Cordelia Zars

News Intern

Cordelia is an intern with NHPR's All Things Considered. 

NHPR

New Hampshire is a state known for its trees. In fact, the Granite State is the second most forested state in the country. Some trees are green, some are white; some are small, and others are . . . mighty. An organization of tree enthusiasts has been finding and documenting New Hampshire’s biggest trees since the 1950’s. 

Global Rescue

If you fall on your hiking trip in Bhutan, or get caught in political upheaval during your study abroad, a New Hampshire company has your back. Global Rescue is a business that has evacuated its clients from some of the most dangerous places on earth. Still, not everyone agrees with their philosophy. 

In 2012, Allan Lokos was on a small plane in Myanmar after a trip with his wife.

“And apparently, the pilot misjudged where we were, and he began to bring the plane down at least a mile short of where it was supposed to be.”

Beavers have been busy this summer, building dams and creating wetlands—in places they're not always welcome. Commercial trappers are getting more calls to remove beavers from neighborhoods this season, and that's due to a drop in international fur prices. When prices for fur drop overseas, the number of beavers in New Hampshire goes up.

Anton Kaska unfolds a beaver trap and wedges it into the swampy ground in a marsh in a Bedford neighborhood. It's designed to catch the beaver around the shoulders and neck.

The Democratic candidates for governor took part in a WGIR radio debate Wednesday. Among other things, the candidates discussed marijuana legalization.

Alvimann / Morguefile

Judo was founded in Japan around 1882. It’s an aggregate of techniques drawn from various martial arts. It’s been an Olympic sport since 1964 and has been gaining popularity ever since.

What does it look like?

“Bodies flying through the air…you’ll see a lot of them are very acrobatic,” says Jake Freedman, Head Coach of the University of New Hampshire Judo Club. “They may go very high into the air, and somehow spin in the air like a cat, and land on their fronts.”

David P. Whelan / Morguefile

It’s easy enough to check the weather before you head out for a hike. Maybe you click on the weather app on your smartphone, scan for thunderstorms, and plan accordingly. But when it comes to going for a swim, real-time information on water conditions is not just a click away.

Jack Rodolico, NHPR

This week, NHPR has been looking at what homelessness means in New Hampshire. As part of our series No Place to Go: Homeless in New Hampshire,  we visited the PK Motel in Effingham, and heard about how having a roof over your head isn’t the same as having a home.

So where is that line so many families are straddling, between financial insecurity and having no place to live?

Dean Christon is Executive Director of New Hampshire’s Housing Finance Authority and he joined NHPR’s Peter Biello to talk through some of these issues.

David Brooks / Concord Monitor

As software becomes more sophisticated, it has taken over jobs usually completed by humans or machines. A new kind of software technology called “Software-Defined Networking” is enabling software to take the place of certain kinds of machinery. A lab in Durham has recently begun taking a closer look at Software-Defined Networking, and Granite Geek David Brooks joined NHPR’s Peter Biello to give us the details.

Bryan Hanson / Morguefile

The National Fish and Wildlife Foundation announced a million dollars in grants Tuesday to restore New Hampshire’s forest and fish habitat.

Eight organizations received funding to restore wildlife habitat in New Hampshire, Vermont, Connecticut, and Maine. Collectively, the groups will open nearly 200 miles of streams for fish passage and improve habitat for the New England Cottontail, American woodcock, and golden-winged warblers.

Eversource, New Hampshire’s largest electric utility, is donating the bulk of the funding.

Atlantic White Shark Conservancy

Great white sharks have been active in east coast waters this summer. This week a shark was detected off the shore of Salisbury Massachusetts near the New Hampshire border.

To help protect beach-goers, scientists have developed an App called “Sharktivity.” “Sharktivity” can notify you if any tagged sharks have been detected on receivers across the east coast.  You can also use the app to report a shark, if you’ve seen one.

Josh Rogers, NHPR

New Hampshire Attorney General Joe Foster and the New Hampshire ACLU filed “amicus” briefs in court on Thursday. The briefs side with the Obama Administration in a lawsuit brought by Texas and 10 other states that pushes back against federal guidance urging schools to allow students to use bathrooms that correspond with their gender identity.

Casey McDermott, NHPR

New Hampshire Party Chair and Delegate Ray Buckley is wrapping up his week in Philadelphia at the Democratic National Convention. Buckley is the first openly gay politician to serve as President of the Association of State Democratic Chairs and a Vice Chair of the Democratic National Committee. Buckley has met several times with the DNC’s LGBT Caucus this week, and he joined NHPR’s Peter Biello Thursday to discuss their final meeting.

Give us a sense of what issues the LGBT Caucus has been discussing this week.

grzessiek / Morguefile

Seven mothers took up the stage at the Democratic National Convention to speak out against gun violence in America. In addition to voicing support for Democratic nominee for President Hillary Clinton, they condemned alleged police brutality and racism in the justice system. They also advocated for what they called “Common-Sense” gun control. Sybrina Fulton, mother of Trayvon Martin, said, “Hillary Clinton has the compassion and understanding to comfort a grieving mother. She has the courage to lead the fight for common-sense gun legislation.”

Republican gubernatorial candidate Chris Sununu continues to draw fire from his rivals. During a debate on WGIR radio Wednesday morning, Republican Frank Edelblut said Sununu's Executive Council vote to fund Planned Parenthood was not conservative. Sununu defended his vote.

Mary RN / Morguefile

Astrid Silva came to the United States as an undocumented Mexican immigrant and she spoke last night at the Democratic Convention in favor of Hillary Clinton. She said, “I know she will fight to keep our families together. Nuestras familias. I know she will.”

Joining NHPR’s Peter Biello today to discuss issues of immigration in New Hampshire is Alejandro Urrutia, a doctor originally from Mexico.

Van McLeod, Commissioner of the New Hampshire Department of Cultural Resources, died Monday morning.

He was commissioner for 24 years. McLeod oversaw the Council of the Arts, the Television and Film Office, the State Library, and the Division of Historical Resources. He was instrumental in developing New Hampshire’s cultural community.

Moocall

Students at the University of New Hampshire are using a device called “Moocall” to monitor pregnant cows at night. The technology was developed in Ireland in 2015; UNH is one of two universities in the States to use the sensor for agricultural research. 

The sensor attaches to the cow’s tail and records movements that coincide with birthing contractions. When things start getting serious, the sensor sends a text message to the researcher, who can run into the field to help the cow give birth.

Elodie Reed / Concord Monitor

Concord Monitor reporter Elodie Reed has been following the life of a pig at a New Hampshire farm from its birth to death for the newspaper’s Ag and Eats blog. It’s an attempt to understand what goes into the creation of the meat many of us consume. NHPR’s Peter Biello spoke with Elodie when she began this project, and now it’s drawing to a close. She joined Peter another time to talk about what she’s learned.

Momma of 3 Beauties / Morguefile

Two loons have died in New Hampshire this summer from ingesting lead fishing tackle. This comes after the state strengthened a law earlier in the season to restrict lead fishing gear.

New Hampshire Fish and Game reports that the two birds died in lakes near Lempster and Stoddard. Metal jigs and fishing line were found inside the loons' gizzards, and lab tests showed fatal amounts of lead in their blood.

Dodgerton Skillhause / Morguefile

Executive Councilors approved two contracts Wednesday that provide the state with more funding to address the opioid crisis.

About $3 million dollars will go into medical training, medication-assisted treatment, and information about substance use disorder.

Councilor Chris Pappas says he thinks these contracts will have an immediate impact in the state’s ability to handle the drug crisis.

“Make sure we get people the treatment they need; make sure that medications are available for people so they can get well and get over their substance use disorder,” he said.

Darren Hester / Morguefile

The New Hampshire Department of Resources and Economic Development launched an initiative this week to help industries maintain their workforce.

Young people in New Hampshire are gravitating away from manufacturing jobs. And that's not ideal, because manufacturing is the largest driver of the New Hampshire economy.

The Manufacturing Sector Partnership creates a state-wide collaboration for industries to address their workforce needs.

Cordelia Zars / NHPR

Patients, employees, and officials with the VA Medical Center in White River Junction, Vermont came together on Monday to discuss how the hospital could improve. 

Town Halls like this one are a chance for veterans to take their concerns to the highest official at the hospital. But only one man out of about 50 spoke up, saying there had been a confusion in his appointment times. Director Al Montoya spoke at length to the veterans, saying the way to solve these kinds of administrative problems is by increasing communication.

Dodgerton Skillhause / Morguefile

Today, as we follow the developments out of Dallas and the killing of five police officers, and the killing of two black men earlier this week in Louisiana and Minnesota, we’re left with many questions and lots of emotions. We’ve heard a lot from people in Dallas, as well as politicians in D.C.; now, a local perspective. Reena Goldthree is a professor of African and African-American studies at Dartmouth College.  In the past she organized Black Lives Matter protests, and she now teaches a course on the Black Lives Matter movement.  She joined NHPR’s Peter Biello to discuss these issues.

Johanna Eldredge Morrissey

The Bookshelf is NHPR's series on authors and books with ties to the Granite State.  All Things Considered host Peter Biello features authors, covers literary events and publishing trends, and gets recommendations from each guest on what books listeners might want to add to their own bookshelves. If you have an author or book you think we should profile on The Bookshelf, send us an email. The address is books@nhpr.org.

Peter Biello

 

 Spinach, kale, and tomatoes are foods you'll have no trouble finding this time of year in New Hampshire gardens. But take a turn down a little road in Bedford and you’ll find a farm growing plants you may have never seen before, unless you’ve been to Bhutan, or parts of Africa. At Common Earth Farms, refugee families grow vegetables from around the world.

On a day that's expected to be hot, Bhutanese Refugee Dhele Niroula provides a little liquid relief to a row of plants baking in the morning sun. His father and fellow gardener, Khada Niroula, names these plants.

Gustavo Belemmi / Morguefile

If a video designed to recruit people into extremist groups pops up online, it stands to reason that you could just flag it to have it removed and the problem is solved. But that’s not so easy. These videos are easily replicated, so one video could suddenly appear on a variety of websites. It’s time-consuming to track down and try to remove each one. One professor at Dartmouth College has developed software that would help find all those copies.

elmenda / MorgueFile

Champny’s Fireworks in Bow is a family-owned business that has pyrotechnics of every shape and size.

Deborah Colby, the owner of Champny’s Fireworks in Bow, stands in front of a TV display of fireworks, giving her customers a preview of what they buy. Lissa and Jessica Dubois of Hopkinton huddle close to the screen, transfixed.

"These are really cool," they say. 

How many fireworks do they want to buy?

"Like 20," Lissa says.

"More than that!" Jessica says.

N.H. DES

Researchers say an algae called "rock snot" that was thought to be an invasive species in the Northeast is actually native to the northern United States. So if “rock snot” has been here for a long time, why haven’t we noticed it before? To answer this question we turn to Granite Geek David Brooks. He’s a reporter with The Concord Monitor and writer at Granitegeek.org, and he joined NHPR’s Peter Biello to discuss the matter. 

  

C. Zars / NHPR

The medication “Vivitrol” is gaining traction as a tool in the fight against drug addiction. It’s a once-a-month injection that was approved as a treatment for opioid and alcohol users in 2010. A psychiatric hospital in Hampstead now prescribes the medication, and patients seem to show signs of improvement.

The Bookshelf is NHPR's series on authors and books with ties to the Granite State.  All Things Considered host Peter Biello features authors, covers literary events and publishing trends, and gets recommendations from each guest on what books listeners might want to add to their own bookshelves. If you have an author or book you think we should profile on The Bookshelf, send us an email. The address is books@nhpr.org.

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