Casey McDermott

State of Democracy/Health Reporter

Credit John W. Hession

Casey McDermott is a reporter covering politics, policy and healthcare.

Prior to joining NHPR, Casey worked at The Concord Monitor and held internships at ProPublica, the Student Press Law Center and the Chronicle of Higher Education. 

She studied journalism and sociology at Penn State but spent most of her days (and nights) in the newsroom of the independent student newspaper, The Daily Collegian. The Collegian was recognized nationally for its work during Casey's time as its managing editor and editor-in-chief.

Casey McDermott, NHPR

At campaign stops in Henniker and Hooksett on Wednesday, Texas Senator Ted Cruz riffed heavily on his ideas for reforming Washington, directing plenty of anger at the so-called political establishment.

And in this way, the Republican presidential candidate said he’s found some common ground with Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders, one of his Democratic rivals.

Casey McDermott, NHPR

On stage at the Crossing Life Church in Windham, Texas Senator Ted Cruz told voters his first-place finish in Iowa the night before was thanks to the same kind of coalition that united behind Ronald Reagan three decades ago.

flickr by liewcf

It’s illegal to leave a prerecorded voicemail for someone on the “do not call” registry — even if the call was placed by a live caller — according to the New Hampshire Attorney General’s office.

Casey McDermott, NHPR

Newly confirmed New Hampshire Health and Human Services Commissioner Jeffrey Meyers spent part of his first official day on the job lending his support to a plan to extend the state’s Medicaid expansion another two years.

Sara Plourde for NHPR

Discussions over the future of New Hampshire’s Medicaid expansion kick off in earnest this week, setting the stage for one of the biggest policy debates before state lawmakers this year.

The question of whether to reauthorize the expansion, known officially as the New Hampshire Health Protection Program, has loomed over the State House for much of the last year.

It's a rare presidential candidate who tries to use tax policy to win voters' hearts.

But fiscal policy -- and tax reform in particular -- is an issue with the potential to have a real effect on voters’ finances, in their personal budgets or their businesses’ earnings. 

GIF created using footage from NBC

The Democratic presidential candidates could have one final chance to debate before New Hampshire voters head to the polls.

Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton was the latest presidential hopeful to stop by the NHPR offices in Concord for a candidate forum with The Exchange.

After she had a few moments to mingle with a small crowd at the building's entrance, Clinton — accompanied by a few staffers and Secret Service personnel — offered her best "elevator pitch" explaining why she's qualified to be president. 

WBUR/MassINC Polling Group

Remember those “mystifying” undeclared voters of New Hampshire everyone keeps talking about?

Well, if the results from a new WBUR poll are any indication, a good portion of this group still hasn’t settled on which party’s primary they’ll participate in – let alone which candidate they’ll end up voting for.

Kate Brindley for NHPR

The UNH Survey Center turned plenty of heads this week with its latest poll on the New Hampshire Democratic primary. The poll, conducted for WMUR and CNN, had Bernie Sanders leaping even further ahead of Hillary Clinton, now leading 60 to 33 percent.

The poll did come with a few caveats. 

Casey McDermott, NHPR

 At Dartmouth’s Tuck School of Business Monday afternoon, John Kasich made a point to emphasize his willingness to work across party lines – with a nod to one of New Hampshire’s top Democrats.

Former Democratic Governor John Lynch now works at the Tuck School where Kasich was speaking and introduced the candidate ahead of the event. Kasich, in turn, nodded to Lynch several times throughout his remarks.

CREDIT GETTY IMAGES

Legislative leaders on both sides are cheering the Senate’s passage of three bills meant to address the state’s heroin and opioid crisis.

One of the companies planning to dispense medical marijuana in New Hampshire is one step closer to offering the substance to patients.

The Department of Health and Human Services issued a conditional registration certificate to Sanctuary ATC, which plans to open a dispensary in Plymouth, to start growing medical marijuana at a designated cultivation site in Rochester.

 Less than a week after the legislative session opened, a trio of bills meant to address the state’s heroin crisis is heading for vote before the state Senate this Thursday.

The bills were vetted as part of a special task force that convened at the end of last year to focus specifically on issues related to the state's heroin and opioid crisis.

New Hampshire saw at least 385 drug deaths in 2015, according to the latest tally from the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner — but the actual total could be even higher, as some 45 cases are still pending toxicology.

Sara Plourde for NHPR

Republican leaders in the New Hampshire House and Senate say they’re willing to consider reauthorizing the state’s Medicaid expansion after its sunset date at the end of 2016 — as long as they can find someone to help foot the costs.

On Monday’s edition of The Exchange, House Speaker Shawn Jasper said it doesn’t seem politically feasible to expect him to pass a plan that requires more public spending.

This isn't the first time Carly Fiorina's had to deliver an "elevator pitch" — though, as far as she can recall, this was the first time she's had to give that pitch in an actual elevator.

NHPR Staff

Dayton Duncan, a veteran of the New Hampshire primary as both a member of the state's press and the political classes, has a friendly reminder to those who’ve been voraciously following the election for the last year or longer: “It’s still early yet.”

Carly Fiorina
Allegra Boverman for NHPR

In a conversation with NHPR’s The Exchange, Republican presidential candidate and former technology executive Carly Fiorina called for a more aggressive response when other countries wage cyberattacks on the United States.

Courtesy NH House of Representatives

New Hampshire is falling behind on several of the requirements from the landmark mental health settlement it reached in 2014, according to the latest report from an outside reviewer who’s evaluating the state’s progress.

Emily Corwin for NHPR

On Thursday morning, The Exchange will sit down for its latest in a series of conversations with presidential candidates — this time with Carly Fiorina, the former Hewlett Packard CEO seeking the Republican nomination. 

NHPR

When Nick Toumpas steps down from his role as commissioner of the Department of Health and Human Services at the end of this week, he’ll leave behind a job leading the largest state agency – and arguably its most complex – at a time when New Hampshire’s population is aging, its health needs are becoming increasingly complicated and budgets are stretched thin.

Casey McDermott, NHPR

New Hampshire’s heroin and opioid epidemic has become a front-and-center issue on the campaign trail – prompting presidential candidates from both parties to answer question after question about what they’d do to fight addiction on a national level.

Casey McDermott, NHPR

As a state task force on heroin and opioid misuse wraps up its official work, lawmakers involved say the real work is just beginning.

NHPR

 Gov. Maggie Hassan plans to nominate the Department of Health and Human Services Intergovernmental Affairs Director Jeffrey Meyers to replace DHHS Commissioner Nick Toumpas, who is stepping down after an eight-year tenure at the beginning of 2016.

Cheryl Senter, NHPR

Joseph McQuaid, publisher of the New Hampshire Union Leader, might’ve kicked the proverbial hornet’s nest when he penned a front-page editorial calling Republican frontrunner Donald Trump “a crude blowhard with no clear political philosophy.”

But the newspaperman was simply continuing his outlet’s long-running tradition of cutting presidential candidates down to size. 

You’d be hard-pressed to find a political animal as mystifying, misunderstood and over-analyzed as the so-called “independent” voter of New Hampshire.

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When New Hampshire legalized medical marijuana in July 2013, no one expected the program to be up and running overnight.

Two and a half years later, however, none of the dispensaries envisioned under the new law are open, and the only patient who has received medical marijuana had to file a lawsuit for the right to travel out of state to get it.

So what’s taken so long?

On his latest swing through New Hampshire, Democratic presidential hopeful Martin O'Malley stopped by NHPR's offices in Concord for a conversation with The Exchange

We caught up with O'Malley — a former mayor of Baltimore and governor of Maryland — on his way up to the studios to ask for his (literal) elevator pitch pitch on why he should be president.

Tracy Lee Carroll, NHPR

The 2016 New Hampshire presidential primary is officially on for Feb. 9, one week after the Iowa caucuses.

New Hampshire Secretary of State Bill Gardner, who has the final say on the state’s presidential primary schedule, announced the date Thursday morning, for both the Republican and the Democratic races.

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