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Courtesy Sarah Lindberg

It’s been a week of high-stakes ups-and-downs for four bears living in the Hanover area. A home break-in, traps set, and in the end, a last-minute reprieve by the governor.   


Every other year, the organization Building On Hope rallies together hundreds of people to renovate a community organization's space. 

This time, the organization chose Crisis Center of Central New Hampshire, in Concord. It’s an emergency shelter for domestic violence and other survivors of abuse. Board member E.J. Powers says the project is "In the spirit of yankee barn raisings from many generations ago."

He says builders, architects, painters, designers, and everyday people will volunteer their time, and sometimes, their money.

Peter Biello / NHPR

The Bookshelf from NHPR is New Hampshire Public Radio's series on authors and books with ties to the Granite State.  All Things Considered host Peter Biello features authors, covers literary events and publishing trends, and gets recommendations from each guest on what books listeners might want to add to their own bookshelves. If you have an author or book you think we should profile on The Bookshelf, send us an email. The address is books@nhpr.org.

Flkr Creative Commons / US Fish and Wildlife

Talk of turkey is usually relegated to the month of November as we stuff ourselves with eating yams and cranberry jelly, and watch college football. And the misperception about Ben Franklin proposing the wild turkey as our national bird, is usually not far behind.

  New Hampshire tourism officials are estimating that 625,000 people will visit the state and spend $100 million over the three-day Memorial Day holiday weekend.

That's a 4 percent increase in visitors and a 5 percent increase in visitor spending compared to a year ago.

Research shows scenic drives and outdoor recreation are the most prevalent Memorial Day weekend activities in the state, while shopping, attending commemorative events, college graduations, visiting friends and relatives, and rest and relaxation also are popular.

Dover Public Library

Piano lessons are often a great way for children to get introduced to music – but what about taking a piano apart?

That’s exactly what children at the Dover Public Library will be doing Saturday morning. It’s part of the library’s ongoing “take apart” program. The event is for children in grades 3 and up. 

Cathy Beaudoin is director of the Dover Public Library. She joined NHPR’s Morning Edition.

Weekly N.H. News Roundup: May 26, 2017

May 25, 2017

Senate Republicans are confident their state budget plan will clear the full Senate. A  full-day kindergarten proposal is tied to the lottery game KENO.  St. Paul’s School releases a report detailing allegations of sexual assault by faculty and staff decades ago. And Fish & Game Officials are flooded with calls to save trouble-making bears in Hanover.


Governor Chris Sununu thinks the state and Dartmouth-Hitchcock have cleared the air over their dispute about mental health staffing at New Hampshire hospital.

That was Sununu's take after a meeting Wednesday with Dartmouth-Hitchcock CEO Jim Weinstein.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Republican leaders in the Senate are confident the body will pass a GOP-backed version of the state budget next week.

But how the process will unfold after that is different than usual this year.

Ben Henry

At an Oyster River High School baseball game few weeks ago, junior Brennen Oxford took the mound. He didn’t know it, but he was about to throw a no-hitter.

At his next game, he did it again.

Then, to everyone’s great surprise, he threw two more no-hitters, which brought his streak up to four consecutive games. This remarkable show of talent earned Oxford a few headlines, including on Major League Baseball’s website.

Family court judges will soon be required to give priority to grandparents in guardianship cases where parents are dealing with substance abuse issues.

Gov. Chris Sununu signed a bill into law last week that’s meant to address the rise in grandparents taking on parental duties in the midst of the state’s heroin and opioid crisis.

The new law takes effect next year, and a public signing ceremony is expected soon.

Coast Guard Compass

Decades after President Nixon declared drugs "public enemy number one,"  the criminal justice system is still grappling with the problem.  In recent years, we've seen bipartisan calls for an end to so-called mass incarceration for drug crimes and a shift away from the so-called "war on drugs" toward greater emphasis on treatment for addiction.

As Acting U.S. Attorney John Farley sees it, the phrase "war on drugs" is a bit of a buzz term that oversimplifies a battle now being waged on two fronts.   

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

After weeks of going through the numbers, the Senate Finance Committee has wrapped up its version of the state’s next two-year budget.

The proposal passed the committee with a 4 to 2 vote Wednesday, with Democrats against.

State officials have set traps for four bears in the Hanover area after two of the animals recently entered a home there. Once caught, the bears will be shot, according to Mark Ellingwood, Wildlife Division Chief for the New Hampshire Fish and Game Department.

In recent months, there’s been something of a populist uprising in Lisbon, New Hampshire. Outsiders have been run out of town, while the local government faced a small-scale coup.

The question is: Why?

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

The House finance committee has given its unanimous backing to a full-day kindergarten proposal tied to the lottery game Keno.

Under the bill, the state would send school districts that have full-day kindergarten an extra $1100 per pupil starting in 2019.

The bill would also authorize cities and towns to allow Keno. The state's take from the video lottery game would be deposited in the state's education trust fund. The account the new Kindergarten aid would be drawn from. Neal Kurk is chairman of the House Finance Committee.

Ralph Alchinger via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/aAWEpD

More than a dozen female inmates in New Hampshire are learning how to transcribe textbooks and other materials into Braille as part of a jobs training program.

The New Hampshire Department of Corrections is teaming up with the state Department of Education and hopes to complete the training by the end of the year, when a new women's prison opens in Concord. Once they learn Braille transcription, the women will transcribe materials from the Department of Education and the American Printing House for the Blind.

The term “fake news” became part of the national lexicon leading up to last year’s presidential election.

But in the months since President Trump took office, there’s now been a flurry of liberal conspiracy theories being spread across social media.

This story has been updated to make note of the AP's correction to its original story, issued Wednesday.

Last week, the Associated Press — along with other local news outlets — covered Trump adviser Kellyanne Conway’s visit to New Hampshire to speak at party fundraiser.

The New Hampshire Republican Party took issue with the AP’s decision to report from inside the closed-press event, the accuracy of its brief story and the integrity of the reporter who filed it — and responded with a firestorm of criticism, on social media and elsewhere. 

NHPR Staff

Democrats picked up a seat in the New Hampshire House Tuesday, after pulling off an upset in the typically Republican stronghold town of Wolfeboro.

Democrat Edith DesMarais won a special election to replace Republican Harold Parker, who resigned to join Governor Chris Sununu's administration.

It was an unexpected victory, and one the state Democratic Party is touting as symbolic of a shift in the political tide.

Meanwhile, Republicans held on to a seat in another special election Tuesday in Hillsborough County.

Democrats Say Trump Budget Would Hurt New Hampshire

May 24, 2017
File Photo / NHPR

  Members of New Hampshire's Democratic congressional delegation say Republican President Donald Trump's budget would hurt the state in its fight against the opioid epidemic.

FILE

The Republican-controlled Senate Finance Committee backed a proposal on Tuesday to cut New Hampshire’s business taxes.

St. Paul's School

An investigation into sexual misconduct at St. Paul’s School in Concord has found substantiated claims of abuse involving 13 former faculty and staff. NHPR’s Peter Biello spoke with Cambridge attorney Eric MacLeish, who has experience litigating against institutions accused of sexually abusing children, and has been in touch with three alleged victims of sexual misconduct by St. Paul’s faculty and staff.

Paige Sutherland/NHPR

The state Medical Examiner’s Office has confirmed that the potent synthetic opiate Carfentanil has been involved in a total of six deaths in New Hampshire. 

Pool Photo|Associated Press

St. Paul’s School graduate Owen Labrie is asking the state’s highest court to review a New Hampshire law that requires him to register as a lifetime sex offender.

Labrie was convicted in 2015 of having sex with a fifteen year-old classmate while he was a student at the Concord prep school. The law at issue involves the use of a computer to lure a minor for sex.

Read the latest filings in the case right here.

Via co.cheshire.nh.us

The Cheshire County Delegation approved a 20-year, nearly $36 million bond Monday to fund renovations at Maplewood Nursing Home. 

 

Plans for the county-run facility have been under debate for about a decade. Maplewood aims to serve needy residents who may have no other options for care. 

 

Chevrolet

Electric vehicles are not quite mainstream yet, but the price of one model, the Chevy Bolt, is dropping to an accessible range. Concord Monitor columnist David Brooks was lucky enough to test drive one, and wrote this week that there’s a learning curve for driving these cars. He spoke with NHPR’s Peter Biello about the experience.

About that learning curve—what exactly would we have to unlearn as drivers in order to learn how to drive electric cars?

The New Hampshire Department of Education has unveiled a draft of its plan to comply with the federal Every Student Succeeds Act.

The Every Student Succeeds Act, or ESSA, was passed in 2015 as a replacement for No Child Left Behind.

Flickr Creative Commons / Brave Sir Robin

Dartmouth Professor N. Bruce Duthu has turned down the position of Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences following charges that he supported a boycott of Israeli academic institutions. 

Duthu, a professor of Native American Studies and an Associate Dean, was appointed earlier this spring to be the next Dean of the Faculty starting July 1.

NH Wildlife Journal

Why have there been so many search and rescue missions in New Hampshire’s great outdoors this year?  Not just hikers, but snowmobilers and ATV enthusiasts as well?  Fish and Game Executive director Glenn Normandeau gave his take on that question today on NHPR’s “The Exchange.”   

First off, Normandeau said, with an improved economy, there are simply more people out there, recreating.  But he also said – some of them just make poor choices.   

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