NH's Immigration Story

Our 9 month series, New Hampshire's Immigration Story explored just that... the vast history of who came to New Hampshire, when they came, why they came, the challenges they faced once they landed on Granite State soil and the contributions that they brought to our state. The Exchange, Word of Mouth, and our News Department looked at the issue of immigration from its first arrivals to the newest refugees calling New Hampshire home.

We saw how immigration affects our economy, health care, education system, culture and our current system of law. We also looked at what's going on in New Hampshire today, as we uncovered the groups, societies and little known people who are making an impact all over the state.

Funding for NH's Immigration Story is brought to you in part by: New Hampshire Humanities Council, Norwin S. and Elizabeth N. Bean Foundation, The Gertrude Couch Trust

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New Hampshire's Immigration Story
1:12 pm
Fri May 25, 2012

Teaching Refugee Students: Challenges and Rewards

As part of our year-long series on New Hampshire's Immigration Story, we've looked at what it's like for a refugee to arrive in New Hampshire, speaking a different language, and having to learn new customs.

For young refugees who enroll in New Hampshire schools, the challenges can be even greater - and the same goes for teachers working with them.

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The Exchange
1:04 pm
Thu May 24, 2012

New Hampshire's Immigration Story: What We've Learned

J. Stephen Conn via Flickr Creative Commons

We conclude our series on New Hampshire’s Immigration Story.  Over the past year, we’ve examined our immigrant past -- from that first encounter between Native Americans and Europeans to how newcomers shape our communities today… their contributions, their struggles, and the conflicts that come up.  We’ll look at what we’ve learned…and how our immigration story is still being written.

Guests:

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The Exchange
9:00 am
Thu May 24, 2012

Socrates Exchange: Who is American?

Host Laura Knoy and Max Latona, Associate Professor of Philosophy at St. Anselm College, lead the Socrates Exchange discussion live in studio D at NHPR.
NHPR

Our series on New Hampshire’s Immigration Story continues with a special Socrates Exchange, examining the question: Who is American?  Is it simply a matter of birthright, and legal status?  Or is it a state of mind, a certain spirit or attitude?  And is being American defined by the way I view myself or how others look at me?  

We invite your thoughts: please call during our live broadcast at 1-800-892-6477. The conversation will continue after the program at our Socrates Exchange page.

Guests:

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NH News
8:00 am
Thu May 24, 2012

New Hampshire's Immigration Story - The Anti-Russian Revolution

 World War One was great for New Hampshire’s immigrant workforce, the mills were booming and jobs were plentiful.  But as thousands of American returned home from war, there was a growing distrust of the immigrant in general and of Russians in particular.

unemployment is high In 1919, there was something like 3600 strikes in America. So we’re looking for a scapegoat. 

New Hampshire Historian, Stu Wallace

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The Exchange
12:37 pm
Wed May 23, 2012

New Hampshire's Immigration Story: Culture Clashes

jozecuervo via Flickr Creative Commons

Every group that has arrived here has experienced some conflict – whether between newcomers and long-time residents…or, within new immigrant groups themselves.  As part of our series on New Hampshire’s Immigration Story, we’ll look at what difficulties tend to come up, again and again – also, how different people draw the lines between assimilation and maintaining their culture. 

 

Guests: 

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NH News
6:00 am
Wed May 23, 2012

New Hampshire's Immigration Story - Come to Amoskeag!

Weave Room, No. 11 Mill, Amoskeag Manufacturing Company, Manchester, NH; from a c. 1910 postcard.
Photo: Weave room Wikimedia Commons

By the early 1900's, the Amoskeag mill was earning its reputation as the textile capital of the world. There may have been other cities that produced more cloth, but none had a mill that compared to Manchester’s.

No other single textile factory in the world had 17,000 workers, and it had around 30 buildings at one time and it was turning out cloth 50 miles per hour.

Robert Perrault is a Manchester based historian and author of the book "Vivre la Difference: Franco-American Life and Culture in Manchester, New Hampshire”

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NH News
5:31 pm
Tue May 22, 2012

Refugees Start Fresh on the Farm

Anthony Munene, Farm Instructor
Todd Bookman/NHPR

As a farmer in Bhutan, Laxmi Narayan Mishre provided food and stability for his family.

But when ethnic tensions flared in the small Himalayan country, his land was seized.

With his wife and ten children, Mishre would spend the next two decades living in a cramped refugee camp in neighboring Nepal. Rumors swirled about a possible resettlement to America, and what life would be like here.

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Arts & Culture
8:00 am
Tue May 22, 2012

New Hampshire's Immigration Story - La Survivance and the Franco Americans

Monsignor Pierre Hevey

(Robert Perreault talking to his granddaughter)

As first generation French Canadian mill workers turned to second and third generation, Franco Americans outnumbered all immigrant groups in New Hampshire. And their presence is felt today.  Even though it was Robert Perreault’s grandfather that emigrated from French Canada, he still carry’s on many of his culture’s traditions. He speaks fluent French and so does his son. Now, they’re passing that tradition to his granddaughter.

(Sound of playing)

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N.H.'s Immigration Story
2:41 am
Tue May 22, 2012

N.H. Refugee Resettlement By The Numbers: 1997 - 2010

N.H.'s Immigration Story
12:00 am
Tue May 22, 2012

New Hampshire's Immigration Story

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