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The Bookshelf is NHPR's series on authors and books with ties to the Granite State.  All Things Considered host Peter Biello features authors, covers literary events and publishing trends, and gets recommendations from each guest on what books listeners might want to add to their own bookshelves. 

If you have an author or book you think we should profile on The Bookshelf, send us an email. The address is books@nhpr.org.

Happy Friday! Here's some interesting stuff you might've missed this week. Want to catch up a bit earlier on the headlines? Sign up for our Friday news email, The Rundown, and get it delivered right to your inbox. Here's the link.

Friendly reminder: (Still? Only?) 137 days ‘til the state primaries

And if this week’s any indication, it’s not going to be pretty.

Dank Depot via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/9c93J6

It’s official: Nearly three years after the state legalized medical marijuana, New Hampshire’s first dispensary will start serving patients Saturday morning in Plymouth.

Outside/In: On the Hunt

7 hours ago
Greta Rybus and Logan Shannon

Ever since becoming a reporter, Sam has heard stories about a secret hunting reserve in New Hampshire, stocked with elk and 200-pound wild boar.  It's the size of a medium-sized town, but most people have never even heard about it, and almost nobody wants to talk about it.

Matt Ward via Flickr (https://flic.kr/p/7BuupJ)

Is there a song that has stuck with you for years?  Maybe a tune your parents sang to you as a child, the notes imprinted on your mind and became a part of your being.  As Chris and Dave shared the melodies imparted to themselves, the conversation turned (as it often does) to birds.  Is our musical learning similar to that of our avian neighbors?

American Red Cross

Red Cross officials say the need for volunteers across New Hampshire and Vermont is critical, and they're holding a "disaster bootcamp" in the North Country to train new recruits. 

EPA Superfund Records Collections

The federal Environmental Protection Agency has agreed to test water for possible PFC contamination near the Coakley landfill in southeast New Hampshire.

The Portsmouth Herald reports Gov. Maggie Hassan said it's her understanding that the EPA has committed to testing areas around the landfill in Rye and North Hampton and is finalizing a plan for such testing.

Sean Hurley

For some, the end of winter conjures thoughts of swimming at the lake or working in the garden.  For others, the warm weather means it’s time to put fresh batteries in the metal detector.  

Retired firefighter Mike Cogan from Long Island hoists a metal detector over his shoulder and heads down the dirt road with 40 other metal detecting enthusiasts from around the country.

“Heigh ho, heigh ho, it’s off to work we go…” Cogan sings.

This is the third day of B.O.N.E. 23, the largest metal detecting meet-up in New Hampshire, and this morning, with the property owner’s permission, the group is scanning a five acre field in Alstead.

Flickr

After much debate, the New Hampshire Senate Thursday voted to keep the state’s so-called drug forfeiture fund alive.

Under current law money or assets seized in a criminal drug bust are put into a special fund used to combat future drug crimes. 

BRIAN WALLSTIN FOR NHPR

A bill seeking to legalize Keno in New Hampshire fell flat once again in the state Senate.

Lawmakers voted 13 to 10 to kill the proposal which would have allowed Keno, a form of electronic bingo, in places with liquor licenses, but only after individual approval from cities and towns. 

Senator Jerry Little of Weare said Keno would mean money for the state - $8 to $9 million a year he calculated.

Republican Congressman Frank Guinta is facing a fresh obstacle in his quest to keep his seat: The formation of an outside money group to back one of his rivals.

Republican businessman Rich Ashooh is the benefactor of a newly formed super PAC, which can raise unlimited sums of money from individuals. The group's financial backers aren't yet known, but Matt Mowers, a former executive director of the state GOP, is helping run it.

Dover School District

Next week, hearings begin in a lawsuit brought by the city of Dover that challenges how the state pays for public schools. It’s the latest in a long line of high-profile cases that has put the branches of New Hampshire’s government at odds. NHPR’s Jason Moon talked with Morning Edition host Rick Ganley about the case and how it fits into that history is .

Chris Jensen for NHPR

Running a restaurant is a risky business. Many owners don’t figure out all the angles and are out of business the first year or so. But in the North Country, the family that owns Grandma’s Kitchen figured it out more than 30 years ago.

Dennis Streeter and his wife, Linda, have owned Grandma’s Kitchen since 1994.

Linda’s parents owned it for a decade before that.

As a kid, Dennis used to buy ice cream cones here.

So, the couple understands what works in Whitefield and the North Country.

Sam Evans-Brown for NHPR

The fire chief in Stoddard, New Hampshire, says he's implementing a plan to prevent future employees from committing arson after the recent arrest of a volunteer firefighter.

Chief Stephen McGerty said Wednesday that David Plante has been suspended from the Stoddard Fire and Rescue Department. Plante, who is charged with two counts of arson, is accused of setting two fires that burned hundreds of acres, forced the evacuation of 17 homes and caused $500,000 worth of damage to utility equipment.

Courtesy Image

Developers have applied for variances to construct a 38-unit "age-targeted" residential complex for seniors along the U.S. Route 1 Bypass in Portsmouth.

The Portsmouth Herald reports Stonegate NH Construction LLC has asked the city's Board of Adjustment for permission to build the senior housing on the site of a former medical office building on Route 1 Bypass North.

A new study from the UNH Carsey School of Public Policy says towns in the Great Bay watershed stand to save a lot of money if they can coordinate their efforts at reducing the amount of nitrogen entering the bay.

Communities in the Great Bay watershed have been tasked with lowering the amount of nitrogen entering the bay by federal and state regulators for years now.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

The New Hampshire Senate today will once again tackle a handful of bills geared at the state’s opioid crisis. Many of the proposals being related to illegal drug use.

Pool photo: Elizabeth Franz | Monitor staff

Prosecutors in the case of a former St. Paul’s School student convicted of rape are seeking to remove Owen Labrie’s lawyer from his request for a new trial.  

This presidential campaign season has provided plenty of fodder for satire. Two men from Keene—Blake Amacker and Stephen Polzwartek—have decided to satirize it with a board game. It’s called "Trunks ‘n Asses," and fans of Cards Against Humanity may find a lot to like in this game. They’re raising money to mass-produce the game on Kickstarter. They spoke with NHPR’s All Things Considered host Peter Biello about the game.

A 26-year-old Portsmouth woman was sentenced to serve between eight and 20 years in prison for selling the fatal dose of drugs that caused a Maine man to overdose in 2015.

NH1.com reports Amanda Burgess was sentenced Tuesday after reaching an agreement with prosecutors to plead guilty to charges of supplying fentanyl with death resulting.

Prosecutors say Burgess sold a $40 dose of the synthetic opiate to 27-year-old Joseph Cahill, who was found dead on June 15, 2015. Burgess, a known heroin dealer, fled New Hampshire after the York, Maine man died.

There is no evidence that the death of 18-year-old Emily Clogston from Warren was anything but a no-fault accident, an investigation has concluded.

The accident happened last July in Lisbon as Troop F Commander Todd Landry was heading home with his wife and daughter after getting ice cream, according to the report released Tuesday by Sullivan County Attorney Marc Hathaway.

Chris Jensen for NHPR

Citing strong state revenue numbers, Governor Maggie Hassan is calling on Republican leaders to act on a number of spending priorities. But top Republicans say much of what the governor seeks is already in the works.

fellowdesigns / Morguefile

Next time you’re heading through Hooksett, N.H. on I-93, look for a Tesla electric car stopped at one of the dozen charging stations. Chances are, you won’t find a Tesla or any other kind of electric vehicle there. These stations are not used very often. David Brooks, reporter for The Concord Monitor and writer at Granitegeek.org, spoke with NHPR’s All Things Considered host Peter Biello about why these charging stations are so infrequently used.

A January count shows roughly 1,300 individuals were homeless in New Hampshire — the lowest number in the past five years.

The numbers come from an annual, one-day count of homeless individuals. Fewer people were in shelters on the day of the count than last year. The report also shows 26 percent fewer people were temporarily living with friends or family compared to last year.

The Coos Planning Board meets Tuesday night in Lancaster to consider a plan to greatly expand the ski area at the Balsams, including a proposal to clear some high-elevation forest.

The multi-year plan would expand the skiing area from 135 to almost 1,100 acres, with possibly 800 more acres of glade skiing.

Developer Les Otten says the pace would depend on “market conditions," but he would like to begin some clearing this summer.

Casey McDermott, NHPR

This Saturday marked what’s believed to be the 400th anniversary of William Shakespeare’s death.

But it was also thought to have been his 452nd birthday — and over at Saint Anselm College, a group of students, professors and others turned out to honor the playwright and poet in the best way possible, with a daylong reading of his work. (There was also, of course, plenty of birthday cake.)

The strange and bitter Democratic primary in the first congressional district got even stranger and more bitter today.

s_falkow via Flickr Creative Commons

U.S. Attorney Emily Gray Rice and New Hampshire’s Attorney General, Joe Foster, will work together to prosecute drug overdoses as crime scenes. The goal is to charge drug dealers with homicide, when an overdose death can be linked to a drug sale. 

The collaboration will expand resources for state prosecutors and allow New Hampshire drug dealers to be charged under federal law, which has tougher penalties for drug crimes.

Paige Sutherland/NHPR

New Hampshire’s drug crisis is a common topic on the campaign trail this year. But U.S. Senate candidate Jim Rubens is touting a slightly different approach.

Rubens advocates for so-called "harm reduction" policies, things like drug assisted treatment, needle exchange programs, and the decriminalization of marijuana.

warriorwoman531 via Flickr Creative Commons

A volunteer firefighter charged with arson in connection with a brush fire that burned 190 acres in New Hampshire and prompted the evacuation of 17 homes is due to make his first court appearance. 

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