News

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

The Republican-controlled Senate Thursday yet again killed a bill along party lines to create a state minimum wage in New Hampshire.

Virginia Prescott

Sweeney Todd, the 1979 Sondheim revenge tragedy musical set in Victorian London, is a challenging and musically complex play to stage even for professional companies with big budgets - even more so for the Vermont based non-profit, Main Street Arts.  Sweeney Todd is part of a larger strategy to build community and coordination between a number of small arts organizations on either side of the Connecticut River - a collaboration that defies the sinister nature of the plot. 

josh rogers\nhpr

State Education Commissioner Frank Edelblut says he anonymously donated $1,000 to help fund a school board’s legal defense against the department he now leads.

joycecraig.org

Former Manchester Alderman Joyce Craig is making another bid for mayor of the state's largest city.

The Democrat announced her candidacy Thursday.

Craig first ran for mayor in 2015, losing by just 64 votes to Manchester Mayor Ted Gatsas.

Speaking NHPR's Morning Edition, Craig says she would bring a new approach to some of the issues facing the city.

Nathaniel Boesch

The Bookshelf is NHPR's series on authors and books with ties to the Granite State. All Things Considered host Peter Biello features authors, covers literary events and publishing trends, and gets recommendations from each guest on what books listeners might want to add to their own bookshelves. 

If you have an author or book you think we should profile on The Bookshelf, send us an email. The address is books@nhpr.org.

Candidate's Facebook Profile

The state Senate is expected to vote Thursday on a bill that would gradually increase the minimum wage in New Hampshire to $12 an hour by September of 2018.

New Hampshire currently has no minimum wage, effectively defaulting to the federal minimum wage of $7.25 an hour. 

  It’s Sunshine Week, a nationwide event organized each year by the American Society of News Editors to highlight the public’s right to know about how their government operates.

David Saad is president of Right to Know New Hampshire, a nonprofit organization that advocates for greater transparency in government.

CREDIT JASON MOON FOR NHPR

  Democrats are introducing legislation aimed at protecting towns from lawsuits that postponed Tuesday's elections due to a winter storm.

The bill says any municipal elections set for Tuesday that were postponed are "legalized, ratified and confirmed." Senate Minority Leader Jeff Woodburn is the bill's sponsor.

Dozens of towns moved their elections due to the snowstorm, despite Republican Gov. Chris Sununu's calls to hold them. He suggested towns could be open to lawsuits if they chose to postpone.

appleswitch via Flickr Creative Commons

 

Authorities in New Hampshire say a juvenile has been charged with murder after a man was found apparently shot to death and a woman was found with a gunshot wound in a Farmington home.

Assistant Attorney General Jason Casey says police responded to a call at the residence just after 12 p.m. Wednesday. They found two adults with gunshot wounds. The man was pronounced dead and the woman was hospitalized with injuries not considered life-threatening.

Casey says the juvenile was arrested and charged with second-degree murder and attempted murder.

Emily Corwin/NHPR

The Senate Finance Committee Wednesday OK’d a bill that would give nearly $37 million to cities and towns to fix local roads and bridges.  

FLORIANHUAG / FLICKR/CC

The Senate Finance Committee approved a measure Wednesday to help Amherst residents get access to clean drinking water.

According to the Assistant Environment Services Commissioner Clark Freise, more than 100 homes in the town have been contaminated by the chemical PFOA.

TSCELEB NEWS / FLICKR/CC

A proposal to spend more state money to fight drug trafficking on New Hampshire’s highways unanimously cleared the Senate Finance Committee Wednesday. But estimating how much that effort will cost – is no simple task. 

http://www.newmarketschoolprojects.com/

Voters in several towns weighed in on school construction projects yesterday

In Hampton, voters approved a $26 million renovation of the town’s middle school after rejecting the idea last year.

Kathleen Murphy is Hampton School District Superintendent.

“This is pretty good, this is pretty exciting. It’s a project that is long overdue but one that I think will be a testament to the Hampton community.”

Paul Proshin / Unsplash

Nearly one in ten New Hampshire teens reported being the victim of physical dating violence during the past year, and more than one in ten New Hampshire teens reported being the victim of sexual dating violence during the past year.

Those are just some of the findings in a new report from the Carsey School of Public Policy at the University of New Hampshire. Assuistant Professor Katie Edwards is one of the authors of the study. She spoke with NHPR’s Peter Biello.

Mike Mozart

Proposed Senate Bill 247 aims to prevent lead poisoning in children by strengthening lead testing requirements for children, and placing stricter requirements on properties containing lead paint. For some families, lead poisoning has caused long-term health problems that sometimes don't appear until years after exposure, and experts think the restrictions are not strong enough. However, landlords worry that the new requirements would be difficult to comply with, and come at a huge cost, and funding will be insufficient. For example, companies like Brady Sullivan are still managing fallout from lead poisoning several years ago that contributed to health problems in children living at their properties. We'll look at all sides of this issue.


Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Two major school renovation projects that had failed in the past finally got the green light from  voters during Tuesday's Town Meeting. 

Voters in Newmarket approved a $39 million renovation of Newmarket Junior/Senior High School and Newmarket Elementary School. Seacoast Online reports this was the fourth version of a school renovation project to go before voters in the last 11 years. 

Jason Moon for NHPR

Tuesday saw a collision of two great New Hampshire traditions: nor’easters and town meeting day. They might not seem like the best pairing, but as NHPR’s Jason Moon reports the two found a way to coexist.

Michael Brindley for NHPR

A Senate bill that would alter the definition of “domicile” for voting purposes has caused an outcry among Democrats and others who claim it unnecessarily complicates the voting process and would suppress the vote among certain groups, including college students.

At a recent packed hearing, the vast majority were in opposition to the proposed changes.

Republican State Senator Regina Birdsell, lead sponsor of the bill, says her intention is not to exclude anyone. 

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

  The late winter blizzard led town officials across in New Hampshire to postpone town meetings and elections. It's a decision many people -- but not all -- are happy about.

Brady Carlson for NHPR / NHPR

Health care reform, public education and infrastructure spending are all hot topics in Congress – and the State House – nowadays. In Nashua, New Hampshire’s second largest city, Mayor Jim Donchess has been pushing his own ideas on these very issues. Sometimes, this puts him at odds with the folks calling the shots in Concord and Washington.

Recently, during a class on city government

Paige Sutherland/NHPR

Gov. Chris Sununu wants lawmakers to fast-track a bill to hire five new state troopers to focus on cutting off the drug supply from out of state. That's on top of the ten additional troopers Sununu proposed in his state spending plan last month

This measure went before the Senate Finance Committee Tuesday afternoon.

Allegra Boverman / NHPR

  New Hampshire Congresswoman Annie Kuster is calling on Republican House leaders to withdraw their health care reform bill.

The nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office estimates the bill would increase the number of people without insurance by 14 million in the first year, and 24 million by 2026.

Speaking to NHPR's Morning Edition, Kuster said she's not surprised White House officials are disputing the figures released Monday.

  Governor Chris Sununu says legislation is needed to clarify state law with regard to whether local officials have the authority to postpone Town Meeting elections.

After several communities announced Monday they were postponing local elections slated for Tuesday due to the storm, the Secretary of State's office said state law required them to hold their elections regardless of the weather.

Sununu said towns ultimately had the right to postpone, but did so at the risk of potential legal challenges.

  While many communities have opted to postpone Tuesday's Town Meeting elections due to the storm, others are moving forward with voting.

The town of Durham is still holding its town election today, despite what’s expected to be major nor’easter that could drop as much as two feet of snow.

Town Manager Todd Selig is encouraging voters to cast their ballots early, before the storm picks up in strength later in the day.

www.bernsteinshur.com

  New Hampshire U.S. Attorney Emily Gray Rice has resigned.

Rice was among the 46 U.S. attorneys appointed by President Obama who were asked last week by the Trump administration to submit their resignations.

Rice was unanimously confirmed by the Senate in January of last year, after receiving the support of both Senator Jeanne Shaheen and then-Senator Kelly Ayotte.

In a statement, Rice said she was deeply honored to serve the people of New Hampshire.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Governor Chris Sununu says the head of the state's child protective services division has been placed on administrative leave, following a report that more than 1,500 cases of suspected abuse and neglect were closed over a two-day period last year.

Paige Sutherland/NHPR

House budget writers heard six hours of public testimony last night regarding the state’s upcoming two-year spending plan.

The dozens of people who spoke mainly focused on funding for services for developmental disabilities, substance abuse and mental health.

Peter Biello / NHPR

It's a deceptively simple question: "Have you or a family member ever served in the military?" The state launched a program two years ago to get doctors, police officers, educators, and others to ask that question.

The aim was to identify people who qualify for veterans benefits. The results have been, for many people, surprising.

Tuesday’s nor’easter is causing a bit of commotion before it even arrives, sowing confusion about whether towns have the legal authority to reschedule their votes for better weather.

When weather reports began predicting a late winter nor’easter for this week, many towns around New Hampshire did something that sounds reasonable enough – they rescheduled the date of their town meetings.

NHPR

The winter tourism industry in New Hampshire provides thousands of jobs and garners millions of visits to resorts across the state. In the past few years, however, shorter, irregular seasons have forced ski resorts to adapt, either by using snow machines far more than expected, or preparing for fewer customers. Today, we're looking at how skiing, and winter sports, are changing across the Granite State. 


Pages