Regional News

News from everywhere *but* Central New Hampshire.

Britta Greene / NHPR

Inside Daddypops Tumble Inn Diner in Claremont, the owner’s daughter – Fallon Carter – is working behind the counter as she talks with her mom and a friend.

They’re discussing a recent incident in town that’s been all over the news. The family of a young biracial boy says local teenagers intentionally hanged their son in a lynching-style attack. He survived, but had to be airlifted to the hospital.

Britta Greene / NHPR

The parents of a teenager involved in the alleged attack of a young boy in Claremont say the incident was an accident, and was not racially motivated.

Their son was just joking around, they told Newsweek in an interview. He saw the boy standing on the picnic table and thought he'd scare him from behind, they said. He did not know there was a rope around the boy's neck. The kids had been playing with the rope and climbing trees, the parents explained.

Robert Wilson/flickr

A bid to bring the pumpkin festival back to Keene prevailed Thursday night after an unexpected last minute challenge from local officials.

Keene's mayor cast a tie-breaking vote at the city council meeting to allow the event to go forward.

In the past, the festival has broken world records for the most lit jack-o-lanterns in one place. But it was canceled in 2014 after riots broke out. Now. organizers are planning a much smaller, kid-focused festival.

NH Community Seafood

Last May, we reported on New Hampshire Community Seafood's effort to sign on at least 1,000 people for their community supported fishery, or CSF. A CSF is like a farm share, where subscribers can pick up seafood at various locations throughout the season. 

The push for new members was driven by a desire to support New Hampshire's ground fishermen. Their deadline was the end of summer, and with that now upon us, Andrea Tomlinson, manager of New Hampshire Community Seafood, joins NHPR's Peter Biello with an update.

Listen to their conversation right here:

New Hampshire State Police

A 19-year-old mystery may have been solved Tuesday when authorities pulled a pickup truck out of the Androscoggin River containing what are believed to be the remains of Tony Imondi. The truck was discovered in the river a few miles south of Errol Village.

This story originally appeared in The Berlin Daily Sun.

The Oyster River School District will be requiring diversity training for all staff in the wake of an alleged racist bullying incident earlier this month.

Superintendent Jim Morse says the trainings will be led by a member of the state health department who specializes in racial minority affairs. Morse says the training will be required for every district employee, including himself.

www.visitnhcolleges.com

The former president of Keene State College, Anne Huot, received a severance payout of more than $300,000 after stepping down earlier this year.

The University System of New Hampshire said Huot would take a year of unpaid leave when it announced her resignation in June. But she received a $327,225 severance payment following her resignation.

The college has recently struggled to contain its deficit. Officials say low enrollment is largely to blame. Todd Leach, chancellor of the state university system, was unavailable Thursday to comment on the severance agreement.

Britta Greene / NHPR

Over the next several months, the Claremont schools will take a closer look at issues of discrimination and bullying in the district. This comes after an alleged racially motivated attack of a young boy in town by local teenagers.

Wikimedia Commons

Phillips Exeter Academy and the Exeter Police Department have announced a new agreement concerning the reporting of sexual assaults on campus.

A new memorandum of understanding between the prestigious prep school and the local police department outlines procedures they say will help keep students safe from abuse of all kinds.

Downtown Portsmouth.
Squirrel Flight via Flickr/Creative Commons: http://www.flickr.com/photos/squirrelflight/1355544138/in/photostream/

The Portsmouth City Council has banned the use of what it calls ‘synthetic toxic pesticides’ in public spaces, citing concerns about public health.

The new policy is largely aimed at weed killing chemicals the city sprays on sidewalks and streets.

Portsmouth city councilor Jim Splaine put forward the motion, which was approved Monday night.

“We may be tonight adopting New Hampshire’s first very clear and strong position against synthetic toxic pesticides. This is a step in the right direction.”

Jason Moon for NHPR

Volunteers with the New Hampshire Beach Monitoring program are taking measurements of the state's beaches ahead of Hurricane Jose.

As volunteer Sherri Townsend explains, scientists want to know how the storm will impact the topography of the beach.

"We're just measuring if there's any changes in where the berm is, and how high the berm is, and the slope of the berm -- which is the high point, when the storm surge comes up."

The Durham Town Council voted Monday night to create a holiday called Indigenous Peoples’ Day.

After lots of public comment and a spirited debate, the Durham town council voted 7-2 to establish the new local holiday. It will be celebrated annually on the same day as Columbus Day.

Durham Town Councilor Kenny Rotner voted in favor of the resolution. He argued the move will have no legal effect on Columbus Day, which is a federal holiday.

Dartmouth’s Hopkins Center for the Arts staged two shows last weekend of “Antigone in Ferguson.” The play draws connections between the ancient Greek tragedy and the 2014 shooting of Michael Brown.

Conversation after the show touched on recent events just south of Hanover, in Claremont. The family of a young boy there alleges a group of local teenagers attempted to hang the child by a rope in a racially motivated attack. They say he nearly died.

Cori Princell

The 42nd New Hampshire Highland Games took place this weekend in Lincoln.  It’s one of the largest gatherings like it in the U.S.  NHPR’s Cori Princell attended with her family...and something of a unique perspective.  


Jason Moon for NHPR

The town of Hampton is taking the state to court. Officials there want the town reimbursed for services it provides at the state owned beach.

Local and state officials have long disagreed about exactly who is responsible for what at Hampton Beach, which is in the town of Hampton but owned and operated by the state.

George Grantham Bain Collection/Library of Congress

This weekend, the music of composer Amy Beach will echo throughout UNH’s campus during a two-day event timed to celebrate her 150th birthday.

Beach, who was born in Henniker in 1867, is often referred to as ‘the Dean of American Women Composers.’ At a time when women were often limited to writing parlor songs and other light fare, UNH Professor Peggy Vagts says Beach was a trailblazer, composing complicated, bold music.

“She took on really major works. She wrote a mass, wrote a symphony. She was the first American woman to do that,” says Vagts.

xlibber / Flickr Creative Commons

Electric vehicle enthusiasts are gathering around New Hampshire this weekend for National Drive Electric Week.

Paige Sutherland/NHPR

There’s an aldermen race going on next week in Manchester. And one of the candidates on the ballot would be the city’s youngest elected if he wins.

He turned 20 Thursday, attends UNH Manchester, and is a refugee from Kuwait.

But first he’ll have to clear Tuesday’s primary before he can even make it onto November’s ballot.

A group of New Hampshire residents and sportsmen’s organizations is suing the Department of Environmental Services over boat access on Lake Sunapee.

The suit comes after Gov. Chris Sununu pulled the plug earlier this year on a decades-long plan for boat access at what’s known as the Wild Goose site on the lake’s southern shore. He did so by choosing to not renew a wetlands permit for the site.

The complaint, filed in Sullivan County Superior Court, argues that DES, not the governor, has the authority to decide on that permit.

A new report says the Portsmouth Naval Shipyard is in poor condition and unable to keep up with the demands of the Navy.

The report comes from the legislative watchdog agency, the Government Accountability Office. It paints a bleak picture of the nation’s four public naval shipyards, including the Portsmouth Naval Shipyard.

It says the aging facilities together have racked up deferred maintenance costs of almost 5 billion dollars.

Valley News - Jennifer Hauck, Pool

Dartmouth-Hitchcock officials say they’re reviewing all safety procedures following the fatal shooting of a 70-year-old patient Tuesday.

Speaking outside the hospital's administrative offices Wednesday afternoon, Chief Clinical Officer Ed Merrens said a swift response from staff and law enforcement allowed for minimal patient disruption. “We had a full day yesterday. We had a busy OR, birthing pavilion, medical units -- everything was going,” he said. “Even in our surgical intensive care unit, we had patients taken care of.”

Paige Sutherland/NHPR

After hours of debate and public testimony, the Nashua Board of Alderman late last Tuesday rejected a proposal to build a performing arts center in downtown.

www.visitnhcolleges.com

Keene State College is looking to cut costs as the school year kicks off. The college was expecting to run a deficit this year, but revenue is down even more than anticipated due to low student enrollment.

Administrators are looking for areas where spending can be tightened without affecting student experience. Todd Leach, chancellor of the University System of New Hampshire, said low enrollment isn't just a challenge for Keene State. “Every college in New England really has to be making some adjustments for changing demographics,” he said.

DHMC

 

A man shot and killed his mother at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center in Lebanon on Tuesday, New Hampshire Attorney General Gordon MacDonald said.

Gov. Chris Sununu has asked the state Attorney General's office to help police in Claremont with the investigation of an alleged attack against a biracial boy in the city, according to a statement released by the governor's office Tuesday. 

The city of Keene will hold a public forum on drug and alcohol abuse Tuesday, stemming from a July Facebook post shared widely among city residents. The post included a photo of a man slumped over on a park bench downtown in broad daylight.

FILE

On Tuesday, Nashua's Board of Aldermen will decide the fate of a $15.5 million proposal to build a performing arts center on Main Street.

The proposal calls for a 500 to 700 seat theater and event center. The project has been in the works for years and has received strong backing from many downtown businesses, the Chamber of Commerce and Nashua Community College.

There’s also a petition going around with more than 500 online signatures. But some aldermen have reservations with the project's cost.

FILE

Southern New Hampshire University will soon open a new center to help refugees and immigrants in Manchester further their educations.

Jeff Dell/Flickr / https://flic.kr/p/5wMPqa

The Keene City Council voted unanimously last week to put the permit for this year’s Pumpkin Festival on hold.

Organizers are planning for a scaled-down festival compared to previous years. But councilors are now expressing concern that they could see a repeat of the riots that broke out in 2014.

NHPR’s Morning Edition Host Rick Ganley spoke with Councilor Janis Manwaring by phone on Monday.

The council granted a license for the festival back in June. What has changed since then?

Courtesy of Francestown Village Store

Earlier this summer, news broke that the Francestown Village Store, a 203-year old institution in that small Monadnock town, would be closing. The story made headlines in New Hampshire, but also caught the eye of the Wall Street Journal.

It turns out all that publicity may help save the store.

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