Casey McDermott

State of Democracy/Health Reporter

Credit John W. Hession

Casey McDermott is a reporter covering politics, policy and healthcare.

Prior to joining NHPR, Casey worked at The Concord Monitor and held internships at ProPublica, the Student Press Law Center and the Chronicle of Higher Education. 

She studied journalism and sociology at Penn State but spent most of her days (and nights) in the newsroom of the independent student newspaper, The Daily Collegian. The Collegian was recognized nationally for its work during Casey's time as its managing editor and editor-in-chief.

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This year’s relatively warm and dry winter probably didn’t do New Hampshire any favors when it comes to curbing its tick population — so people should continue to be vigilant in screening for the invasive insects.

“Evidence suggests that they kind of survived the winter pretty well,” UNH Cooperative Extension Entomologist and Integrated Pest Management Specialist Alan Eaton said on Wednesday’s edition of The Exchange

Mark via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/8mdNZs

New Hampshire’s third medical marijuana dispensary opened Sunday in Lebanon.

Temescal Wellness, the company operating the dispensary, opened up another dispensary in Dover a little over a week ago. 

It was a good week for bees, a less-good week for trees. Here’s what else you might’ve missed along the way.Want to catch up a bit earlier on the headlines? Sign up for our Friday news email, The Rundown, and get it delivered right to your inbox. Here's the link.

In case you weren't paying close attention to the headlines this week, here are some interesting things you might've missed. Want to catch up a bit earlier on the headlines? Sign up for our Friday news email, The Rundown, and get it delivered right to your inbox. Here's the link.

Why haven’t more of the state’s doctors stepped up to fight on the front lines of addiction?

Allegra Boverman, NHPR

Democracy for America, one of the nation’s largest grassroots progressive organizations, is backing Democrat Colin Van Ostern in the race for governor — the group’s first gubernatorial endorsement of the 2016 election cycle.

Wikimedia Commons

 Less than a week after New Hampshire’s first medical marijuana dispensary opened in Plymouth, another is poised to open on Thursday in Dover.

The Department of Health and Human Services has officially certified Temescal Wellness, which was selected to operate two of the state's New Hampshire’s four medical marijuana dispensaries, to start serving patients at its Dover location. The company says it plans to open its doors at noon on Thursday.

Pam Tucker for US Congress, YouTube

The previously crowded Republican primary for New Hampshire's First Congressional District shrunk yet again on Monday, as State Rep. Pam Tucker announced plans to suspend her campaign.

Casey McDermott, NHPR

By the time Sanctuary ATC opened its doors in Plymouth — around 11 a.m. Saturday morning — about a dozen people were already huddled around on the porch or hanging out in the parking lot outside, hoping to get in.

The state gave the medical marijuana dispensary the green light to open Friday afternoon. And by the end of its first day, the dispensary ended up served 45 people in all, according to its director.

Happy Friday! Here's some interesting stuff you might've missed this week. Want to catch up a bit earlier on the headlines? Sign up for our Friday news email, The Rundown, and get it delivered right to your inbox. Here's the link.

Friendly reminder: (Still? Only?) 137 days ‘til the state primaries

And if this week’s any indication, it’s not going to be pretty.

Dank Depot via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/9c93J6

It’s official: Nearly three years after the state legalized medical marijuana, New Hampshire’s first dispensary will start serving patients Saturday morning in Plymouth.

Paige Sutherland/NHPR

CVS Health is the latest pharmacy chain to offer the overdose reversal drug naloxone, known commonly as Narcan, at its stores in New Hampshire. 

Casey McDermott, NHPR

This Saturday marked what’s believed to be the 400th anniversary of William Shakespeare’s death.

But it was also thought to have been his 452nd birthday — and over at Saint Anselm College, a group of students, professors and others turned out to honor the playwright and poet in the best way possible, with a daylong reading of his work. (There was also, of course, plenty of birthday cake.)

Each week, we're scanning news sources across the state for the interesting stuff that got people talking in New Hampshire — even if you might've missed it.

Want to catch up a bit earlier on the headlines? Sign up for our Friday news email, The Rundown, and get it delivered right to your inbox. Here's the link.

Paige Sutherland/NHPR

Manchester accounted for nearly a quarter of the fatal drug overdoses reported across New Hampshire last year, according to newly released data from the medical examiner’s office.

The state's largest city saw 106 overdoses last year, out of a statewide total of 433.

Paige Sutherland/NHPR

Last year saw more drug overdose deaths than ever before in New Hampshire.

So far in 2016, the state’s confirmed at least 48 deaths, with another 89 potential cases on top of that — officials are waiting for more toxicology reports to add those into the total.

The death toll, however, only tells part of the story of the opioid crisis in New Hampshire.

Count Sen. Jeanne Shaheen among those cheering the news that Harriet Tubman will replace Andrew Jackson on the front of the $20 bill.

For the last year, Shaheen has been one of the leading voices in Congress calling for more female representation on U.S. currency.

Amanda Loder, StateImpact New Hampshire

It seems like a simple question: Overall, have free-trade agreements (like NAFTA) been good news or bad news for the Granite State?

The answer, according to the experts and others who weighed in during The Exchange, isn’t so straightforward.

NHPR Staff

Sure, the prospect of being a delegate to a national political convention has always been a big deal — but it's usually also kind of a formality.

By the time a convention rolls around, parties typically know who’s gathered enough support to earn the nomination, according to whatever rules they’ve established in advance.

Not so in 2016.

Sam Evans-Brown, NHPR

Each week, NHPR's Casey McDermott rounds up the stories that made news in New Hampshire.

Want to catch up a bit earlier on the headlines you might have missed? Sign up for our Friday news email, The Rundown, and get it delivered right to your inbox. Here's the link

The bobcats (and their defenders) can breathe a big sigh of relief. 

Brady Carlson, NHPR

Childcare for infants in New Hampshire is the 12th most expensive in the nation, according to a new report from a group calling for broad reform on childcare affordability across the country.

Healthnewsnet / Flickr Creative Commons

In New Hampshire, there’s about a 5-year gap between the life expectancy for adult women at the top of the income bracket and those at the bottom. For men in the same age group, the gap’s more than nine years wide.

That's according to new data released by The Health Inequality Project, which takes a sweeping look at the relationship between income and mortality across the country.

Cheezburger.com, via GIPHY

Just catching up on this week's headlines? Here's what you might've missed.

  Above the Fold: Water worries have plenty of people on edge.

Ceyhun (Jay) Isik / https://flic.kr/p/cG7qFL

In recent weeks, confusion and unease have increased in several New Hampshire towns where contamination with the chemical PFOA has been detected in private wells.

Though the EPA has yet to determine a safe level of PFOA in drinking water, Sarah Pillsbury, the administrator for public drinking water with the New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services, is hoping that's about to change. 

Casey McDermott, NHPR

This week, Alexandria Knox got to stand shoulder-to-shoulder with one of her biggest heroes.

"Speaker Jasper," she said, "he is my inspiration."

That's Shawn Jasper, the Speaker of the New Hampshire House of Representatives. 

How does University of New Hampshire President Mark Huddleston explain the size of the school's top salaries, including his own, to students and families struggling to pay tuition?

The leader of New Hampshire’s flagship university, speaking on NHPR's The Exchange Monday, said the school needs to offer competitive rates to attract the best talent — but Huddleston maintained that the school isn’t “overpaying” in the process.

Getty Images

The battle lines on the fight over the future of New Hampshire’s Medicaid expansion are well-defined as the issue comes up for a vote in the state Senate tomorrow.

On Wednesday’s episode of The Exchange, State Sens. Jeb Bradley and Andy Sanborn — a vocal proponent and opponent of the expansion, respectively — sparred over a number of elements of the program, including its effects on the state's drug crisis.

Sara Plourde for NHPR

The question of whether to continue New Hampshire's expanded Medicaid program has been one of the top State House policy debates this year.

But it's something local governments are mulling over as well. In City Halls across the state, officials say the program has led to some significant savings: in the slice of taxpayers’ money set aside for medical and prescription aid, and indirect savings in other areas.

Casey McDermott, NHPR

James O’Keefe, a conservative activist known for his undercover videos in New Hampshire and elsewhere, marched into the State House Thursday afternoon looking to make a point about how the state enforces its voting laws.

He left with a subpoena.

Over the past few weeks, the attorney general’s office had been asking O’Keefe to preserve the raw footage from a series of videos filmed around last month's presidential primary.

At least five men and five women have died of drug overdoses in New Hampshire so far in 2016, according to the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner.

The actual number of drug deaths this year could be higher, as an additional 86 possible overdose cases are still awaiting toxicology. It can take several months for the state to fully review a suspected overdose to confirm the cause of death.

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