News

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New Hampshire tourism officials are expecting more than 15.9 million out-of-state visitors this summer, 3 percent more than last summer.

They say the visitors are anticipated to spend a little over $2 billion, also up 3 percent from a year ago.

More than 40 percent of all visitors to New Hampshire come during the summer. Many come from New England, the mid-Atlantic States, and eastern Canada.

New Hampshire Sen. Kelly Ayotte is joining with three fellow Republicans to introduce legislation to eliminate what they view as an outdated and duplicative government agency.

The bill, dubbed the "Just Google It Act," would eliminate the National Technical Information Services. Ayotte and her co-sponsors say the agency prints and sells copies of government documents that can be found for free online through a simple search.

Kelly Swann

For the last few months students from The Center for Cartooning Studies have been meeting with veterans at the VA Hospital in White River Junction.  The hope is that a collection of veterans stories can be turned into an anthology of visual stories - comic strips based on the veterans' experiences. 

Garrett Vonk

A recent study by the Foundation for Healthy Communities found frequent delays in hospital discharges for medically cleared patients in New Hampshire. Data collected from 21 acute care hospitals in the state revealed that over half of affected patients were over the age of 65. 

wooleywonderworks / Flickr Creative Commons

Advocates for veterans in the North Country are working with state and local law enforcement agencies and the court system to create a court diversion program for veterans. 

The diversion program will attempt to keep some veterans accused of non-violent crimes from going to jail. It’s designed to help veterans treat the underlying problems that cause them to have run-ins with police. 

Dave Canter is co-chair of Vet-to-Vet, a peer support program for veterans in Gorham. He says this is not a "get out of jail free" card.

 A Maryland man leading a Boy Scout troop in the North Country died yesterday, apparently due to a heart attack, says New Hampshire Fish and Game.

Vernon R. Rippeon of Westminster collapsed about one and one-half miles up the Crawford Path in Bean’s Purchase.

CPR was started immediately but Rippeon, 51, died on the trail. 

Rippeon and three other adults were leading a Boy Scout troop that included his two sons. The group planned on a five-day hike staying at several Appalachian Mountain Club huts.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Iowa and New Hampshire have historically been the opening bells in the presidential nomination process.

But there are growing signs that the states may be losing their clout. Candidates appear to be more focused on running national campaigns, as opposed to connecting with voters in early primary states.

Michael Brindley/NHPR

The annual event known as "PorcFest" is getting underway in northern New Hampshire.

The week-long Porcupine Freedom Festival aims to bring together supporters of the Free State Project, which aims to convince 20,000 people to move New Hampshire to push for smaller government and more libertarian policies.

Lead producer Kristin Weitzel says this year’s gathering will include discussions of government surveillance programs and medical marijuana, among many other topics.

weirsbeach.com

Laconia has wrapped up the 92nd annual Motorcycle Week, in which thousands took part in local events and motorcycle tours into the Mount Washington Valley despite periods of heavy rain. 

While Motorcycle Week has sometimes been characterized by arrests and unruly behavior - or at least concerns about such behavior - Captain William Cleary of the Laconia Police Department says that wasn’t the case this year. “We’ve had extremely large crowds all week – nice crowds, well behaved,” he said. “Arrests and numbers like that are down. Our tickets and accidents are down as well.”

New Hampshire maple syrup producers saw higher yields last winter compared to the previous year.

Data from the U.S. Department of Agriculture found New Hampshire produced 154,000 gallons of syrup this year, compared to 112,000 in 2014.

Cold weather shortened the maple syrup season by several days in 2015, but yield per tap rose in New Hampshire over the winter.

Syrup production in the northeast totaled 2.96 million gallons, up 7 percent from 2014.

Chris Jensen for NHPR

A radical event took place Saturday in a most traditional setting: a tiny, white, classic New England church in Shelburne. Mary Catherine White was ordained and now considers herself a Roman Catholic priest.

With about three dozen - sometimes tearful and proudly independent friends and relatives watching - White became one of just over 200 ordained women worldwide who say they are Roman Catholic priests. The Vatican says they are not priests because  priests have always been - and must always be - men.

The manager of the Lebanon Municipal Airport is confident that discounted airline tickets will help to draw more customers for the airport to keep its operating subsidy. 

So far this year, the airport has seen an 11.4 percent drop in the number of passengers flying out of Lebanon. 

Sheryl Rich-Kern, NHPR

The only flying B-29 bomber from World War II touched down in Nashua on Friday, where it remains for the weekend for public tours.

On Friday afternoon at the Boire Field Airport in Nashua, dozens wait to get their first glimpse of the Boeing B-29, the same class of bomber plane that flew in the raiding missions in Japan.

The 92-year-old Pete Ziner moves assuredly with his cane, his memories equally as strong. He says he was a radar operator in the 315th bomb wing, one of the last to go overseas before the war ended.

  When he was young, George H.W. Bush, got some advice from his mother, first about life, and then about tennis: Don’t brag and bend your knees when you volley.

Bush’s White House Chief of Staff, former New Hampshire Governor John H. Sununu, says Bush’s reluctance to talk about himself has meant his presidency has been overlooked. Sununu’s new book is an effort to change that – it’s called The Quiet Man, and he joined Weekend Edition to talk about it. 

Sara Plourde / NHPR; Data: Legislative Budget Assistant

A show-down over budget politics is brewing between New Hampshire’s Democratic Governor and Republican controlled Legislature.

Renewable energy advocates hope they can use it as an opportunity to convince budget writers to reconsider funneling money away from renewable incentives to fund the Department of Homeland Security.

Jack Rodolico

The Environmental Protection Agency is taking action against Brady Sullivan Properties because of lead contamination.

The order demands Brady Sullivan clean up a mixed commercial and luxury apartment building in Manchester by July 15, and lays the groundwork for EPA to potentially fine or sue the landlord.

In May, Brady Sullivan hired a contractor to do sandblasting in Mill West, a converted mill. The contractor didn’t have the proper permits, and spread lead dust into more than three-quarters of the apartments above.

Michael Brindley for NHPR

An iconic part of Laconia’s downtown will soon be reborn.

In a deal announced this week, the Belknap Economic Development Council will purchase the historic Colonial Theatre for $1.4 million.

The city will loan the group the money to buy the theater, and assist in raising the $15 million needed for renovations.

The Colonial opened in 1914, but has been shut down since 2001.

Justin Slattery, executive director of the Belknap Economic Development Council, joined NHPR’s Morning Edition to talk about plans for the theater.

Jennifer Cochran / Flickr/Creative Commons

Amherst Public Works Director Bruce Berry was a happy man last spring when Gov. Maggie Hassan signed the first increase to the state’s gas tax in more than 20 years.

The legislation promised to double the money the state doles out to repair municipally owned bridges, from $6.8 million a year to $13.6 million. At the time, Amherst had three bridges “red-listed” as structurally deficient, including one on Manchester Road that had been closed for 18 months.

The financial partnership between local governments and the state of New Hampshire has splintered since the recession. 

Paige Sutherland for NHPR

After a stretch of long days at the State House and a threat of a veto from the governor, Senate and House budget writers signed off on a two-year spending plan Thursday afternoon.

The $11.3 billion Republican-backed budget passed without any of the significant changes Gov. Maggie Hassan called for earlier that morning.

Sara Plourde / NHPR

Negotiators in the House and Senate agreed to a compromise version of the next two-year budget earlier this week. Here's a summary of how the deal was reached.

Courtesy of New Hampshire Audubon

This week on Something Wild we further demonstrate that nature is everywhere…by going inside. We’re at the Currier Museum of Art looking at an exhibit of prints by John James Audubon from about 175 years ago. 

Shaheen Applauds Decision to Put Woman on $10 Bill

Jun 18, 2015
Eli Christman / Flickr Creative Commons

New Hampshire Senator Jeanne Shaheen is praising the Treasury Department’s decision to put a woman on the $10 bill in the year 2020.

She says it may not be the change to the $20 bill she had called for, but it’s a big step forward for women.

Shaheen had introduced legislation in April to put a woman on the $20 bill.

In that bill, Shaheen advocated for Harriet Tubman on the $20. Tubman was the choice of the advocates for the “Women on the $20” campaign. But Shaheen says she has her own personal favorite.

Brady Carlson / NHPR

If a bakery does its work right, there will be something for every customer. Katie Johnson, the owner of From Scratch Baking Company in Wolfeboro, shows off her offerings: cases of peanut butter brownies, red velvet cupcakes, and salted chocolate cookies. 

After outcry from students and faculty, the Pembroke School Board has overturned a decision to change the title of the top job at Pembroke Academy from "headmaster" to "principal."

The Concord Monitor reports the school board voted 3-2 late Tuesday night to reverse its earlier decision.

The board voted last fall to change the title to principal, the rationale being that it's a more fitting title for a public school.

 

A social service agency that provides heating-fuel assistance and other funding for North Country residents is closing five of its eight walk-in offices to save administrative costs.

Michael Coughlin, CEO of Tri-County Community Action Program, tells the Valley News the closings are planned this month. He said the same services will be provided, but electronic mail and regular mail will be used more to reach clients.

Staying open are offices in Ashland, Tamworth and Berlin.

Closing are offices in Colebrook, Groveton, Littleton, Woodsville and Lebanon.

C. Hanchey via Flickr CC.

There’s no shortage of options for Nashua voters when it comes to who’ll be the next mayor of the state’s second-largest city.

Six candidates are confirmed to be running, and that’s a big change from four years ago, when the city’s current Mayor Donnalee Lozeau ran unopposed.

Lozeau isn’t seeking re-election this time around, which has opened the door for others hoping for the job.

Kathryn Marchocki is a reporter for the Nashua Telegraph. She joined NHPR's Morning Edition to talk about how the race is shaping up.

State health officials have analyzed the first 100 out of about 500 blood samples taken from people exposed to a contaminant found in one of the wells on Pease International Tradeport.

The first 100 blood tests show concentrations of Perfluorochemicals PFOS and PFOA that are higher than the average American’s, but lower than other exposed groups like those drinking water downstream from a West Virginia DuPont factory.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

 

New Hampshire Sen. Jeanne Shaheen says the U.S. Treasury Department's decision to feature a woman on a redesigned $10 bill will let young girls know that they too can grow up and "do something great for their country."

The Democrat, who earlier this year introduced legislation to put a woman on the $20 bill, said Wednesday that adding a woman to U.S. currency followed "a tremendous grassroots movement."

NHPR

In his first visit to the state after announcing his candidacy for president, Donald Trump told a crowd in Manchester that because he's a businessman and not a politician, he’s the only one to solve the nation’s problems.

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