Associated Press

Jim Cole/AP

 

A New Hampshire prep school graduate convicted of having sexual contact with a 15-year-old classmate as part of a game of sexual conquest must register as a sex offender for life, a punishment his lawyer likens to being branded.

Legal experts and reform advocates say the punishment exceeds the crime.

Nineteen-year-old Owen Labrie was convicted Friday following a two-week trial that exposed a practice at St. Paul's School in Concord known as Senior Salute, in which graduating students try to have sex with younger classmates.

 

The Portsmouth Police Department is receiving an 8-foot steel beam from the wreckage of the World Trade Center to form the centerpiece of its own Sept. 11 memorial.

A police motorcade is taking the 1,100-pound I-beam up Interstate 95 and into Portsmouth on Wednesday, Sept. 2. It will be on display at the police department for a few hours before being safely secured.

Chief Stephen DuBois plans to be tweeting the motorcade's progress. The beam is expected to reach Portsmouth mid-afternoon Wednesday.

Michael Brindley for NHPR

Police are asking for the public's help in trying to find out how and why a woman was shot and killed as she went for a weekly walk in a Manchester neighborhood.

Authorities say 62-year-old Denise Robert was walking in the North End section of Manchester at about 9 p.m. Sunday, an area regarded as a safe neighborhood, when she was shot. There were reports of a pickup truck speeding away with a white man in his 20s or 30s wearing a white tank top and having close-cropped hair.

Kate Harper for NHPR

 

Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders says international rivals would be mistaken to assume he wouldn't use military force if that's what circumstances required.

The Vermont senator says the United States should have the strongest military in the world. The U.S. should be prepared to act when it or its allies are threatened or in response to genocide. He says he is prepared to use military force, but only as a last resort.

NHPR / Michael Brindley

 

New Hampshire Gov. Maggie Hassan plans to celebrate New England Apple Day this week by making the first pick of the season in Londonderry.

Hassan plans to visit Mack's Apples in Londonderry on Wednesday afternoon, Sept. 2. Accompanying her will be Lorraine Merrill, commissioner of agriculture, and Jim Blair, president and CEO of the U.S. Apple Association.

Courtesy Photo

A proposal to launch a high-speed ferry service from Portsmouth to Cape Cod has ignited a debate.

The Portsmouth Herald reports tugboat pilot Chris Holt raised concerns about the plan Thursday at a Pease Development Authority Port Committee meeting. He says a ferry has been tried before at the Port of New Hampshire and it "didn't fly." He also questioned how the ferry would operate in and out of the port due to the strong Piscataqua River current.

Promote Our Port president Bob Hassold says he used to be a tugboat pilot and that the ferry could easily navigate the river.

File Photo

A cousin of one of the world's most notorious drug lords who prosecutors say was working to distribute cocaine in the United States has been sentenced in a New Hampshire court to 16 years in federal prison.

Manuel Jesus Gutierrez-Guzman, cousin of Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman, was sentenced Friday. He pleaded guilty in October to his role in a conspiracy to expand the reach of his cousin's drug empire into New England by distributing 1,000 or more kilograms of cocaine and other drugs. He was arrested in Spain in 2012.

 

A former inmate at the Rockingham County prison is suing the county for allegedly not providing safe conditions inside their jail cells.

The Portsmouth Herald reports Alan Brien Sr. filed the suit Aug. 11, which states a fall from his cell's bunk last year caused "serious permanent injuries."

The suit states that Brien's bed was the top bunk, which had no ladder "or other safe mechanism to enable him to climb up from or down from the bunk."

Manchester-Boston Regional Airport Tower
J. Stephen Conn / Flickr Creative Commons

 

The Manchester-Boston Regional Airport is starting a program for people who park there frequently.

"MHT FASTPASS," starting Sept. 1, will allow customers to quickly enter and exit the airport parking areas using a card tied to a debit or credit card.

Drivers would be able to use a designated lane, swipe their card, and quickly be on their way. Accounts can be managed online.

The program is free to join. Points can be earned and redeemed for free parking.

Chris Jensen for NHPR

 

Three members of New Hampshire's congressional delegation are hosting a forum about the Veterans Choice program and two new veterans' health clinics in the North Country.

Sens. Jeanne Shaheen and Kelly Ayotte and Rep. Ann McLane Kuster are being joined by Veterans Administration officials at the forum Friday at White Mountain Community College in Berlin.

Shaheen and Ayotte hosted a similar forum in May at the New Hampshire Institute of Politics in Manchester.

xandert / Morguefile

 

A federal judge has upheld a New Hampshire law the Libertarian Party argued could prevent its candidates from getting on the ballot.

Libertarians sued Secretary of State William Gardner last year, challenging new limits on how long parties have to collect signatures to petition their way onto the ballot. State law requires a third party to collect signatures equal to 3 percent of the total votes cast during the prior election. Under the change, parties can't begin gathering signatures until Jan. 1 of the election year.

Josh Rogers, NHPR

 

An attorney general's office says a Derry police officer was justified in shooting a man to death in January.

The wife of 54-year-old Andrew Toto told investigators he was disabled because of mental health issues and had been drinking heavily for days before she called 911 to report that he was armed and "looking for a suicide by cop."

As police pursued him, he drove into oncoming traffic and later pulled over and fired a shotgun at Officer Kevin Ruppel.

Ruppel fired back, striking Toto in the chest.

File Photo

 

Many Portsmouth residents are worried over the results of blood tests for people who may have been exposed to water from a contaminated city-owned well.

Officials closed the Haven well at the Pease International Tradeport in May 2014 after testing found chemicals at levels 10 times higher than the Environmental Protection Agency's Provisional Health Advisory.

Hundreds of people have been tested to see if the chemical is in their blood, and those who found out they have elevated levels are concerned over the long-term impact — particularly on children.

Dank Depot via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/9c93J6

 

State officials are continuing to seek public input as plans move ahead on the construction of four dispensaries for medical marijuana.

People can offer their feedback at Merrimack's town hall on Tuesday at 7 p.m., the fourth in a series of public hearings on the issue. The state and towns have already hosted hearings in Plymouth, Peterborough and Lebanon and will host two more in Manchester and Rochester. Each are possible locations for one of the four licensed dispensaries.

THOMAS FEARON

 

The ongoing state budget stalemate means a 10-bed mental health crisis unit at New Hampshire Hospital won't open as planned this fall.

New Hampshire has been working to improve its mental health infrastructure since settling a lawsuit with the federal government in late 2013 over inadequate services. The 2014-2015 state budget included money to build the new crisis unit, but money to hire staff and operate the unit was set to be included in the 2016-2017 budget that Gov. Maggie Hassan vetoed.

A prisoner in New Hampshire is suing the state after he was placed in secure housing for failing to shave his thick, bushy beard in violation of prison rules. A federal judge in July ordered prison officials to give 35-year-old Frank Staples a lower security classification and transfer him to a less restrictive housing unit pending the outcome of his religious rights lawsuit.

Ryan Lessard for NHPR

 

The U.S. Department of Education is renewing a five-year $1.5 million grant that helps low-income students, those with disabilities and students who are the first in their families to attend college at the University of New Hampshire.

The grant program, created as part of President Lyndon Johnson's War on Poverty, targets students from disadvantaged backgrounds. At UNH, students who complete first-year transition and sophomore engagement programs become eligible for scholarship awards.

Delaywaves via Creative Commons

 

The Democratic governors of Connecticut and neighboring Vermont are heading to New Hampshire to campaign as surrogates for Hillary Rodham Clinton.

Govs. Dannel Malloy of Connecticut and Peter Shumlin of Vermont are traveling the state Monday to promote Clinton's candidacy. Shumlin will focus specifically on Clinton's recently released plan on college debt and affordability as he campaigns in Hanover, Claremont, Peterborough and Portsmouth.

Courtesy of Facebook

 

Republican presidential contender Jeb Bush is defending his use of the term "anchor babies" on a talk radio show to describe children born to immigrants living illegally in the United States.

He says he supports the concept of birthright citizenship.

Asked by reporters Thursday if he thinks the term is offensive, Bush simply said "no." He became defensive when pressed, saying "you give me a better term and I'll use it."

Bush's comments come as Donald Trump, who is leading the GOP field, is calling for an end to birthright citizenship.

Joe Shlabotnik/flickr

 

Portsmouth residents and business owners are being asked to conserve water.

Brian Goetz, the deputy public works director, tells the Portsmouth Herald a control valve at a water treatment plant in Madbury failed during a thunderstorm Tuesday night, reducing water production by a third.

construction-institute.org

 

New Hampshire Gov. Maggie Hassan plans to nominate a Massachusetts transportation official to become commissioner of the same agency in her state.

Hassan announced Wednesday that she will nominate Victoria Sheehan to lead New Hampshire's Department of Transportation.

File photo

The Hannaford supermarket chain is settling a dispute with the federal Department of Labor with a promise to institute new worker protection standards at two distribution centers.

The labor department's Occupational Safety and Health Administration cited Hannaford for failing to keep distribution centers in Schodack Landing, New York, and South Portland, Maine, free from hazards that can cause disorders of the muscular and skeletal systems. The citation came after inspections in 2013 and 2014.

Mark via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/8mdNZs

Town officials are moving forward with new guidelines for a medical marijuana dispensary and cultivation center in Merrimack.

The Telegraph of Nashua reports Merrimack officials said Tuesday evening that a licensed company is interested in putting a dispensary in the town.

Town officials unanimously granted initial approval on new rules requiring dispensaries be 1,000 feet away from schools. Police must also review their floor-plans and security measures.

Wikipedia

 

Authorities in New Hampshire say they've found insufficient evidence to charge a Dartmouth College fraternity accused of branding new members.

Alpha Delta, which partly inspired the 1978 movie "Animal House," lost its status as a student organization in April after a string of disciplinary violations including hazing and underage service of alcohol.

Manchester Police Department

 

Authorities say a 32-year-old man has been arrested in connection with the shooting death of a man found in a Manchester apartment.

Police responding to a report of a shooting found the body of 44-year-old Raymond Drake shortly after 4 a.m. Tuesday. He'd been shot several times. An autopsy is to be performed.

Drew Morris of Manchester has been charged with second-degree murder. He is to be arraigned Wednesday morning in district court. It wasn't immediately known if he has a lawyer.

flickr/Virginia Department of Transportation

 

It's been 10 years since New Hampshire started its E-ZPass electronic tolling system, and some of the oldest transponders are nearing the end of their battery life.

Customers with transponders that are at least nine years old are being asked to check their account statements. If their license plate numbers are listed instead of their transponder numbers, the transponder isn't working.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

The city of Somersworth is trying to restrict panhandling.

Foster's Daily Democrat reports the Somersworth City Council passed an ordinance Monday stating that people are no longer allowed to give or receive items from vehicle occupants on roadways.

Both the panhandler and drivers could be fined up to $500.

Councilor David Witham said residents have expressed fear and frustration about aggressive panhandlers on the roadways. He insisted it is a safety issue.

 

New Hampshire politicians were quick to praise a new White House initiative to combat heroin use and trafficking.

Amid a spike in heroin use and deaths across the country, the Obama administration on Monday announced $5 million initiative focused on states along the East Coast.

Kate Harper for NHPR

 

The heavily funded super PAC backing Republican Jeb Bush will spend at least $10 million on television time in the earliest voting presidential primary states, the first salvo in a massive TV ad campaign to support the former Florida governor’s bid for the Republican nomination.

Wikipedia

 

Jury selection is set to begin in the trial of a Vermont man prosecutors say raped a 15-year-old freshman two days before he graduated from the prestigious St. Paul's School in New Hampshire.

Owen Labrie, now 19, of Tunbridge, Vermont, has pleaded not guilty to multiple felony charges including forcible rape.

Prosecutors say the girl tried unsuccessfully to resist his attempts at intercourse in a building on the school's Concord campus on May 30, 2014.

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