News

Ryan Lessard/NHPR

Amid the fanfare and rumbling antique cars of the Amherst Fourth of July parade, candidates for president greeted residents and posed for pictures. Four candidates in total walked the parade route.

Republicans South Carolina Senator Lindsey Graham and former Texas Governor Rick Perry jogged energetically from handshake to handshake, often joking with residents. Former Florida Governor Jeb Bush kept a steadier pace behind them.

Šarūnas Burdulis via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/a19Qn8

Getting ready to fire off some bottle rockets this Independence Day? You may want to check our map below first.

The SEE Science Center offers scientific explorations for all ages. Barnstead teacher Annie Bourque makes an annual trip with her 6th grade class to take advantage of the chemistry lab there. 

Eric Fleming

One of New Hampshire’s largest landlords, Brady Sullivan Properties, is under scrutiny from city, state and federal regulators for lead contamination in one of its buildings in Manchester. 

The Bookshelf: Short Story Writer Robin McLean

Jul 3, 2015
Robert McLean

The Bookshelf is NHPR's series on authors and books with ties to the Granite State. All Things Considered host Peter Biello interviews authors, covers literary events and publishing trends, and gets recommendations from each guest on what books listeners might want to add to their own bookshelves.

If you have an author or book you think we should profile on The Bookshelf, send us an email. The address is books@nhpr.org.

Friday N.H. News Roundup - July 3, 2015

Jul 3, 2015
Sara Plourde / NHPR

We're talking about the top news stories of the week: Chris Christie becomes the fourteenth contender in the Republican Presidential primary, and heads straight to the Granite State. New Hampshire U.S. Senator Kelly Ayotte announces her plans to run for reelection in 2016.  And as of this week, Granite Staters must officially say goodbye to handheld devices in the car.

Guests:

Jason Merwin Photography

NHPR's Sean Hurley continues his Summer Stock series with a visit to the New London Barn Playhouse, a theater known for cultivating young talent.  The actress Laura Linney credits the Barn with her love of theater.  Broadway legend Steven Schwartz, creator of Godspell and Wicked, got his start there.  And as Sean discovered, there's even a well known NPR reporter who once graced the stage of the old Barn.

Paige Sutherland for NHPR

After officially entering the GOP presidential race in his home state of New Jersey on Tuesday, Gov. Chris Christie kicked off his campaign with a five-day trip to New Hampshire.

At a town hall event in Sandown Tuesday night, Christie told voters, "I want to be the next president of the United States and I plan to win the next election." And he's relying, in large part, on his personality to help him do that.

Brian Hoffman via flickr Creative Commons

If today's installment of Something Wild fell to my NH Audubon cohorts, it would be easy to feature our national symbol, the Bald Eagle--perfect for patriotic Fourth of July! Instead, "NH Forest Guy" wracks his brain to make a tree connection to our nation's birthday. All I could come up with is that bottle rockets are affixed to wooden sticks and that firecrackers and other pyrotechnics are constructed and packaged using cardboard and paper--all derived from tree. No trees? No fireworks!

Jacob Carozza for NHPR

It’s the busiest time of the year for Champny’s Fireworks in Bow. Deborah Colby, who owns the store, says her customers are spending anywhere from $15 to $3,000 on fireworks. Colby says some of the most popular products are the ones that used to be illegal, such as reloadable fireworks.

“They tend to be a good value and they’re very beautiful,” Colby says. “They tend to go a little higher sometimes than some of the multi-shot cakes.”

Sara Plourde / NHPR

You know summer is the perfect time for cookouts and campfires, but did you know that it's also the time to cut & split wood so it can season for winter? Do you know what to look for when you're foraging for firewood around your campsite? (Pro tip: look for long, green tinder for the perfect marshmallow roasters!)

Whether it's time to place an order or time to make s'mores, use our printable guide to firewood as a year-round reference.

File Photo / NHPR

New Hampshire Senator Jeanne Shaheen is one of a dozen lawmakers from both parties calling on the Department of Veterans Affairs to provide benefits to members of the military who survived mustard gas testing during World War II.

Recently NPR reported that the Department of Defense tested mustard gas on 60,000 US troops, often grouping them by race or ethnicity. Many survivors have been rejected for health care and other VA benefits.

New Hampshire’s tourism industry is gearing up for a strong Independence Day holiday weekend.

The state tourism forecast, produced by the Institute for New Hampshire Studies, calls for more than 900,000 visitors over the three-day weekend, spending over $140 million.

Those numbers would be in line with the state's overall summer forecasts, which project a 3 percent rise in the number of visitors and the amount of money those visitors will spend over last year. Those forecasts are slightly higher than other recent projections.

www.merrimack4th.com

You may be planning a lazy holiday weekend this Fourth of July. But for many presidential candidates, the Fourth is just another opportunity to work for votes, though with one big difference: On Independence Day, the campaign trail is likely to follow a parade route.

Hannah McCarthy for NHPR

When Gabe Rogers talks about beer, it’s with the casual confidence of an expert chemist. Rogers is the co-founder of Garrison City Beerworks in Dover, New Hampshire. It’s that depth of knowledge – which translates into the quality of his beers - that first caught the attention of his business partner Mike Nadeau.

NHPR Staff

New Hampshire and Vermont officials are attending the grand opening of the new location of the White River Junction Vet Center.

The Vet Center provides readjustment counseling for combat veterans and military sexual trauma victims as well as bereavement issues.

The White River Junction Vet Center has moved to a new 5,000-square-foot, handicap accessible facility that officials say better meets the needs of its veterans.

Rick Pilot 2000 via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/8bLouF

Officials in New Hampshire and Maine are warning swimmers and boaters to heed water conditions in the wake of heavy rainfall and several tragedies and near tragedies.

New Hampshire Marine Patrol Sgt. Josh Dirth said Wednesday's inch of rainfall can bring debris into waterways, create undertows that weren't there before and will make water temperatures colder — which can diminish a swimmer's physical and mental faculties.

mwmn via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/9NC6L6

The organization behind the “Ride the Wilds” ATV network in the North Country is in talks with Northern Pass about getting a multimillion-dollar donation. But the founder of the group says accepting such a donation would not indicate Ride the Wilds endorses the controversial project.

Under the terms being discussed Northern Pass would give the North Country Off Highway Recreational Vehicle Coalition as much as $500,000 immediately, along with about 1,100 acres of land in the Diamond Pond area in Stewartstown and Colebrook. That land is valued at about $1.5 million.

Courtesy ajmexico via Flickr / Creative Commons / https://flic.kr/p/5ZWGsP

Predicting the future of technology is never easy. The incredible capabilities of the smartphone in my pocket today were nearly inconceivable in 1989.

That’s when NHPR’s Leslie Bennett made this fateful comment:

“It seems like telephones have gotten as complicated as they’re ever going to get. I may regret saying that.” 

Ouch – sorry, Leslie. She was speaking from Datatech ’89, a business technology trade show in Manchester. The vendors she spoke with shared their visions for office technology in the ‘90s and beyond:

“These fax machines can talk back and forth to each other. And we do have some that are live, actually hooked up to live telephone lines … We can talk to Japan if we want to, or Russia, or anywhere else.” 

That’s right … fax machines were a hot item in 1989. Makes you wonder, doesn’t it? What exciting gadget from today will be a fossil tomorrow?

From The Archives this week, we revisit Leslie Bennett’s story from Datatech ’89.


JAMES A. KIMBLE/POOL PHOTO

Arthur Collins of Manchester was sentenced to 30-years-to-life in prison after pleading guilty to second degree murder Wednesday at the Rockingham County Superior Court in Brentwood.

The 46-year-old handyman told the judge that he fatally shot George Jodoin 14 years ago while Jodoin was sleeping in bed at home in Auburn.

Ken Rudin for NHPR

July 1, 1995 – In the race for the 1996 Republican presidential nomination, Senate Majority Leader Bob Dole holds a 39-point lead over Sen. Phil Gramm in an average of national polls.

Flicker/M&R Glasgow

As of July 1, all babies born in New Hampshire will be screened for a rare genetic disorder.

Severe Combined Immunodeficiency Disorder, or SCID, is often called “the bubble boy disease.” Trish Tilley with the Department of Health and Human Services explains why.  

"This is when babies just really can’t fight off any infection," says Tilley. "It’s a very rare, inherited disorder."

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

  Republican U.S. Senator Kelly Ayotte kicked off her re-election bid Tuesday night in Manchester.

She spoke with NHPR's Morning Edition about seeking a second term, and weighed in on last week's two historic decisions by the U.S. Supreme Court.

Historically, this is a bit early to make an announcement. We’re still 17 months out from the election. Is this is a move as some have suggested to get a jump on your likely Democratic opponent Gov. Maggie Hassan, who’s embroiled in her own state budget battle?

Photo by Rich Beauchesne/Seacoastonline

Portsmouth Police Sgt. Aaron Goodwin was fired last week, after an independent report cited him for several ethics violations for accepting a disputed $2.7 million inheritance.

But the story doesn’t end there, as the controversy has raised questions about the future of the city's police commission.

A judge also has yet to rule on whether he can keep the money.

Elizabeth Dinan is a reporter for the Portsmouth Herald.

She’s been following the story and joined NHPR's Morning Edition to give us the latest.

raymondclarkeimages via Flickr/CC - http://ow.ly/P0vI6

  New Hampshire's "hands free" driving law has now taken effect. That means those on the road must now put away cellphones, GPS, tablets and any other hand-held voice or data devices, even at stop signs or when stuck in traffic, unless the devices are being operated through a hands-free option, such as a Bluetooth connection. 

Those under age 18 can’t use any devices, even hands-free ones, while driving.  

Two-way radios are still allowed. And calls to 911 or other emergency responders are legal even if they’re not hands-free.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

As of Wednesday, New Hampshire is now living under a six-month temporary state spending plan based on the last budget’s funding levels.

That means some agencies that were guaranteed increased funding in the 2016-2017 budget plan will be in flux until a new plan is crafted. That includes additional money for substance abuse treatment, a 10-bed crisis unit at New Hampshire Hospital and increased funds for winter road maintenance.

FILE

A Manchester man will plead guilty Wednesday to the 2001 fatal shooting of a pawn shop owner, making it the first conviction for the state’s Cold Case unit, which opened six years ago.

Arthur Collins, 46, was arrested back in 2012 after the state’s Cold Case unit reopened the case earlier that year. This is one of 104 unsolved homicides the unit was given to look into starting in 2009.

Paige Sutherland for NHPR

New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie didn’t waste much time hitting the campaign trail after declaring his candidacy for the GOP presidential nomination Tuesday morning. Just hours after the announcement at his former high school in his home state, Christie met with voters in New Hampshire.

Sam Evans-Brown / NHPR

Nearly one third of the farms in New Hampshire are owned and operated by women, which is well above the national average. Farmers and agricultural officials believe that could help agriculture continue to grow in the Granite State.

These were some of the insights from a roundtable discussion at Dimond Hill farm in Concord, attended by Congresswoman Ann Kuster, and US Deputy Secretary for Agriculture, Krysta Harden.

Russell Sellers / Flickr Creative Commons

There are more than 113,000 military veterans in the state of New Hampshire. That’s about 8.5 percent of the total population. According to the Spring Granite State Poll, more than half of those may vote in the GOP Primary, rather than the Democratic Primary. For more on how veterans may vote in New Hampshire’s primary elections, we turn to Andrew Smith. He’s the director of the UNH Survey Center. He spoke with NHPR’s Peter Biello.
 

Your poll found that nearly 54 percent of veterans planned on voting in the GOP primary. Was this surprising to you?

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