NH's Immigration Story

Our 9 month series, New Hampshire's Immigration Story explored just that... the vast history of who came to New Hampshire, when they came, why they came, the challenges they faced once they landed on Granite State soil and the contributions that they brought to our state. The Exchange, Word of Mouth, and our News Department looked at the issue of immigration from its first arrivals to the newest refugees calling New Hampshire home.

We saw how immigration affects our economy, health care, education system, culture and our current system of law. We also looked at what's going on in New Hampshire today, as we uncovered the groups, societies and little known people who are making an impact all over the state.

Funding for NH's Immigration Story is brought to you in part by: New Hampshire Humanities Council, Norwin S. and Elizabeth N. Bean Foundation, The Gertrude Couch Trust

Emily Corwin for NHPR

As immigration officials ramp up deportation of new classes of unauthorized immigrants, more residents and visitors without documents fear run-ins with police.

On New Hampshire's diverse Southern border, a traffic stop in one town could lead to very different consequences than the same kind of stop one town over.

  Refugee resettlement has resumed in New Hampshire after a federal judge halted President Donald Trump’s executive order temporarily banning refugees.

A federal appeals court last week refused to reinstate the president’s order, which also bans immigration from seven predominantly Muslim countries.

Allison Quantz for NHPR

Dartmouth College is joining other Ivy League schools in opposing President Trump’s immigration order.

The Hanover-based school, along with 16 other elite institutions, filed a legal brief in a New York federal court on Monday. The colleges and universities argue that the travel ban, which is currently on hold following a federal appeals court ruling, would harm their ability to attract and educate the world’s best scholars.

Ryan Caron King / New England News Collaborative

New Hampshire’s refugee resettlement agencies are moving fast to bring at least six refugees to the state before February 17th. That’s after a Federal Judge on Friday blocked parts of a Trump Administration executive order, including a 120-day ban on refugee admissions, and an indefinite ban on all immigration from Syria.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

As President Donald Trump’s executive order on refugees garners strong reaction from around the country, officials in Durham and Portsmouth have begun discussions about potentially declaring themselves sanctuary cities.

Officials in both communities say they’ve heard from residents about the idea, possibly as part of a coordinated campaign.

Episcopal Church of New Hampshire

Faith leaders in New Hampshire are speaking out against President Donald Trump's executive order that stops refugees from entering the country.

Christian, Muslim and Jewish leaders are looking to their faith to explain their opposition to the immigration and refugee ban.

  An organization that resettles refugees in New Hampshire says 11 individuals cleared to arrive in the state next month have been blocked by President Trump’s executive order.

Trump’s order halted new refugees from entering the country for 120 days during a review of the vetting process.

Amy Marchildon with Ascentria Care Alliance in Concord says seven families – 11 individuals in total – from Myanmar and the Democratic Republic of Congo were set to be resettled in Concord and Nashua next month after two years of screening.

Emily Corwin / NHPR

President Donald Trump's executive order on immigration, signed Friday, has stirred anxiety and uncertainty among refugees and those who work with them. In New Hampshire’s biggest city, Muktar Osman is in the middle of it.

Sara Plourde / New England News Collaborative, NHPR

While Republican governors in Massachusetts and Vermont expressed concern over the weekend about President Trump’s recent executive order on immigration and refugees, New Hampshire Gov. Chris Sununu took a more neutral stance when weighing in on the issue Monday.

The Immigration Order: Impact on the Granite State

Jan 30, 2017
Kitt Hodsden; Wikimedia Commons

New Hampshire reaction to the Trump immigration order. We hear from an array of Granite State voices:  politicians who feel this will, in the end, make the state safer.  Immigrants and refugees worried about their families and their futures. Colleges who welcome foreign students.  And major employers from hi-tech to hospitals.

GUESTS:

Amy Markus

(This post will be updated as new information and reactions from New Hampshire officials are made available.)

Emily Corwin / NHPR

New Hampshire Lawmakers filed into the State House cafeteria Thursday for some free international food. Like it or not, their meal came with a side of conversation -- about how immigrants benefit New Hampshire.

Pierre-Alexandre Garneau via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/8GW6WZ

A team of reporters tracking police shootings discovered an alarming trend - people brandishing phony weapons getting shot in confrontations with cops.  Today, we'll learn about real fatalities with fake guns and why the pro-gun lobby is protecting the right to bear imitation arms.

Also today, a New Hampshire high school confronts stereotypes and the national spike in hate crimes by asking refugee students to talk about their lives and cultures. 

Boston Public Library via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/bbjDXk

There’s a new lesson plan at Concord High and it couldn’t have come at a better time.

Anna-Marie DiPasquale, the school’s social worker, started a new project this past fall called “Travel around the World.” The project allows Ms. DiPasquale to visit different classrooms with small groups of refugee students sharing their cultures and traditions firsthand.

MONUSCO / Abel Kavanagh; Flickr

About a dozen Syrians were resettled in New Hampshire last year, and more than 7000 refugees from many countries have come here since the 1980s.  We look at the resettlement process, the challenges both newcomers and their host communities face, and what changes might be in store under a Trump administration.


Joe Plocki via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/Dgd7R

California newspapers once wrote that Chinese immigrants had "most of the vices and few of the virtues of the African". Until 1940, Asian Americans earned less than whites...and less than black Americans too. All that changed just a few generations.  Today, how Asian Americans became a "model minority."

Then, from unidentified noises to a story of heartbreaking loss, we scour the audio landscape for sound we can't help but share. Morning Edition host Rick Ganley joins us for the latest installment of Overheard.

New England is an old region, and not just by historical standards.

The population here is aging faster than almost any other place in the country. Fewer people are having children, and many of the states struggle to keep younger generations living and working here.

And as New England's baby boomers grow older, and live longer, the need for health care workers also grows.

Ryan Caron King | NENC

It’s hard to avoid the hand-wringing about aging demographics in New England these days. The region's six states have the six lowest birth rates in the country. Maine, New Hampshire, and Vermont have the oldest populations in the country, and Connecticut, Rhode Island and Massachusetts aren't far behind.

The organization that handles refugee resettlement in Manchester says  it’s seen an uptick in volunteers there over the course of the presidential campaign season.  

Usually, a case manager drives new refugee families to apply for things like fuel assistance.  But on Monday, a volunteer made the trip, said  Amadou Hamady, the Manchester site director of the International Institute of New England.

Flickr Creative Commons / Brave Sir Robin

Amid uncertainty about the future of the country’s immigration laws under a Trump administration, Dartmouth is trying to reassure undocumented students that they’re welcome on campus — and that the school will try to protect them from potential changes in the law that might be in store.

New England Readies For Trump’s Refugee Plans

Nov 23, 2016
Allegra Boverman for NHPR

President-elect Donald Trump hasn’t elaborated much on immigration policy, beyond what he laid out during the campaign.  But enough has been said that many believe he will limit the number of refugees allowed into the U.S.

Before the election, at numerous campaign events, then candidate Donald Trump made it clear he would not be putting out the welcome mat for refugees from Syria, who now number in the millions.

Note: This story was reported as part of the New England News Collaborative.

One New Hampshire City, Two Immigration Stories

Oct 26, 2016

Pam Colantuono and Minata Toure have never met. But they have a few things in common.

They both live in Manchester. They’re both moms. And the biggest thing they share — the thing that shapes both their lives and how they see the world — is the classic American immigration story.


National security has proven to be a pivotal issue in this year's Senate race between Sen. Kelly Ayotte and Gov. Maggie Hassan.

Ayotte, a Republican, has cast herself as a strong advocate for the nation's security, pointing to her record in the Senate. Hassan, a Democrat, has taken some positions that put her at odds with her own party and President Obama.

Pages