win the presidency after losing both Iowa and New Hampshire — Bill Clinton.

Here's how the predictability of the states breaks down by party:

Sara Plourde for NHPR

The candidates are all in Iowa stumping for caucus votes, but Brady is here to round up the latest primary news, like whether TV debates are having a bigger effect on the primary than old-school retail politics.

Plus: what Donald Trump rallies have in common with arena rock concerts or screenings of The Rocky Horror Picture Show, and campaign voicemails magically transformed into garbled emails! 

Listen to the podcast here or subscribe on iTunes.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Donald Trump was back in New Hampshire Friday. The GOP front-runner congratulated himself for skipping the GOP debate in Iowa and went after Republican rival Ted Cruz. 

Trump told a capacity crowd at a hotel ballroom that "in theory" he would have rather done the debate because he's leading, but believes his decision paid off.

"I took a chance and we did something, and I don't know the end result. I heard went we up but we did the right thing. We did the right thing because we did something great for veterans."

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