N.H. Primary 2012

Final results: Summary results | Town results

The Basics

The New Hampshire primary is a mainstay in American electoral politics.  Every four years, voters gather to help determine the Republican and/or Democratic nominee for President.  While the state only has 12 electoral votes in 2012 (normally it’s 24, but the Republican National Committee penalized the state party for moving up the event date), the primary’s position as one of the earliest contests gives the state out-sized influence over the nomination process.

Only the Iowa caucuses come before New Hampshire’s primary.  Traditionally, New Hampshire’s broad-based primary contest has been seen as a counter-weight to Iowa’s more drawn-out caucus process, which tends to draw a smaller core of party faithful.  In the case of the 2012 Republican race, New Hampshire’s electorate is seen to represent the more libertarian-leaning, fiscally conservative wing of the party, while Iowa voters are seen as representing the socially conservative wing of the GOP base.

N.H. Primary summary provided by StateImpact - NH reporter, Amanda Loder

The Four Faces of the Republican Party

Dec 8, 2015
Jim Cole

In a new book, political scholar Dante Scala and his co-author Henry Olsen look at the four factions that have defined the GOP presidential nomination process, which Scala says is misunderstood and misinterpreted by the media and the so-called conventional wisdom.

 

 

GUEST:

  • Dante Scala - associate professor of political science at UNH, a fellow at the Carsey School of Public Policy, and co-author of the brand-new book The Four Faces of the Republican Party.
OZinOH via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/4iiMnW

The US says it will open its doors to at least 10,000 refugees fleeing turmoil in Syria, but that doesn’t mean open arms. Today, we’ll learn about the detention process that keeps asylum seekers behind bars for months – even years – in hidden facilities across the country. Plus, a look at the upcoming lineup for this weekend’s New Hampshire Film Festival – including a documentary about the Gore Vidal vs. William F. Buckley debates that turned televised political debates into blood sport. 

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Texas Governor Rick Perry’s itinerary  -- meetings with core Republican activists, stops at colleges, and a speech at an event celebrating the anniversary of the founding of the U.S. Marine Corps – was very much that of a candidate. 

In his remarks at the Marine event, Perry cited Russia, Iran, and ISIS, as reasons why the U.S. cannot afford a foreign policy, that is, as he put it, “lacking in clarity.” 

Courtney Cania / NHPR

Former Utah Gov. Jon Huntsman says he's ruling out another run for the White House in 2016.

Huntsman told reporters in Salt Lake City on Wednesday that he was replying with a "strong no" when asked if he would enter the upcoming presidential race.

Huntsman briefly ran for the Republican presidential nomination in 2012.

Earlier this year, Huntsman said he was open to another bid, but he later told the Deseret News he had no plans for a campaign.

NHPR / Michael Brindley

The same day he was arraigned on abuse of power charges, Texas Governor Rick Perry kicked off a two-day visit to New Hampshire, fueling speculation about another presidential bid.

Speaking at an Americans for Prosperity event in Manchester on Friday, Governor Rick Perry didn’t shy away from the indictment handed down last week.

“This indictment isn’t about me. This is a lot bigger than me. It’s about the state system of constitutional checks and balances. We’ll prevail.”

Sam Evans-Brown / NHPR

The leading candidates for U.S. Senate met for debates Thursday in North Conway.

The debate, hosted by the Mount Washington Valley Economic Council, ranged from Obamacare to medical marijuana, from the Veteran's Affairs to the National Security Agency. And with the increasing instability in the Middle East the candidates spent plenty of time airing their views on the situation in Iraq.

The University of New Hampshire is opening up its class on the state's leadoff presidential primary to a wider audience through a Massive Open Online Course.  The course will be offered in the fall of 2015 and will build on a popular class the university has offered for the last several election cycles. Those participating from afar will be able to watch lectures and presentations from classroom guests and join in on discussions.  They won't earn college credit, and the university is still deciding how much they will be charged.

Former New York Mayor Rudy Giuliani is giving a talk on leadership at the University of New Hampshire law school.

Giuliani, who served as mayor from 1994 to 2011, will deliver a presentation called "Leadership in the 21st Century" on Tuesday in Concord.

Afterward, Concord Mayor Jim Bouley will present Giuliani with a key to the city.

In the North Country Millsfield wants to regain a spot it held six decades ago: Being the first place to vote in the presidential election.

That goes back to just after midnight in November 1952 when the seven voters of Millsfield, which straddles Route 26 between Errol and the Dixville, cast the first votes in the presidential election, according to Time magazine article.

Jimmy Wayne via Flickr CC

Utah lawmakers have advanced a bill that would move the state’s presidential primary ahead of New Hampshire’s.

Legislation approved by the House Monday gives lawmakers the option of holding an online election, provided it is “held before any other caucus, primary, or other event selecting a nominee in the nation.”

If approved by the Senate and signed by Gov. Gary Herbert, the bill, HB 410, would require the state to fund the Western State Primary, at an estimated cost of $1.6 million.

February 28th marks thirty years since the 1984 New Hampshire presidential primary. The ’84 election is often overlooked today – mostly because the general election saw Republican President Ronald Reagan beat Democrat Walter Mondale in a landslide - and yet, the 1984 primary was fairly influential.

Today marks thirty years since the 1984 New Hampshire primary. It’s a contest not well remembered today – on the Republican side, President Ronald Reagan was running essentially unopposed, and the man who won the Democratic nomination, Walter Mondale, not only lost the New Hampshire primary, he lost the general election in a landslide.

Sara Plourde

Characterized by partisan gridlock, grandstanding and an unwillingness to compromise, the 113th Congress is well on its way to becoming the least productive legislature in American history. Elected officials increasingly hail from the ideological fringes of their respective parties, leaving little room for moderation, dialogue or consensus around even routine issues.  The march to the partisan battlelines -- some argue -- starts long before a candidate is sworn in. It begins during the primary, when extreme views draw audiences and media attention away from the moderate middle. Today, we’re prodding one of New Hampshire’s sacred cows by asking whether it’s time to dramatically reforming the way we do primaries.

Aaron Web via Flickr Creative Commons

Here's what you had to say:

"I'd feel like we'd become more insignificant than we already are."

"Wouldn't bother me at all."

"It would be a real blow to the economy and to the ego of the state... I think the nation would lose out if we didn't have the presidential primary anymore.

"[I would feel] less stressed."

"I'm not really into politics.  I probably wouldn't care."

From the early days of the 2012 primary, influential liberals referred to Jon Hunstman, U.S. Ambassador to China, and Singapore before that, as “the sane Republican”.  Huntsman’s foreign policy chops and statesmen-like manner were frequently cited during his brief run, often by the candidate himself.  

Hassan's Win Powered By $11 Million In Outside Spending

Nov 16, 2012
Paul Filippov

By the time her victory over Ovide Lamontagne in the 2012 governor's race was in the books, Maggie Hassan had raised more than $1.9 million in contributions from some 7,550 individual donors.

After a recount Thursday, Republican incumbent  Lyle “Rusty” Bulis lost his seat in Grafton District 1, to another Republican Ralph Doolan.

Both are from Littleton.

Originally Doolan lost to Bulis by two votes and sought the recount.

The recount had Doolan winning by four votes.

There are two seats in District 1, which includes Littleton and Bethlehem.

The other seat was taken by Linda Massimilla, a Democrat and novice politician from Littleton. She beat beat incumbent Bulis and Doolan on November 6.

President Obama and gubernatorial candidate Maggie Hassan were the winners in Coos County on Tuesday.

According to official results now available from the New Hampshire Secretary of State  Obama received 9,095 votes in Coos compared to 6,342 for Mitt Romney.

Towns that voted for Romney included Clarksville; Colebrook; Columbia; Errol; Jefferson; Pittsburg and Stewartstown.

But those victories were offset by areas including Berlin where Romney had 1,248 votes compared to Obama’s 2,863.

All Three N.H. Ballot Measures Fail

Nov 8, 2012

New Hampshire voters showed a reluctance to change the state constitution in Tuesday’s election, rejecting one amendment that would have banned a personal income tax and another that would have given the legislature more control over the judiciary.

Marc Nozell for NHPR

Tuesday's election in New Hampshire made history, as two female candidates for Congress, Ann McLane Kuster and Carol Shea-Porter beat their Republican opponents, joining U.S. Senators Jeanne Shaheen (D-NH) and Kelly Ayotte (R-NH) in Washington. 

Democratic Governor-Elect Maggie Hassan will be the only female Democratic governor in January. 

Long Lines At Polls Not Because Of Voter ID Law

Nov 7, 2012
Manchester Polls
Susan Posner / NHPR

New Hampshire Elections officials say they heard a fair number of complaints about long lines at the polls.  But as they say something other than the new voter ID law is to blame.

Talk of long lines at the polls was common on Election Day.  And for Republican gubernatorial candidate Ovide Lamontagne, it even affected how Election Night played out. As supporters saw more and more returns favoring Democrat Maggie Hassan, a spokeswoman addressed the crowd.

Coos: A Summary

Nov 7, 2012

Here’s what happened in Coos County on Tuesday, according to a tally by the Associated Press. Official counts from the Secretary of State are not yet available.

* Jeff Woodburn of Dalton was elected senator, defeating Debi Warner of Littleton. He takes the place of Republican John Gallus who chose not to run.

* In District 1 with all ten precincts counted Republican incumbent Duffy Daugherty of Colebrook lost to  Democrat Larry Enman of Errol by 20 votes.

Enman had 1,158 votes.

In Coos District 4 Republican incumbent Herbert Richardson beat Democrat Troy Merner, according to results compiled by the Associated Press.

With all the votes counted Richardson had 1,167 votes compared to Merner’s 821.

Kuster acceptance speech
Shannon Dooling for NHPR

It was a repeat match-up with a very different outcome in the Second Congressional District.  Democrat Ann McLane Kuster defeated Republican Congressman Charlie Bass by a roughly five point margin.  

NHPR

A victorious Maggie Hassan took the stage on Tuesday night to accept the state’s corner office.  She began by thanking voters for their trust – then launched into some specifics. "We will build a New Hampshire that will nurture innovation and entrepreneurs," Hassan said, "where businesses can and want to grow. Where young people will stay and work and create their own companies." 

In Grafton District 2 Democrat Rebecca Brown of Sugar Hill beat Republican Denis P. Ward of Monroe, according to a tally compiled by the Associated Press.

Brown had 1,365 votes while Ward received 1,198.

In Coos District 3, Berlin, three Democrat incumbents - Gary Coulombe, Robert Theberge and Yvonne Thomas – were all re-elected.

They defeated Republican challenger Eric Catman, who hoped to take one of the three seats.

With all the votes counted Coulombe had 2,940 votes; Theberge had 2,651 and Thomas had 2,426.

Catman was a distant fourth with 1,029, according to a tally compiled by the Associated Press.

Voters and Voices at the Polls

Nov 6, 2012
Ali Kuzmickas / New Hampshire Public Radio

In case the profuse amount of “I Voted” stickers went unnoticed to you today, the first Tuesday in November is indeed upon us. Polling locations in Concord, New Hampshire teemed with signs and supporters providing some last minute rallying for their favorite candidates. Voters stood in line and braved the early morning chill to cast their vote at Wards 4 and 7. With them were Word of Mouth interns Bill Barry and Ali Kuzmickas.

NHPR / Sam Evans-Brown

This race is real bellwether for a number of reasons: the district itself demographically perfectly balanced between liberal and conservative voters, both candidates have held the seat before meaning they are more-or-less on equal footing in terms of name recognition, and both are party stalwarts have voted with their partys’ leadership high in 90th the percentile.

Chris Jensen for NHPR

In the towns of Dalton and Whitefield in Coos County voting was heavy Tuesday morning.

Dalton Town Moderator Ann Craxton seemed quite pleased with the way things were going.

“The turnout for us has been very heavy. We have 540 registered voters. We have more than 50 that voting absentee and here by 10 o’clock in the morning we’ve already had 80 come through the polls.

Beyond that Craxton says the voters are an eager and happy bunch.

Pages