US Navy

Governor Chris Sununu wants the former Pease Air Force base included in a first-ever national study on the health effects of toxic chemicals called PFCs.

Sununu wrote this week to the federal agency leading the study, the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry. It’s part of the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention.

The latest federal defense spending bill authorizes the agency to spend $7 million to study the health impacts of perfluorinated chemicals, or PFCs.

The cemetery in New Boston, New Hampshire sits at the top of a hill, what was once the center of town. Now it overlooks Main Street and the Piscataquog River valley.

But the cemetery - and one gravestone in particular - still draws visitors.

New Boston is a small town on the Piscataquog River, a half hour drive from Manchester. It’s famous for its annual Fourth of July firing of the town’s Molly Stark cannon, perhaps the oldest cannon in the world still in use.

Google maps

A new non-profit organization wants to open an addiction recovery center in Concord–in space that was only recently occupied by a different drug abuse recovery group.

Hope for New Hampshire Recovery announced last month that it would be closing its Concord office, along with three other locations around the state.

Since then, the state and others have come forward with funding for all the other centers, at least in the short-term, but not for the Concord center. Its Concord location closed its doors March 2. 

Attorney General's Office

  The head of a New Hampshire prep school's board of trustees says a teacher who was let go in 2008 for "repeated boundary crossings" involving students should have been dismissed earlier and shouldn't have been given a favorable recommendation.

A letter from Archibald Cox to the St. Paul's School community said Thursday that David Pook's departure was "overdue and badly handled."

The 47-year-old Pook was charged last week with witness tampering and conspiring to commit perjury following a grand jury investigation into misconduct allegations at St. Paul's.

Twenty years ago this week, New Hampshire Audubon, the Society for the Protection of New Hampshire Forests and NHPR took our first tentative steps on a journey that would take listeners on weekly outdoor adventures all over the state.

Something Wild’s very first episode featured host, Rosemary Conroy, then with SPNHF, encouraging us to go outside and look and listen for the early signs of spring.

In the intervening decades, we’ve covered a lot of ground; whether it was Rosemary walking through the finer details of forest succession… 

Courtesy Woody Little / Toxics Action Center

Environmental groups say they plan to sue a Bethlehem landfill owner for allegedly dumping contaminants into the Ammonoosuc River.

The news comes just days before a Town Meeting vote on a plan to expand the site.

Vermont-based Casella Waste Services is dismissing the threat as a political stunt.

The announcement came from two Boston-based nonprofits – the Conservation Law Foundation and the Toxics Action Center, where Woody Little is an organizer.

After nearly two full hours of floor debate, the New Hampshire Senate green-lit a plan to keep New Hampshire's Medicaid expansion going for another five years.

Todd Bookman/NHPR

The New Hampshire Senate passed a bill on Thursday that backers say would better protect animals from cruelty and neglect.

The legislation comes on the heels of several high profile cases, including the removal of 75 Great Danes from a home in Wolfeboro. Under current law, that breeder didn’t qualify as running a commercial kennel, and therefore wasn’t subject to inspection.

Todd Bookman/NHPR

It’s Town Meeting time, and in Rye, a long-simmering controversy is back on the ballot. On Tuesday, voters there will decide the fate of the old Town Hall.

For many in town, the 180-year old building raises civic pride. Others are simply ready to raze it.

Jason Moon, NHPR

As next Tuesday’s town meeting day approaches, state lawmakers are still dealing with the fallout from a nor'easter that delayed votes in dozens of communities across the state last year.

A bill approved by the Senate on Thursday sought to resolve an ongoing power struggle between the Secretary of State’s office and town officials over who should be able to postpone an election — for weather, safety or other reasons. 

Peter Biello / NHPR

In some countries in Europe, red wine is part of daily life. Not so in the US. And as a result, Americans may be missing out on the health benefit of a particular antioxidant found in the skins of grapes. Now a chemist at UNH is trying to get more of this antixodiant, resveratrol, into the American diet through coffee. 

Glen Miller is chair of the chemistry department at the University of New Hampshire, and a few years ago, he first got the idea of putting resveratrol into spring water. But when he did, he saw a huge problem. 

Courtesy Smuttynose Brewing Company

Smuttynose Brewing Company will be sold at auction Friday afternoon in Hampton.

The iconic New Hampshire craft brewer announced in January that it could no longer pay its bills and needed new ownership to survive.

Courtesy the Okeny family

  Ageth Okeny fled war in Sudan with her four children. In Egypt, she says she applied for refugee resettlement.


“They asked me in interview: ‘You have specific place to go?’ I said no, I just want to leave with my kid[s], I need the safety place to be safe with my children,” Okeny says.


“So they brought me here to Manchester,” she says.



Police in a New Hampshire city are making efforts to address loud motorcycles in Portsmouth.

Police Chief Robert Merner says he is aware of a proposed ordinance currently in a Senate committee that would ban "motorcycle-only checkpoints," but adds he has ordered decibel reading equipment for his officers to be used citywide.

The Portsmouth Herald reports Merner says enforcement of noise levels will begin in the spring during motorcycle season.

Chris Jensen | NHPR

New Hampshire's Fish and Game Department is reminding snowmobilers to use caution when riding on lakes and ponds, as recent warming trends have created thin ice.

The department says new snowfall can hide thin ice and open water. It says snowmobilers should never venture onto lakes or ponds unless they are absolutely certain of a safe route across the frozen surface.

Riders are encouraged to personally check the ice thickness before riding. And they should also bring along a rescue rope, ice picks, a personal flotation device, or a life preserver — just in case.

Todd Bookman / NHPR

President Donald Trump announced this week his plan to impose stiff tariffs on steel and aluminum imports. Gov. Chris Sununu joined many federal government officials in opposing the plan.

Val Zanchuck is the CEO of Graphicast, a manufacturing company in Jaffrey. Morning Edition Host Rick Ganley spoke with Zanchuck about how the proposed tariffs could affect his business.

NHPR File Photo

Tens of thousands of people have had their power restored Thursday, after a winter storm dumped about a foot of heavy, wet snow on New Hampshire.

As of 3 p.m. Thursday, about 37,000 customers – mostly in Southeastern New Hampshire – were still waiting on power.

Unitil spokeswoman Carol Valianti says the snow that fell on that region is like cement. It adheres to trees and branches and wires, and brings them down.

On top of that, she says the preceding nor'easter left trees brittle from wind and loaded the ground with moisture, weakening root systems.

Britta Greene / New Hampshire Public Radio

The Executive Council unanimously approved $600,000 for Manchester-based Hope for New Hampshire Recovery Wednesday, despite a recent audit finding the organization has failed to comply with state contracts in the past.

Sara Plourde for NHPR

A plan to extend New Hampshire’s Medicaid expansion will have its first big test on Thursday, when it goes before the full Senate for a vote.

Dan Tuohy / NHPR


Democratic gubernatorial candidate Steve Marchand has a plan to curb gun violence ... just don’t call it gun control, he says.

"Note - I don't call it gun control because that implies I'm trying to take your guns. It's reducing gun violence," he said on The Exchange on Wednesday.

Annie Ropeik / NHPR

The state House of Representatives put transgender rights one step away from the governor's desk Wednesday.

Lawmakers voted 195-129 to send the Senate a bill adding gender identity to existing state anti-discrimination laws.

New Hampshire would be the last New England state to do so.

Peter Biello / NHPR

The director of the New England VA Healthcare system announced his retirement Wednesday.

Dr. Michael Mayo-Smith's departure comes a day after New Hampshire's two congresswomen, Annie Kuster and Carol Shea-Porter, called for his removal.

Allegations of mismangement at New England VA facilities have dogged Mayo-Smith over much of the past year. Last summer, a dozen whistleblowers at the Manchester VA came forward with allegations of substandard care that caused some patients lasting harm. They were vocal opponents of Mayo-Smith and called for his removal then.

It’s not often that a political candidate announces his or her platform, and then is immediately challenged by passionate opponents.

But last week, Democratic gubernatorial candidate Steve Marchand stood on the steps of the Lebanon City Hall taking questions - not from reporters, but passionate gun rights advocates.

NHPR File Photo


The New Hampshire House has passed a bill that would kick-start further cleanup of the Coakley Landfill Superfund site in North Hampton. 


Lawmakers on Wednesday voted against a committee’s recommendation that the idea be studied further. Then, they passed the bill, 207 to 118. 


The measure tells the state Department of Environmental Services to spur remediation at Coakley by getting money from the towns and other entities responsible for the pollution. 


Weston Observatory

An early morning earthquake shook the Contoocook and Concord area, the Weston Observatory at Boston College confirmed today.

The 2.4-scale earthquake shook some Granite Staters awake around 5 a.m. Wednesday.

The New Hampshire area is not unfamiliar with such seismic activity. Just last month, a magnitude 2.7 quake struck near East Kingston, according to the U.S. Geological Survey.

An effort to ban soda and other sugary drinks from children's menus in New Hampshire has fizzled.

The House on Tuesday voted 292-39 against a bill that would have applied to restaurants that serve children's meals that bundle together food and a beverage for one price. Drinks served with such meals would have been limited to healthier choices such as milk, water or juice.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

New Hampshire Sen. Jeanne Shaheen says an Interstate 89 bridge project that crosses the Connecticut River into Vermont is getting $10 million in federal funding.

Shaheen, a Democrat, said Tuesday the funds would rehabilitate bridges that carry northbound and southbound traffic between Lebanon, New Hampshire, and Hartford, Vermont.

NHPR Staff

New Hampshire lawmakers are again voting on whether to expand the state's anti-discrimination law to include transgender people.

The House is set to vote Wednesday on a bill that would ban discrimination in housing, employment and public accommodations based on someone's gender identity in addition to the protections that already exist based on sex, religion and sexual orientation. Lawmakers tabled a virtually identical bill last year, leaving New Hampshire the only New England state without such protections.

Peter Biello / NHPR

Congresswoman Annie Kuster is calling for the removal of a high-ranking VA official who she says needs to be held accountable for problems at New England's VA medical centers.

In a letter sent last month to VA Secretary David Shulkin, Kuster requests that Dr. Michael Mayo-Smith be removed from his position as director of the New England VA Healthcare System.

VA whistleblowers have been calling for his removal for months, saying that he knew about deficiencies at the Manchester VA but didn't do enough to help. 

Todd Bookman/NHPR

Representatives for the New Hampshire woman who won a half-billion dollar Powerball jackpot will claim the prize on Wednesday.

The winner, however, won’t be present.

Identified only as Jane Doe in court paperwork, she’s asking a judge to let her remain anonymous despite having already signed the back of the $559 million Powerball jackpot ticket.