Associated Press

The U.S Army Corps of Engineers has agreed to pay $85,000 to settle EPA claims that it violated regulations in its handling of a hazardous chemical at the Army's Cold Regions Research and Engineering Lab in Hanover.

The EPA alleged that the Corps didn't comply with "Risk Management Plan" regulations in the federal Clean Air Act in its handling of anhydrous ammonia.

City of Portsmouth


The Portsmouth Police Commission has failed to endorse an agreement that would allow the city's police chief to continue working for another three months.

Chief Stephen DuBois announced in September that he was going to resign. The original agreement debated Monday would've ended his employment in March 2016. The new agreement would've accepted the chief's resignation in January and included an additional three months of severance pay.

The Commission split a vote endorsing the agreement Wednesday and voted to continue it until Oct. 20.

Credit mikecogh via Flickr Creative Commons


A transgender woman has dropped a federal lawsuit against the Rockingham County claiming she suffered injuries after being classified as a man while an inmate.

Aja Kennedy, formerly known as Edward Brunetta, withdrew the suit from federal court in New Hampshire. She had claimed she was harassed and sexually assaulted while incarcerated at the Rockingham County jail in Brentwood.

The Portsmouth Herald reports Rockingham County attorneys said Wednesday the case was dropped without a settlement and that they had a "very good defense."


A survey of New Hampshire residents shows that they are willing to pay more for locally grown fruits and vegetables, but they may not always know where to find it.

Two hundred people were surveyed for the University of New Hampshire study, which said residents spend about 21 percent of their grocery budget on fresh produce. They're willing to pay more for items such as local green beans and cucumbers, though fewer are willing to pay more for organic green beans and cucumbers.

NHPR Staff

The fate of a unique industrial building in New Hampshire could be decided soon.

The 1888 Concord gasholder is believed to be the last of its kind in the United States with its interior works intact. Retired state architectural historian Jim Garvin says gasholders changed America. The new lighting fuel technology meant businesses could run three shifts and people could read, gather and walk the streets deep into the night.

Susan Strickler, the director and CEO of the Currier Museum in Manchester since 1996, is retiring next June.

Under her guidance, the museum gained more than 33,000 square feet of space and added two large communal areas.

The museum has expanded its holdings of photography, prints and decorative arts, initiated a collection of craft and added major paintings and sculpture.

Via Glassdoor

The state attorney general says about 21,000 New Hampshire residents who are T-Mobile wireless customers may have had personal data exposed in the recent breach at the Experian credit reporting agency.

According to the attorney general's office, data was used by T-Mobile in credit checks of applicants for its services from Sept. 1, 2013 through Sept. 16, 2015.

It included names, addresses, birth dates, Social Security numbers and other identification.

Kim Carpenter via Flickr CC

Heating bills should drop this winter for most U.S. households, thanks to a combination of lower energy prices and warmer weather across most of the country.

The U.S. Energy Department's annual prediction Tuesday calls for lower energy costs than the past two winters.

It says the biggest savings should be for those using propane or heating oil, with homes that use propane spending $322 less and those with heating oil spending $459 less than last winter.

A federal judge has ruled against a former state employee who claimed she was fired from the Department of Health and Human Services for trying to breast-feed her child during the workday.

The Concord Monitor reports a judge ruled last month that Katherine Frederick was provided breaks and a private place to express milk, as required by law. The judge called the Department's policy "stingy," but noted it didn't violate any laws by refusing to let her breastfeed either in the lactation room or a short distance away.

Kate Harper for NHPR


Democrat presidential hopeful Hillary Rodham Clinton is returning to New Hampshire to talk about early childhood education.

Clinton is hosting a town hall at Manchester Community College on Monday morning and participating in an afternoon conference on early childhood education. She'll also join the Today Show for a town hall moderated by host Savannah Guthrie in New Hampshire.


The federal government has denied Concord's request to use a modified wheelchair icon intended to empower and welcome people with disabilities.

The Accessible Icon Project began in 2010 in Cambridge, Massachusetts as a guerrilla art campaign. The wheelchair user depicted in the icon leans forward instead of straight up.

Concord sent a letter to the Federal Highway Administration in August asking permission to use the symbol on Main Street. The city received a $4.71 million grant for a Main Street project from the federal agency and needed their approval.

NHPR Staff

Preliminary numbers show New Hampshire closing the books on the 2015 budget with a $73 million surplus, far greater than what was expected.

During the budget writing phase, Gov. Maggie Hassan's office criticized lawmakers for counting on rolling nearly $50 million in surplus into the next budget.

Hassan's office says the surplus will help strengthen the state's rainy day fund and improve the state's financial outlook. She says the Legislature should consider using some of the money to address public school funding concerns.


A federal agency says new fishermen costs have been pushed back a month.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said over the summer that fishermen would have to begin paying about $700 a day for nearly a quarter of their fishing days beginning on Nov. 1. That money would pay for the at-sea monitoring of fishermen, which is currently covered by the agency.

The Portsmouth Herald reports a spokeswoman says the deadline has now been postponed to Dec. 1.

Fishermen have said the costs are too high, as they don't gross $700 in a single day.


The New Hampshire Secretary of State's Office says the filing period for the 2016 presidential primary will start Wednesday, Nov. 4.

The filing starts the day after cities across the state hold their city elections.

The filing period will continue until Friday, Nov. 20.

The office will be open from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., except for Veteran's Day, which is Nov. 11. The office will be open until 5 p.m. on the last day of filing.

Candidates who wish to file on the last day must do so in person.

Chris Jensen for NHPR


New Hampshire Senator Kelly Ayotte is boldly taking on a role most of her fellow Republicans have disdained: public foil to Republican presidential candidate Ted Cruz.

Readying for what could be a tough re-election bid in an increasingly swing state, Ayotte has challenged the Texas senator as he has pushed for a government shutdown over funds for Planned Parenthood.

Camil Tulcan/flickr


The National Weather Service says much of New Hampshire is under a flood warning or a flood watch as heavy rain makes its way across the state.

Rainfall totals were approaching 4 inches in Keene on Wednesday morning. Another inch or two was possible.

State police are reporting some hydroplaning-related accidents and there are some scattered power outages.

The heaviest rain was expected to taper off, starting with the southern part of the state late Wednesday morning.

Flikr Creative Commons / Brave Sir Robin


Dartmouth College officials have unveiled a reorganization plan for the Geisel School of Medicine designed to reduce the school's sizable annual structural deficit.

The Valley News reports Geisel had operating expenses of $250 million in the fiscal year that ended on June 30.

While the medical school is part of Dartmouth, it receives some financial support from the college's medical system affiliate, Dartmouth-Hitchcock.

Interim Dean Duane Compton says revenue streams that historically supported medical schools have evened out in recent years.

col&tasha, Flickr


The state Public Utilities Commission has fined Eversource $250,000 for failing to repair a broken arm on a utility pole in Keene, where a Keene State College employee was electrocuted while investigating a report of a low-hanging wire. The utility has a right to a hearing.

The PUC released its order Friday regarding the April 2014 death of Nathan DeMond. It said he was found in contact with the wire, which had detached from a pole's cross arm and sagged close to the ground.

Manchester Police Department

  A 25-year-old Manchester mother has waived arraignment on a murder charge in the death of her toddler daughter.

Katlin Paquette was arrested Saturday on a second-degree murder charge, accused of recklessly causing the death of Sadence Willott. She remained jailed Monday; her lawyer filed a notice that she would not be appearing for arraignment.

Paquette is scheduled for Oct. 13 hearing.

Authorities say the 21-month-old girl suffered a fatal brain injury; the medical examiner ruled her death a homicide caused by blunt impact head injuries.

Bow Police via Facebook

An emu famous for running wild through New Hampshire for more than a week has been reunited with its owner and returned home to Vermont, perhaps after recognizing the man's jacket.

The Concord Monitor reports Kermit Blackwood figured it was a long shot that the emu loose in New Hampshire was his bird, Beatrice.

It wasn't until the Townshend, Vermont, resident traveled roughly 80 miles to the Henniker-based nonprofit Wings of the Dawn when he knew for sure.

Merrimack Police Department Facebook page


Police in Merrimack are providing two parking spaces in the front of the police station designed for child custody exchanges or for those completing the sale of items purchased online.

Both spaces are under 24-hour surveillance with video recording.

Police encourage the public to use the spaces when meeting an unknown person they may have purchased something online from.



A state audit shows New Hampshire's food protection program is mired in inefficiencies that are preventing the timely inspection of establishments that sell and produce food.

A legislative committee will discuss the audit at a meeting Friday after hearing a presentation by state auditors. The audit says many of the state's procedures are ineffective and may be leading to an increase in foodborne illnesses. It also finds that a number of high risk food establishments are not being inspected in a timely fashion.

Portsmouth Police Department

  Police in Portsmouth have created a public service announcement video they hope will help the community fight heroin abuse.

The video, called "It's Time, Let's Talk," is aimed at breaking the stigma that comes with substance abuse and urging people to ask for help.

You can watch the video here.

Officials say it highlights that combating substance abuse is a complex medical issue and not simply a criminal matter, and that fighting it will take a collected effort.

Ian Sane via flickr


New Hampshire's Fish and Game Department is scheduled to hold the first of several public hearings on proposed increases in hunting and fishing license fees.

The first is scheduled for 6:30 p.m. Thursday at the Fish and Game office in Lancaster.

Under the proposal, resident freshwater fishing licenses would go from $33 to $43; hunting licenses from $21 to $31; and combination hunting/fishing from $44 to $54. Annual hunting and fishing permit fees for non-residents would also increase by $10. One, three and seven-day fishing permit fees would not change.

SuperFantastic / Flickr Creative Commons


New Hampshire health officials say a survey of independent pharmacies shows most don't sell tobacco products.

The telephone survey — conducted in August — polled 33 independent pharmacies. Health officials say 27 replied that they do not.

Marcella Bobinsky, acting director of public health at the Department of Health and Human Services, says she applauds those pharmacies for recognizing the conflict of stores that deal in health care and pharmaceutical products selling a product that kills an estimated 1,900 New Hampshire residents yearly.

House Democratic Leader Stephen Shurtleff will be among the dignitaries at a ceremony Wednesday welcoming Pope Francis to the White House.

Shurtleff is among the invited guests to join President Barack Obama at today’s ceremony.

Francis plans to deliver his opening remarks to the United States in an arrival ceremony today on the White House lawn. Then he's expected to speak to America's bishops.

Shurtleff says as a Roman Catholic, he has tremendous respect for the positions Pope Francis has taken on social and environmental issues.

Daniel S. Hurd


With a battle looming over Medicaid expansion, supporters say the state's ability to tackle the drug abuse crisis will suffer if the program ends.

More than 40,000 people are insured under the Medicaid expansion program, which began in 2014. Unlike traditional Medicaid, it covers substance abuse treatment and recovery programs. But the program is set to expire at the end of 2016 if lawmakers fail to reauthorize it.



Attorneys say a fired Portsmouth police officer will not appeal after being stripped of most of a $2 million inheritance from a woman's disputed will.

The Portsmouth Herald reports the judge says it hasn't been determined if Geraldine Webber's 2009 will should stand. He dismissed her 2012 will and trust last month, saying former police Sgt. Aaron Goodwin acted on Webber's "fears and hopes" to extract her inheritance, which included a waterfront home, Cadillac, stocks and bonds.


Data released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention rank Vermont sixth best in the nation overall in its adult obesity rate.

The report from the Trust for America's Health ranks New Hampshire as the 15th best in the nation and Maine as 19th best.

Hawaii had the nation's lowest rates at 22.1 percent. Colorado, the District of Columbia, Massachusetts, and California also had lower rates than Vermont.

Manchester School District


A preschool teacher in Manchester has been named the 2016 New Hampshire Teacher of the Year.

Ashley Preston, who teaches at Parker Varney Elementary School, becomes the state's candidate for National Teacher of the Year.

Preston has been teaching for nine years, all of them in the Manchester School District. The Department of Education says the selection committee recognized her ability to help her students be curious, critical thinkers and problem solvers.