Associated Press

Allegra Boverman / NHPR


New Hampshire Congresswoman Annie Kuster has returned from a trip with other House members to Afghanistan and Kuwait, which included spending Thanksgiving with U.S. troops.

Kuster, a Democrat and member of the House Veterans Affairs Committee, was one of six representatives receiving in-country updates on security, political transitions, and counter-terrorism initiatives.


A small hospital in Wolfeboro is exploring an affiliation with a much larger medical center in Manchester.

The governing boards at Huggins Hospital and Catholic Medical Center have approved a non-binding letter of intent to pursue an affiliation. Huggins Hospital has 25 beds and 400 employees, while CMC has 330 beds with 2,500 employees.

NHPR Staff


A panel of lawmakers will meet in Concord as part of a legislative task force formed to address the state's growing heroin abuse crisis.

The finance and appropriations panel of the task force is set to meet Tuesday at the State House.


Sen. Marco Rubio of Florida says radical jihadists are using the refugee crisis as a cover to send terrorists to the West and that it's impossible for the United States to vet some Syrian migrants.

A Planned Parenthood clinic in New Hampshire has reopened nearly six weeks after police say it was badly damaged by a hatchet-wielding juvenile.

The Claremont clinic reopened Monday, three days after police in Colorado Springs, Colorado, said a man opened fire on a Planned Parenthood clinic there, killing a police officer and two civilians.

In New Hampshire, Claremont Police Chief Alexander Scott says officers are cognizant of what happened and are keeping an extra eye on the facility. He says the clinic has installed internal security upgrades since the Oct. 21 vandalism.


Keene State College is getting national recognition for its efforts to reduce food waste.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency recently honored 14 organizations in a variety of categories. Keene State won an award for the best educational and outreach campaign.

The campaign involves performing regular food audits, brining experts on the topic to campus and having a "spokesvegetable," the Carrot, which is displayed across campus with facts about preventing food waste.


The Portsmouth City Council is considering a change to its trash and recyclable collection times in the city's historic downtown district amid growing concerns.

Recycling and solid waste coordinator Jacob Levenson tells the Portsmouth Herald that afternoon collection times for the downtown area has caused issues for both businesses and residents.

A survey conducted by the Department of Public Works showed that residents overwhelmingly prefer a morning pickup, with businesses supporting collections closer to the evening.

NHPR Staff


Hillary Rodham Clinton unveiled the first piece of a new jobs agenda on Sunday, promising hundreds of billions of dollars in fresh federal spending in an effort to compete with the liberal economic policies of her primary challengers.


Presidential campaigning is back in full post-Thanksgiving swing in New Hampshire, with former Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley, Florida Sen. Marco Rubio and New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie heading to the state for events.

O'Malley kicks off Monday with a tour of Velcro Companies in Manchester. He'll then host a town hall in North Conway and a meet-and-greet in the late afternoon in Somersworth. O'Malley's 3-stop tour comes after his speech Sunday night at the state Democratic party's annual dinner.


The Hilltop School in Somersworth has been named to the National Register of Historic Places.

Its predecessor was Great Falls High School, the first public high school in New Hampshire constructed in 1849 after a law that cleared the way for municipalities to develop centralized school districts and build schools.

By the 1920s, that building was in disrepair. The school board secured funding for a new school.

Sara Plourde for NHPR

New Hampshire's Department of Health and Human Services has proposed a policy that would increase Medicaid and Medicare reimbursement rates for qualified rural clinics that have a shortage of doctors.

The policy also would create the potential for more providers to receive federal and state loan repayment for underserved areas and drive patients to primary care instead of hospitals.

It's called a Governor-Designated and Secretary-Certified shortage area.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Hillary Rodham Clinton says her use of the term "illegal immigrants" was a "poor choice of words" and she's pledging not to use it anymore.

Clinton was asked about her use of the term to describe people who are in the U.S. illegally during a question-and-answer session Tuesday on Facebook held by Telemundo.

During a stop in New Hampshire earlier this month, the Democratic presidential candidate referred to immigrants that way while discussing her support for a barrier along the Mexican border as a New York senator.

Flickr Creative Commons / Brave Sir Robin

The president of Dartmouth College has condemned reports of aggressive behavior during a Black Lives Matter protest earlier this month.

A crowd of students marched through Baker-Berry Library on Nov. 12, where demonstrators allegedly confronted other students who were studying with racially charged language. The protest occurred after a large demonstration by Dartmouth and Upper Valley residents.

The Valley News reports Dartmouth president Phil Hanlon called the community demonstration a "powerful expression of unity in support of social justice."

Tracy Lee Carroll, NHPR

New Hampshire's Ballot Law Commission is preparing to decide whether Democrat Bernie Sanders and Republicans Donald Trump and Ted Cruz are eligible for the state's presidential primary ballot.

The group meets Tuesday to take up complaints against the candidates.

The challenge against Cruz, a Texas senator, alleges he's ineligible to run for president because he was born in Canada. Cruz's mother was born in Delaware, giving him U.S. citizenship upon birth.

Police officials say the New Hampshire Police Standards and Training Council, responsible for training every law enforcement officer in the state, is in "financial crisis."

Capt. Benjamin R. Jean, PSTC support bureau commander, tells The Portsmouth Herald that there are two main reasons for the council's dire financial state.

First, Jean says, was the removal of millions of dollars from the PSTC's budget to put toward the state's general fund.

Residents in western New Hampshire are concerned that an investment in new fossil fuel infrastructure could affect environmental issues in the region.

The state Public Utilities Commission is considering bids from two utility companies - Valley Green and Liberty Utilities - that want to provide natural gas to customers in Lebanon and Hanover. The Valley News reports that both proposals would truck in natural gas to a Lebanon depot and distribute it to customers through an underground distribution pipeline.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

U.S. Sen. Jeanne Shaheen is proposing $600 million in emergency funding to address the nation's opioid and heroin abuse crisis.

The bulk of the money would go to the Department of Health and Human Services, including $250 million that would be distributed to states as block grants for prevention, treatment and recovery programs. Another $200 million would go to the Department of Justice for grants that fund programs focused on law enforcement, courts and education.

Allegra Boverman / NHPR


Gov. Maggie Hassan has asked the U.S. Department of Energy to reschedule public hearings currently planned for December on the proposed Northern Pass project.

The hearings on a draft environmental report on the project also gave the public until Dec. 31 to comment.

Hartford, Connecticut-based Eversource has proposed a 192-mile transmission line from Pittsburg to Deerfield, carrying 1,090 megawatts of hydro-power produced by Canada's biggest hydro generator, HydroQuebec. It filed an application with the state Site Evaluation Committee last month.

Kate Harper for NHPR


New Hampshire's largest public employee labor union is backing Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders in the Democratic presidential primary, bucking its national affiliate's endorsement of Hillary Clinton.

The State Employees' Association/SEIU Local 1984 represents 11,500 workers across New Hampshire. President Richard Gulla says the chapter is backing Sanders because of his support for maintaining retirement benefits, lowering college costs, better wages for workers and his willingness to take on Wall Street.

Manchester Police Department


A Los Angeles Kings goaltending prospect has been accused in New Hampshire of 12 domestic-related charges involving his girlfriend, including a felony assault charge alleging that he tried to strangle her at an apartment.

Patrik Bartosak played for the American Hockey League's Manchester Monarchs for two seasons. He moved with the Kings farm team, now called the Ontario Reign, to California. He was re-assigned Friday to the East Coast Hockey League's Manchester Monarchs.

usdagov via Flickr CC


New Hampshire education officials have received permission to replace the 11th grade statewide assessment test with the College Board's SAT exam next spring.

The Executive Council on Wednesday approved the Department of Education's request to offer the SAT at no cost for all 11th-graders. The SAT, widely used by colleges in evaluating applicants, typically costs more than $50.


Dartmouth College faculty has taken an advisory vote in favor of creating an independent graduate school.

The Valley News reports college President Phil Hanlon yesterday advocated forming a School of Graduate and Advanced Studies. Faculty members approved the measure.

Hanlon says the school would help advance Dartmouth's profile in research. Arts and Sciences Dean Michael Mastanduno says the move would correct a "historical anomaly" in the college's organization.

Chris Jensen for NHPR


U.S. Sen. Kelly Ayotte says New Hampshire is getting more help in prosecuting drug traffickers.

Ayotte says she has secured a commitment from the Drug Enforcement Administration to create a federally-funded, full-time position in the U.S. attorney's office to enhance efforts to prosecute drug traffickers. Ayotte, a Republican, had written a letter to Department of Justice officials in October requesting funding for the position.



Authorities have continued their search for a New Hampshire college student who has been missing since last week.

Authorities say Plymouth State University student Jake Nawn went missing near a river at around 4 p.m. Thursday. The 23-year-old Holden, Massachusetts man was reportedly last seen near the Common Man Inn in Plymouth. Crews continued searching for him on Sunday.

Police, Fish and Game officials and the New England K-9 Search and Rescue are all involved in the search efforts.

(Debra Cameron/Conway Area Humane Society via AP)


Animal rights activists in New Hampshire are pushing to ban the practice of shooting a pet that is sick, injured or dangerous after a dog was found shot to death.

Bruno was an 18-month-old mixed breed who was shot four times in September. His owner says the dog had bitten his children.

Katie Treamer, who helped found Justice For Bruno, says Bruno could have been returned to the shelter where he was adopted. She says if the dog was truly dangerous, then a veterinarian could have euthanized Bruno more humanely.

Manchester-Boston Regional Airport Tower
J. Stephen Conn / Flickr Creative Commons


Officials at New Hampshire's major airport say employees are on heightened alert in the aftermath of the deadly attacks in Paris.

Manchester-Boston Regional Airport Assistant Director Thomas Malafronte told WMUR-TV that all employees and tenants have been told to remain on a heightened level of awareness after gun and bomb attacks in Paris Friday killed at least 129 people.

Malafronte says the heightened security protocols should not affect the travelling public.

Appleswitch via Flickr Creative Commons


The New Hampshire Attorney General's Office is investigating the injuries of an 11-month-old boy who died over the weekend.

Authorities received a report of an injured child in Alexandria on Friday. State and local police were investigating at a house on Fowler River Road throughout the weekend.

Authorities say the boy died Sunday. His death has been described as suspicious.

Details about how the child died haven't been released. Authorities say an autopsy is scheduled for Tuesday.


A former Seabrook police officer caught on video slamming a suspect into a wall in 2009 has been sentenced to 21 days in jail.

The Portsmouth Herald reports a judge on Thursday ordered Mark Richardson to serve 12 months with all but 21 days suspended for two years.

Richardson pleaded guilty in October to a charge of simple assault. He was charged last year after video surfaced showing him pushing Michael Bergeron Jr. into a wall at the Seabrook Police Station.


Three information centers that welcome tourists to New Hampshire will once again be open during the winter.

The state welcome and information centers in Colebrook, Lebanon and Littleton have been closed during the winter since 2011. But the Department of Resources and Economic Development says based on the recently signed state budget and efforts to improve agency efficiency, officials found money to re-open the centers.

The three sites will open from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Thursday through Monday from Dec. 17 to March 21.


Police say the death of a 17-year-old girl found in a Rochester motel room was drug-related, and her mother and two others were arrested.

Evangelique "Eve" Tarmey of Rochester was found at the Riviera Motel on Oct. 17.

Police said Thursday a toxicology report said the Spaulding High School student's death was accidental and due to "acute fentanyl intoxication."

Her mother, 41-year-old Jazzmyn Rood, was arrested on charges of conspiracy to commit possession of a controlled drug, endangering the welfare of a child, and reckless conduct.