Ben Henry

News Intern, All Things Considered

Ben Henry is a science journalist and intern for All Things Considered on NHPR. Previously, he was a reporter for The Scientist magazine, where he wrote print stories and created a podcast. He earned a degree in biology and a minor in English literature from Middlebury College. 

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Currier Museum of Art

Outside the Currier Museum this Saturday evening, you’ll find live music, chalk drawing, face painting, and something called an “art battle.” Five food trucks will line the streets, and when twilight sets in, a parade will start.

The museum is hosting an event called "Twilight at the Currier."

It's part of a new focus by the museum on community engagement. Karen Graham, the Currier's deputy director, says the museum has been looking for more ways to have people visit in a casual setting.

Wikimedia Commons

The New Hampshire Department of Transportation and its counterpart in Vermont are considering repairs to a bridge between the two states that’s been closed since 2009. The Vilas Bridge was built in 1930 and stretches over the Connecticut River between North Walpole, N.H. and Bellows Falls, Vt.

Wikimedia Commons

NASCAR is back in New Hampshire this weekend. Races will be held Saturday and Sunday at the New Hampshire Motor Speedway in Loudon, where a hundred thousand fans are expected to watch some of the country’s top NASCAR drivers burn rubber.

Drivers are entering the second half of their race season, and they’ll find themselves on an unforgiving track here in New Hampshire.

Photo courtesy of Chris Connors

Residents of Warner and surroundings towns have requested to place the Warner River under a state environmental protection program. 

The Warner River is a favorite location for trout fisherman and kayakers. Joining New Hampshire's River Management and Protection Program would mean that people who live near the river will have a say in conserving it.

Wikimedia Commons

The “Climb to the Clouds” road race will take place on the slopes of Mount Washington this weekend. All eyes will be on David Higgins, a rally driver who holds the record for fastest time up the Mount Washington Auto Road—a blistering 6 minutes and 9 seconds, over 70 miles an hour on average.

The New Hampshire Union Leader has disabled the comments section on its website.

The paper’s president, Brendan McQuaid, said that responding to complaints and at times removing comments was taking up too much of the staff's time. 

Behind a cracked parking lot and below a yellowed sign sits the Hill Village Store. It’s right off the single road that cuts through Hill, New Hampshire, and it's the only store in town that sells food.

This week, after 17 years under one owner, it's closing and going up for sale. For Foodstuffs, our regular look at food and food culture in New Hampshire, NHPR’s Ben Henry went to Hill to find out what the loss of the store means for the town.

apasciuto via Flickr cc

The New England Fishery Management Council is asking the Trump Administration to slow its push for offshore oil and gas developments on the East Coast. (Scroll down to read the letter sent by the organization to the Department of the Interior.)

An Executive Order signed in April urges oil exploration in the mid and south Atlantic. Currently, five companies are seeking permits to conduct what are called seismic surveys in these areas. 

Ben Henry

In a plant-filled apartment in Lebanon during the heat wave this week, Helen Brody drank iced tea and recalled the rise and fall of the New Hampshire Farms Network (NHFN). She launched the website in 2008, to nurture local food culture at a time when “local food” was barely a thing.

For the past decade, the NHFN website had been a source of in-depth profiles on New Hampshire farmers and their families. This April, it closed down, although the New Hampshire Historical Society recently made plans to acquire the profiles.

Sharon Sinclair, Flickr

A 24-hour donation drive for New Hampshire’s nonprofits kicks off tonight. More than 350 nonprofits are taking part in the day-long event, called NH Gives.

The very first NH Gives took place last year, raising $188,000. Much of that went to small organizations that lack the infrastructure to launch large-scale fundraising efforts of their own.

Amy Quinton, NHPR

New Hampshire imports all of its fossil fuels, meaning a lot of money leaves the state to keep our lights on. Local clean energy companies want to change that, by transitioning to renewable sources like solar and biomass. 

Congresswoman Annie Kuster expressed support Monday for New Hampshire’s green energy economy  and opposition to Donald Trump’s withdrawal from the Paris Climate Accord. Speaking in Peterborough alongside clean energy advocates, Kuster said the state should stay committed to the goals of the Paris agreement and invest in New Hampshire energy.

The Otter, Flickr

By the end of this century, scientists predict the ocean on New Hampshire’s coast will rise anywhere between 4 and 6.5 feet above where it is today—a consequence of climate change. But when the sea rises, groundwater rises to keep up. That would spell trouble for roadways, even roads inland from the ocean, according to a new study from UNH.

Chevrolet

Electric vehicles are not quite mainstream yet, but the price of one model, the Chevy Bolt, is dropping to an accessible range. Concord Monitor columnist David Brooks was lucky enough to test drive one, and wrote this week that there’s a learning curve for driving these cars. He spoke with NHPR’s Peter Biello about the experience.

About that learning curve—what exactly would we have to unlearn as drivers in order to learn how to drive electric cars?

Paul Lally

New Hampshire is home to the long-running cooking show Ciao Italia. The program is produced in Dover and has aired on public television stations nationwide since 1989. 

At a recent taping of the show in Windham, a television crew transforms a kitchen into a television set. They erect umbrella-shaped lights, while a woman standing nearby introduces herself as Mary Ann Esposito, the show's host.

Scientists who study the environment keep track of the number and variety of plants and animals in a region—they call that biodiversity. Studies show biodiversity is plummeting worldwide due to human activity, and understanding why biodiversity matters now could help us stop the loss.

NHPR’s Peter Biello spoke with David Brooks, who writes the Granite Geek column for the Concord Monitor, about the importance of biodiversity.

In your column, you make an analogy between biodiversity and capitalism. Can you elaborate on that?

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

The sun is out—but ticks are too. The New Hampshire Department of Health and Human Services is reminding people to take precautions against getting bitten. 

The tiny parasites can be as small as a poppy seed and they like to hang out in tall grass or loose brush. “Ticks are out and biting," says state epidemiologist Benjamin Chan. "In fact, we tend to see tick bites start to go up in April and become more prominent in May, so now is a high-risk time where people can get bitten."

Ben Henry

Healthcare professionals on Friday expressed concerns to Senator Jeanne Shaheen that healthcare reform will hurt New Hampshire's veterans.

The panel of experts and veterans said the American Health Care Act would weaken support veterans receive for physical disabilities, PTSD, and substance abuse treatment. Cutting funds now will only lead to costlier treatments down the road, panelists worried. 

In light of these concerns, Shaheen said Congress shouldn’t try to repeal the Affordable Care Act, but fix the parts that aren’t working.

The New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services on Wednesday released a set of annual reports on the health of New Hampshire’s lakes. The reports offer information on the water quality and plant and animal life of almost every lake in New Hampshire.

State biologist Kirsten Nelson says the information is intended for residents, so they can stay informed about the health of their environment.

Peter Biello

The Log Cabin Republicans have long had a national presence, and now they have a New Hampshire chapter. The group of conservative supporters of LGBT rights formed last month and will hold a launch event on Friday at 5:30pm at the One Hundred Club in Portsmouth, during which Governor Chris Sununu is scheduled to speak. It’s an effort, they say, to show that the Republican party is unified.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

When President Donald Trump dismissed FBI Director James Comey yesterday, critics immediately drew comparisons to an incident during Richard Nixon’s presidency known as the Saturday Night Massacre. That’s when Nixon fired a special prosecutor investigating the Watergate break-in, leading to high-level resignations and a constitutional crisis.

NHPR’s Peter Biello discussed the lessons and limitations of this comparison with Tim Naftali, a professor of history at NYU and former director of the Richard Nixon Presidential Library.

Bev Conway

Last week, Concord-based photographer and filmmaker Gary Samson was named New Hampshire’s Artist Laureate. Samson built his career exploring the history and culture of the Granite State. He now serves as Chair of Photography at the New Hampshire Institute of Art. Samson reflected on his approach to photography with NHPR’s Peter Biello.