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During his speech to Congress Tuesday night, President Donald Trump reiterated his criticism of the Affordable Care Act, calling the health care law a “disaster.”  

"Obamacare is collapsing, and we must act decisively to protect all Americans. Action is not a choice, it is a necessity," said Trump.

Future In Sight via Caitlin Drown

New Hampshire Association for the Blind announced today that it’s getting a new name. It will be called Future In Sight. The organization’s president and CEO David Morgan says the new name better represents how the organization addresses the needs of the community.

David Morgan spoke with NHPR’s Peter Biello to discuss the change and how they plan to serve the community.

This transcript has been edited for clarity. 

Tell us, what need in the community is your organization addressing that warrants changing the organization’s name?

Paige Sutherland/NHPR

The morning after President Donald Trump’s address to Congress, Governor Chris Sununu told a crowd of Manchester businesspeople that he was inspired by the president's tone.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

  Democratic U.S. Senator Jeanne Shaheen of New Hampshire joined NHPR's Morning Edition Wednesday for reaction  to President Donald Trump addressed to a joint session of Congress.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

 

Gov. Chris Sununu pledged to invest millions of dollars in repairing roads, bridges and schools in his budget address.

But he's light on specifics when it comes to how the estimated $84 million would be doled out, leaving towns, cities and school districts wondering which potholes will be filled, classrooms remodeled and bridges rebuilt.

Governor Chris Sununu performed what is a ritual for New Hampshire governors: a tree tapping ceremony marking the official kick off of maple sugar season.  But the governor also blended some political talk with the syrup. 

Casey McDermott, NHPR

The race for the new leader of the Democratic National Committee didn’t turn out quite how New Hampshire Democratic Chairman Ray Buckley had hoped. Even so, Buckley's optimistic about new DNC Chairman Tom Perez's plans for the party and for state outreach, in particular.

Jason Moon for NHPR

A bill to create a commission to investigate a string of pediatric cancer cases on the Seacoast received unanimous support from the House Committee on Health, Human Services and Elderly Affairs today. The bill also has the support of Governor Chris Sununu.

The commission would take up the work of a now-defunct taskforce that was investigating the unusually high number of rare pediatric cancer cases on the Seacoast.

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The science fair has been a staple of science education for decades. But recently the loss of Intel, the computer chip giant, as a sponsor of the International Science and Engineering Fair is prompting some soul searching about the purpose of this educational mainstay. Do these science fairs, complete with a tri-fold poster board, really help students learn the kinds of things that prepare them for today’s science-based challenges?

Paige Sutherland/NHPR

For the past year, state and county prosecutors in New Hampshire have started enforcing a decades-old law that allows them to seek tougher penalties for drug dealers who sell lethal doses.

So far, the policy has led to a handful of convictions, with sentences ranging from a few years to 20 years in prison.

But critics warn this strategy will have little effect on the state’s epidemic of drug abuse.

Jack Rodolico

Brady Sullivan Properties, one of New Hampshire's biggest developers, will pay a fine for violating federal lead paint laws. 

According to the Environmental Protection Agency, Brady Sullivan did not disclose the existence of chipping lead paint to tenants of Mill West in Manchester before they moved in. Then the landlord exposed tenants to lead dust from a construction site below apartments.

Kandy Jaxx / Flickr

New Hampshire’s unemployment rate held steady at 2.7 percent for January, with modest job gains across a number of sectors.

Plenty of Granite Staters, including the governor, are cheering after New Hampshire scored the No. 2 spot on a new U.S. News and World Report “Best States” index. But the details behind that new ranking paint a more complex picture than that "second-in-the-nation" title suggests.

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  Officials at Plymouth State University are still working to remove cars that were caught in a student parking lot that flooded over the weekend.

More than two hundred vehicles were in the parking lot along Route 175 in Holderness Sunday morning when the nearby Pemigewasset River overflowed due to an ice dam downstream.

Chris Jensen for NHPR

  Charges have been dropped against a New Hampshire man accused of killing his 11-year-old stepdaughter by submerging her body in a river.

A court in Lancaster ruled Monday that 52-year-old Wendell Noyes was not competent to stand trial in Celina Cass' death and that his competency can't be restored. According to one evaluator, his mental illness creates a potentially serious likelihood of danger to others.

With Republicans in full control of New Hampshire’s State House for the first time in more than a decade, Republicans have been moving quickly to enact policies that have long been on their wish list.

That’s been particularly true in public education.

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A former Franklin Pierce University professor and her son appeared in U.S. Federal Court in Concord on Monday, accused of selling forged paintings by artist Leon Golub to a wealthy Florida-based art collector, Andrew Hall.

[Read background of the case by clicking here.]

During a pretrial conference, the parties expressed doubt over the ability to reach a settlement. Magistrate Judge Andrea Johnstone scheduled a jury trial for March, 2018.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

  With the future of Obamacare unclear, and GOP talk of converting Medicaid, which serves 186,000 people in New Hampshire, to a block grant system, Senator Hassan is reminding colleagues past and present that she sees changes to the program, particularly the end of expanded Medicaid, a grave threat.

Hannah McCarthy/NHPR

The Brookline Icebreakers try not to live up to that name. 

During one sunny Saturday at Lake Potanipo in Brookline, New Hampshire, club president Jon Lavoie pointed to the ice fishermen in the middle of the lake. For a snowmobiler, they are the best barometer of ice safety.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

It’s a quiet week at the Statehouse this week, but not for budget writers.

House Finance members will continue to meet with state department reps as they work to finish up their version of the state's new two-year spending plan. 

Peter Biello / NHPR

Congresswoman Annie Kuster says the government hasn't been able to keep its promise to provide military veterans with their health care under all circumstances.

Speaking at a roundtable discussion in Berlin Friday, Kuster says the U.S. should keep that promise, but its not realistic to have Department of Veterans Affairs clinics in every location.

Her comments came in response to a complaint about the VA's closing of two part-time clinics in Berlin and Colebrook.

Todd Bookman/NHPR

While angry protesters have been flooding town hall-style events across the country being held by Republican congressmen, the scene at today’s meeting in Concord felt more like a therapy session for beleaguered New Hampshire Democrats.

Hundreds hoping to hear Sens. Jeanne Shaheen and Maggie Hassan piled into an auditorium on the campus of the New Hampshire Technical Institute. They bore signs, pink "Pussyhats" and their fears about the next four years.

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Governor Chris Sununu has created a new position in his office to help shape drug prevention, treatment and recovery policy.

Maybe it's the fact that the weather felt more like May than February, but it sure felt like a pretty long week. If you need help catching up on the headlines, or you're just in the market for some interesting reads to get you through the weekend, keep scrolling. (And if you haven't yet, make sure you're signed up for our newsletters to get this and other updates right to your inbox each week.)

Emily Corwin for NHPR

As immigration officials ramp up deportation of new classes of unauthorized immigrants, more residents and visitors without documents fear run-ins with police.

On New Hampshire's diverse Southern border, a traffic stop in one town could lead to very different consequences than the same kind of stop one town over.

NHPR Staff

President Trump and Congressional Republicans are considering transforming  Medicaid - which provides health services to millions of low income people - to a block grant program. New Hampshire Gov. Chris Sununu is pitching the potential change as a way to better serve local needs, but it’s also one that carries risk.

No one knows better than teachers how quickly a bug, once introduced, can take hold. We’re not just talking about head colds and stomach viruses. Today on Something Wild we’re taking a look at how biologists are first bitten.

Courtesy photo

  A bill at the New Hampshire State House would prohibit discrimination based on gender identity. Meanwhile, President Trump has rescinded protections for transgender students that had allowed them to use school bathrooms that correspond with their gender identities. 

While politicians debate, some transgender rights advocates push for equal rights. Among those advocates is fifteen year-old Emily Fishbaugh. She's transgender and she lives in North Hampton New Hampshire.

Geoff Forrester/The Concord Monitor/POOL

Well-known Boston attorney J.W. Carney stands by the defense he provided Owen Labrie, a former St. Paul's School student, during his 2015 trial for sexual assault.

On Thursday, Labrie's hearing for a new trial on the basis his legal team poorly represented him officially wrapped up after three days. Labrie, who's now 21, is free on bail while he appeals his one year sentence.

New Hampshire Senate
Allegra Boverman / NHPR

The New Hampshire Senate voted Thursday to keep campaign contributions flowing from LLCs, but moved to tighten restrictions on political advertising. 

Senator Dan Feltes argued in vain Thursday in favor of his bill, which would have closed what he calls the Limited Liability Corporation loophole. The bill sought to prevent multiple LLCs with the same owner from collectively exceeding the individual campaign contribution limit.

The majority instead voted with Senator Andy Sanborn, who owns several LLCs himself.

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