The Seacoast Region

At 18 miles long, New Hampshire has the shortest shoreline in America.  But for centuries, this small strip of land has been the heart of the state’s Seacoast region.

The Seacoast is home to New Hampshire’s commercial fishing industry, and has been since the establishment of the first fishing colony in 1623.  But in recent decades, the area’s fishermen have struggled to maintain their foothold in the sector.  In Portsmouth, the Seacoast’s main city, the US Census Bureau found only 0.2 percent of residents work in the “Farming, fishing and forestry occupations” category.

Today, a significant portion of the Seacoast’s economy is tourism–based.  Portsmouth’s historic buildings and the draw of Hampton Beach, among other attractions, have allowed a number of small business owners to make their livings catering to visitors.

In addition to tourism, the Seacoast is home to a thriving professional sector.  A number of people are employed in the financial services and high-tech sectors. Compared to New Hampshire as a whole, the Census Bureau reports Portsmouth has a higher percentage of people working in management and professional roles.  Statewide, 37.5 percent of workers have these higher-dollar jobs, compared to 46.3 percent of Portsmouth residents.

Home values in Portsmouth also skew high.  There, 53.7 percent of owner-occupied homes are valued from $300 thousand to $999,999, while statewide, that accounts for only 35.2 percent of homes.  The portion of Portsmouth homes valued at $1 million or more is also double the figure for all of New Hampshire.

Despite this comparative prosperity, the Seacoast struggles in some areas.  Most notably, there are a number of environmental issues surrounding declining water quality in the area’s vital Great Bay Estuary.  These problems could prove costly to fix in the short-term, and have the potential to harm the Seacoast’s economy in the long-term.

Summary provided by StateImpact NH

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NH News
4:46 pm
Tue March 4, 2014

Lead And Asbestos-Ridden 'Alcatraz Of The East' For Lease At Portsmouth Naval Shipyard

Credit rjzii via Flickr Creative Commons

The US Navy will offer for lease the former Naval Prison on the Portsmouth Naval Shipyard.

The Navy has twice before sought private-sector redevelopment of the old Naval Prison, which closed in 1974.  It was built in 1908, and has been called the “Alcatraz of the East.”

The medieval-looking multi-story building is 265,000 square feet and has 11 and a half acres of waterfront land.

The new tenant would be responsible for ensuring structural stability in the now-dilapidated building, and cleaning up hazardous waste, including asbestos and lead paint.

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Giving Matters
12:14 am
Sat February 1, 2014

Children Learn To Be Good Stewards Of The Great Bay

Great Bay Discovery Center in Greenland, N.H.
Cheryl Senter

The Great Bay Stewards work to preserve and protect the Great Bay estuary through education, land protection and research. Sharon Musselman, one of the educators, is recently a retired teacher who often brought her own classes here to explore this ecosystem.

"I'm excited to be here at Great Bay Discover center," Musselman said. "I brought my first grade class to Great Bay for 15 years because it is such a great experience for first graders."

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NH News
5:00 am
Tue January 7, 2014

Increasing Fees Could Ease Parking Problems

Credit Emily Corwin / NHPR

Portsmouth planners say in the next six years, the city will need at least 650 more parking spaces But last year, a new parking lot championed by the then-mayor failed to gather support among city councilors. The future of parking in the city became a divisive issue in last November’s council election.

On Monday, the newly elected council took the oath of office.  It's likely this month they will begin trying to reach agreement once again on whether a new parking garage downtown will help or harm the future of Portsmouth.

 

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Giving Matters
12:00 am
Sat January 4, 2014

Portsmouth African Burying Ground Commemorates Past

African Burying Ground NH

During the 1700's, many Portsmouth residents were of African descent– some slave, some free— and were buried in a segregated cemetery. That cemetery was built over, its boundaries obscured. A public works crew rediscovered the site and now the restoration of its dignity has begun. Kelvin Edwards is working on the Portsmouth African Burying Ground Memorial.

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NH News
12:59 pm
Fri January 3, 2014

Extreme Cold, Harsh Weather Take Toll On Memorial Bridge Lift

Credit Rik Koenig, via Flickr creative commons

Crews are inspecting the Memorial Bridge today after it had to be closed for a little more than an hour last night.

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NH News
3:34 pm
Thu December 5, 2013

NH Man Who Killed Parents Earns Conditional Parole

A 31-year-old New Hampshire man who has spent more than half his life in prison for killing his parents when he was 14 can be freed if he completes counseling and learns the skills he'll need to return to society.

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NH News
7:40 pm
Sun December 1, 2013

Seabrook Owners, Union Reach Deal To Avert Lockout

Credit Jim Richmond via Flickr Creative Commons

 

The owners of the Seabrook Station nuclear power plant and the union representing 226 workers there have reached a contract agreement to avert a lockout.

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NH News
2:16 pm
Sun November 17, 2013

Portsmouth Police Arrest Ninth Suspect In Alleged Heroin Ring

Portsmouth police say they've made a ninth arrest in connection with a months-long heroin ring investigation.  The ninth suspect--21-year old Chelsea Glover of Milton--was arrested Friday night on charges of selling heroin. She was being held on $5,000 bail.   Seven other people have been charged with felony-level drug offenses. One was charged with misdemeanor trespassing.

NH News
2:10 pm
Sun November 17, 2013

Barge Sinks Off Portsmouth Harbor

The Coast Guard says salvage operations are continuing following the sinking of a barge off Portsmouth Harbor.  Officials say on one was hurt when the 40-foot work barge equipped with a crane began taking on water Saturday east of the harbor. The only person board, the barge operator, was able to escape.   It was unclear why the barge began taking on water.   The Coast Guard said Sunday that divers confirmed that all fuel tanks were intact.        

Foodstuffs
5:34 pm
Thu November 7, 2013

What Portsmouth's Chefs Learned From The Man Who Made It A Food Hotspot

Credit Squirrel Flight via Flickr/Creative Commons: http://www.flickr.com/photos/squirrelflight/1355544138/in/photostream/

Portsmouth has long been considered one of the state’s food hotspots, and with Restaurant Week Portsmouth getting underway, we thought it was a good time to check in on Portsmouth’s food scene - a scene that got a huge boost in the 1970's from a chef called James Haller, who founded the Blue Strawbery restaurant.

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NH News
8:25 pm
Wed November 6, 2013

OSHA Fines Hampton Textile Firm For Safety Violations

The Hampton textile  firm Foss Manufacturing Company is facing $115,000 in fines, according to the state’s Department of Labor.

That’s after a federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration investigation discovered 21 safety hazards, following an employee complaint. 

Investigators found a substantive probability of injury or death from electrocution, burns, and amputation injuries, as well as confinement in oxygen-deficient spaces.

NH News
12:01 am
Wed October 9, 2013

Dean of UNH Business School Announces Congressional Run

Republican Dan Innis, dean of the University of New Hampshire's business school, is running for Congress in the state's First District.

Innis, who also owns a Portsmouth inn with his husband, announced his campaign via an online video Wednesday. Though he's never run for office, he tells The Associated Press that the national situation is so dire with the growing deficit, national debt and Washington gridlock, that he's determined to do something about it. He says too many members of Congress let Washington change them instead of the reverse.

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