Regional News

News from everywhere *but* Central New Hampshire.

C. Hanchey via Flickr CC.

The city of Nashua will now offer full-day kindergarten at all of its elementary schools. That decision comes as lawmakers in Concord decide whether to support full-day kindergarten state-wide.

Nashua joins the roughly three quarters of school districts around the state that offer full-day kindergarten programs.

Districts who offer full-day programs, do so without support from the state.

But interim superintendent of Nashua Schools Connie Brown says with an overall decline in enrollment, they will be able to implement the program at no cost.

Britta Greene / NHPR

AVA - a Lebanon-based art gallery, studio and educational space - will celebrate the official dedication of a new sculpture center on Thursday.

 

The center houses studio space for woodworking, metal and glass forging, welding, and other three-dimensional art forms AVA has been unable to offer in its existing facilities.

 

jdurham / Morguefile

River Valley Community College, based in Claremont, is launching two new programs in computer science and information technology. The move is an attempt by the college to better tailor its offerings to the needs of local employers. 

"There are actually companies that are very, very concerned about not finding the right talent in the state," said Ali Rafieymehr, interim president and vice president of academic affairs at RVCC.

Michael Brindley/NHPR

The fifth and final "Welcome Home" ceremony for Vietnam Veterans will take place Saturday in Hudson. The event is hosted by the New Hampshire National Guard. 

When troops came back from fighting in Vietnam, they weren't universally welcomed. In some cases, they were actually scorned by those who opposed the war.

Now, however, Vietnam veterans are more widely recognized as having served their country honorably. More than a third of New Hampshire's veterans served during the Vietnam era.

Todd Bookman/NHPR

Members of the public were given their latest chance to weigh in on Northern Pass, a proposed utility transmission project that would bring hydropower from Quebec to Southern New England via New Hampshire.

Britta Greene / NHPR

What’s notable about Margie Emmons' kayak tours is not necessarily what you can see on the tour, it’s what you can’t.

 

On a recent morning, Emmons led a small group of women on a tour of the Moore Reservoir, just west of Littleton, New Hampshire. Two towns - one on the Vermont side and one in New Hampshire - used to stand in this spot. The remains of both flooded after New England Power built the Moore Dam in the 1950s.

 

Courtesy of Dartmouth-Hitchcock

Joanne Conroy, a hospital executive in Burlington, Mass., will be the next CEO and president of Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center. Conroy will take over the role in August after the departure of James Weinstein.  

Dartmouth-Hitchcock is the state's largest health system, with about 12,000 employees and 24 clinics in New Hampshire and Vermont. Conroy, an anesthesiologist, will be the first woman to lead the Lebanon-based system.

Britta Greene / NHPR

Four panelists -- three of them veterans -- answered questions about their personal experiences navigating gender and sexuality issues at a public discussion at the Veterans Affairs Medical Center in White River Junction, Vermont on Wednesday.

The event was part of a broader effort by the VA to let veterans know they can be honest about their gender and sexuality and still access medical care within the VA system.

Via USGS.gov

The city of Portsmouth and the town of Greenland are asking the state to help pay for public water at homes whose private wells may be at risk of water contamination.

Residents living near the Coakley Landfill in Greenland fear their private wells are drawing contaminated water from the superfund site which received municipal and industrial waste in the 70s and 80s.

Officials in Greenland had previously asked Portsmouth, which operates the only public well in Greenland, to extend water lines to about 300 homes near the landfill.

Jeannette S. / Flicker CC

Bears have been a major headache in Hanover this spring. One mother bear and her three yearlings, in particular, became well known to residents for their aggressive behavior. The animals are attracted to unsecured dumpsters and residential garbage cans.

Britta Greene / NHPR

CNN anchor Jake Tapper reflected on his career in journalism in a commencement address to graduates of Dartmouth College Sunday.

Tapper has been in the spotlight recently for his pointed, and at times combative, back-and-forths with members of the Trump administration. But he said his 2012 book detailing a deadly battle in Afghanistan remains his proudest accomplishment.

Wikimedia Commons

Three seniors at an elite New Hampshire prep school have been expelled days before graduation for tampering with an election for student council president.

The Portsmouth Herald reports Phillips Exeter Academy expelled the students June 2 following an investigation by the school's discipline committee.

A spokeswoman said the academy was presented with evidence that fraudulent ballots had been filled out and counted in the results of the April 25 election. She says the school is working with council and faculty advisers to determine how best to address the election results.

Portsmouth’s Market Square Day takes place Saturday. It’s the annual event’s 40th year.

The festival kicks off with a 10k road race at 9am and continues with street vendors and live music until 4pm.

It’s hosted by the non-profit group Pro Portsmouth. Barbara Massar is Executive Director.

“Altogether we probably accepted 170 vendors this year. So if you stand in Market Square and look in four directions, you’re going to see –beyond a sea of people—you’re going to see rows and rows of tents.”

Britta Greene / NHPR

The Lebanon City Council voted Wednesday to amend the city's master plan, removing references to natural gas as a favored energy source. The move is largely symbolic, but it reflects growing concern around the environmental impact of natural gas.

Residents in the Upper Valley are organizing to fight a proposal by Liberty Utilities for a new natural gas facility and pipeline running through Lebanon and Hanover. The state Public Utilities Commission is slated to hear that proposal in September.

Saratoga Associates

Opponents of a small proposed wind farm in Antrim are asking the state's highest court to rule on the project.

Their appeal marks the latest development in a years-long fight between the project's backers and various opponents, including local residents and conservation groups.

The New Hampshire Site Evaluation Committee gave the project a green light about six months ago, and construction was expected to start in the fall.

NHPR Staff

Dartmouth College is reaffirming its commitment to reducing greenhouse gas emissions following President Donald Trump's decision to pull out from the Paris climate agreement. 

On Monday, Dartmouth President Phil Hanlon joined the presidents of eleven other schools in signing a letter underlining a commitment to sustainability, including more quickly transitioning to low-carbon energy sources. 

Jim Richmond via Flickr Creative Commons

The federal agency that regulates the Seabrook Nuclear power plant is hosting a public meeting to discuss the plant’s 2016 record in safety.

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission will host the public meeting Wednesday night in Hampton.

Reuters

Union employees and the Westinghouse Electric Company have reached an agreement to end a two-week long lockout at the company’s Newington facility.

Last month, members of the International Brother of Boilermakers and Westinghouse Electric found themselves at odds over renewal of a labor contract.

When negotiations broke down, the company locked the employees out of their Newington factory which manufactures parts for nuclear power plants.

Now, Miguel Fonseca with the Boilermakers says the union and the company have reached a compromise.

In the wake of President Donald Trump’s decision to pull the U.S. out of the Paris climate agreement, officials in the town of Durham are looking for ways to stay involved locally.

Living with Black Bears in Back Yards

Jun 5, 2017

The recent saga of the troublesome family of bears in Hanover, destined to be killed after they entered a home in search of food, is one of the latest examples of conflict between black bears and humans in New Hampshire.  Governor Chris Sununu intervened, and the three yearlings were captured and relocated to the north country, although the mother bear has yet to be located.  The Hanover human-bear conflict generated concern nationwide, with hundreds signing an online petition and flooding N.H. Fish & Game with calls.  Why did this conflict resonate with so many - and how do we continue to live with bears in New Hampshire?

 


Todd Bookman/NHPR

Commercial fishermen in Northern New England face their fair share of challenges. Along with declining fish stocks and tight catch regulations, the occupation also remains one of the most dangerous in the country.

With that ever-present risk in mind, dozens of fishermen turned out in New Castle, New Hampshire recently for a day-long safety training exercise.

Britta Greene for NHPR

The EPA has awarded $200,000 for the redevelopment of an old paper mill site along the Connecticut River.

Figuring out what to do with old mill buildings is an ongoing - and expensive - challenge for many New England towns. This site, the old Robertson Mill, actually sits on an island in the Connecticut River, right between New Hampshire and Bellows Falls, Vermont. You can hear the nearby falls from here on the property.

"It’s one of the old mill buildings that this town, really...a lot of this economy was built upon."

Charlene Music

The two places could not be more different: the Dartmouth College campus and the Sullivan County jailhouse. Yet, in a new documentary, college students from Dartmouth and female inmates worked together to write short plays about what it’s like to be incarcerated. The process generates a conversation about privilege and the justice system.

Seven years in the making, the film debuts this Saturday at the White River Indie Festival. NHPR’s Peter Biello spoke with the documentary’s director, Signe Taylor, about the making of the film.

Cori Princell

It's spring and farmers markets are opening around the state. In Berlin, a city that’s been through some tough economic changes, the summer farmers market has long been a bright spot of local food and community. But earlier this spring, it was looking like that farmers market might not be happening anymore.

Britta Greene / NHPR

About 50 people showed up for a public forum with the Lebanon Police Chief Richard Mello in West Lebanon Tuesday night.

Since the November election, residents have been approaching the mayor and city councilors with questions around immigration enforcement by local law enforcement, according to Councilor Karen Liot Hill. “A lot of people seem to be really concerned about what might happen -- not necessarily what was happening, but what might happen in the future,” she said.

The forum aimed to address some of those concerns. 

Flickr Creative Commons / Brave Sir Robin

The Director of the National Institute on Drug Abuse joined New Hampshire Rep. Annie Kuster in Hanover Tuesday afternoon. They spoke as part of a discussion on the opioid crisis hosted by Dartmouth College.

Kuster took advantage of the opportunity to criticize President Trump’s proposed cuts to Medicaid. “We all know the importance of access to treatment for addressing this crisis," she said. "I will continue to hold this administration accountable for their actions in addressing the opioid epidemic.”

 

Three juvenile bears in Hanover that were initially targeted to be destroyed have been trapped and relocated.

New Hampshire Fish & Game had said last week the three bears and their mother had to be killed, after two of the cubs entered a home. But Governor Chris Sununu then intervened, saying the bears should be released in a remote location.

Courtesy Sarah Lindberg

It’s been a week of high-stakes ups-and-downs for four bears living in the Hanover area. A home break-in, traps set, and in the end, a last-minute reprieve by the governor.   


Courtesy Sarah Lindberg

The State Fish and Game Department is being flooded with calls about four bears in the Hanover area. Officials recently decided to trap and kill the bears after two of the animals entered a home in town. 

Andrew Timmins heads the department’s bear program and says many people are calling from far away, wanting to save the animals.  

State officials have set traps for four bears in the Hanover area after two of the animals recently entered a home there. Once caught, the bears will be shot, according to Mark Ellingwood, Wildlife Division Chief for the New Hampshire Fish and Game Department.

Pages