Dan Tuohy

Digital Engagement Producer

Dan is a long-time New Hampshire journalist who has written for outlets including Foster's Daily Democrat, The Citizen of Laconia, The Boston Globe, and The Eagle-Tribune. He comes to NHPR from the New Hampshire Union Leader, where he reported on state, local, and national politics.

He is a native Granite Stater and a graduate of Saint Michael's College in Colchester, Vt.

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The Trump administration is ending temporary protected status for some 60,000 Haitians living in the U.S. after an earthquake devastated their country in 2010.

This affects between 80 and 150 Haitians in New Hampshire, according to Samson DuClair, president of the Haitian Community Center of N.H. He says these people are worried about being sent back, and many don’t have a home to return to.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

A House committee this week recommended against  a bill to legalize pot in the state - but advocates on both sides are continuing the debate.

Speaking today on NHPR's The Exchange, Kate Frey, vice president of advocacy for New Futures, compares the marijuana industry to the big tobacco and big alcohol industries. 

“It’s a profit-driven industry,” Frey says. “And once ‘Big Marijuana’ moves in, just like ‘Big Alcohol,’ then you have pot shops in your neighborhood, you have highly potent edible products targeted toward kids."  

NHPR File

Don't expect school bus passengers in New Hampshire to be required to buckle up anytime soon.

A committee of state lawmakers studying a school bus seat belt requirement is not recommending any such legislation. The committee was formed in compliance with a House Bill that was signed into law in April.

“There’s just not a lot of data to support that an effort this massive is really going to help,” says Rep. Steven Smith, the committee's chairman.

    

The late October storm that roared into New Hampshire with hurricane-force winds Sunday and Monday caused the fourth-largest power outage in state history. The top five outages all occurred in the past decade, according to the New Hampshire Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Management.

NHPR File

In the final Manchester mayoral debate, challenger Joyce Craig accused incumbent Ted Gatsas of failing to follow protocol when a 14-year-old student was raped at a high school in 2015.

The rape was not made public until earlier this year when the county prosecutor announced that Bryan Wilson, who was 17 at the time, was found guilty and sentenced to 10- to- 20 years for aggravated felonious sexual assault at West High School.

Courtesy

The Maura Murray missing person case has not been "reopened," as an Oxygen Network show called "The Disappearance of Maura Murray" reported earlier this week, because according to New Hampshire officials, the case was never closed.

Voters in Manchester will see two ballot questions on Tuesday. One is something on the ballot in ten other cities this Election Day, a variation of: Shall the city allow the operation of Keno games within the city?

But the other one is a little different. It's a non-binding informational question about the city flag. It reads:

"Which flag would you like to see as the official flag of the city of Manchester?"

Six percent of babies born in New Hampshire have been exposed to opioids.

And the actual number may be higher at this point.

“We are one of the hardest hit areas,” says Dr. Alison Holmes, a pediatrician at Children’s Hospital at Dartmouth.

AP

A week of New Hampshire headlines included yet another big one about the opioid epidemic. 

Elected leaders continue to call attention to the opioid, heroin, and fentanyl epidemic, which President Trump officially labeled a national public health emergency. He singled out Manchester's "Safe Station" program, and Fire Chief Dan Goonan, in his speech.

There was a certain admiration for a century-old supermarket chain as it bucked trends and refused to go online.

Even when Market Basket launched its official website this week, it did so on its on terms. The site is more informational than transactional, like an online brochure rather than a retail outlet.

“They seem to be twenty minutes late to the party launching a website, but they weren’t going to do it until it was strategic and right for them,” says Jay Childs.

KEN WATSON / KENWATSON.NET

An isolated forest fire in North Woodstock is so stubborn that even this rainy weather is not fully putting it out.

Woodstock Fire Chief John MacKay says the Dilly Cliff fire that was first reported Oct. 3 is contained, but some spots are still smoldering.

"With this rain the last two days I’d say it’s probably 90 percent put out," MacKay said today on NHPR's The Exchange.

In a video that's gone viral, Betsey Andrews Parker shows off some dance and lip sync moves for a good cause: the 4th Annual Strafford County Lip Sync Battle.

Andrews Parker is CEO of the Community Action Partnership of Strafford County. The private, non-profit organization seeks to end poverty and funds programs focused on food, education, child care, housing, and utilities assistance.

There may be inertia among some New Hampshire employers when it comes to hiring people with disabilities.

Andrew Houtenville is director of research at the Institute on Disability at UNH. He spoke on NHPR's The Exchange about the challenges those with disabilities face when searching for work.

“I think there’s a lot of inertia,” he says, in terms of employers reaching out to new networks.

The labor market may magnify the issue. New Hampshire's employment rate is one of the lowest in the nation, at 2.7 percent.

A commission studying marijuana legalization is tasked with identifying “the good, the bad, and the ugly.”

That’s how Rep. Patrick Abrami sums it up. He’s the commission's chairman.

Abrami's outline of guidelines at the first meeting of the commission this week points to the workload ahead. And it hints at the disparate voices in this debate.

Abrami issued the good-bad-ugly bit to emphasize that the commission serve as a fact-finding body and that commissioners “leave our biases at home and objectively address this issue.”

New Hampshire Senate Democratic Leader Jeff Woodburn says he will file a bill to ban "bump stocks" for guns if his House counterpart cannot muster support to introduce a similar proposal.

Gun debate continues after the mass shooting in Las Vegas that claimed 58 lives and left hundreds injured last week. Woodburn questions if debate will occur at all in Concord.

After four terms in the House of Representatives, Carol Shea-Porter says she won’t seek reelection in 2018. The Democratic Congresswoman announced Friday her plans to step down when her term ends.

“This has been a very difficult decision, given how much I have enjoyed serving [the people of New Hampshire] in the House and the fact that the 2018 election is shaping up to be like 2006, when I was first elected, an important time when Congress changed political leadership and was able to move America forward,” writes Shea-Porter in a statement.

NH Division of Forests and Lands

Firefighters continue to work to contain a forest fire on Dilly Cliff, which has led to the closure of the Kinsman Ridge Trail area of the Appalachian Trail in North Woodstock.

The fire has burned about 22 acres. It is land owned by the Society for the Protection of NH Forests and the White Mountain National Forest.

Allegra Boverman/NHPR/Stay Work Play

Scott Crowder made sure to give a shout-out to his parents for instilling in him, as he puts it, “the inability to work for somebody else.”

They were fitting remarks for the person honored as New Hampshire's 2017 Young Entrepreneur of the Year.

Senator Jeanne Shaheen calls the mass shooting in Las Vegas an act of terrorism.

 

Shaheen spoke about the incident today on The Exchange. She expressed condolences to the victims and their families. She says the U.S. must address gun violence. She says it can be done while respecting the rights of gun owners.

 

It remains under investigation. But does the heinous act of violence in Las Vegas on Sunday night meet the definition of terrorism?

Matty Bowman photo

Mountaineer Kate Matrosova’s death during a winter traverse of the Northern Presidential Range in 2015 still echoes for some in the White Mountains.

Ty Gagne says the climbing community lost one of their own.

“The North Country in some ways is still rattled by this.”

Gagne is a member of the Androscoggin Valley Search and Rescue Team. He also wrote a book on Matrosova’s tragic last climb that explores backcountry decision-making and risks.

NHPR File

Executive Councilor Andru Volinsky says he will not run for governor in 2018.

He plans to run for re-election to council District 2, which stretches from Charlestown on the Vermont border to Dublin and Keene and over to Dover, Durham, Rochester, and Somersworth.

The Democrat from Concord tells NHPR it's humbling to have friends and supporters encourage him to run. In the end, 2018 was not meant to be.


Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos’ political donations are not all tethered to one party. This holds true in New Hampshire, which plans to submit an underdog bid for the online retailer’s second headquarters.

The Amazon PAC has contributed to a Sununu -- former U.S. Sen. John E. Sununu, the governor’s brother. The PAC gave $2,000 to the former Senator in the 2008 campaign. It donated $1,000 in 2004 to the Daniel Webster PAC, the senator's leadership PAC at the time.

Other Amazon PAC donations, according to Federal Election Commission finance reports, include:

Dan Tuohy/NHPR

Eighty-one people from thirty-seven different countries became U.S. citizens Friday at the New Hampshire Statehouse.

The naturalization ceremony was the first in nearly twenty years held in Representatives Hall.

Presiding Justice Landya McCafferty says it was a special event to coincide with Constitution Week.

Luis Jimenez savored every minute of it. He came to America from the Dominican Republic in the late 1980s. Now he’s a surgeon who lives in Hollis.

“It’s a good feeling. Like you belong,” he says.

Flickr courtesy

Race weekend is here and it's the last hurrah for the NASCAR September series at New Hampshire Motor Speedway. 

Tim Sink, president of the Greater Concord Chamber of Commerce, says this season finale has fans in a celebratory mood, even if it is a little bittersweet.

Track owners announced earlier this year that the Loudon speedway would not host the September race starting in 2018. Speedway Motorsports owns Las Vegas Motor Speedway and New Hampshire Motor Speedway, and plans to move the fall Monster Energy and Camping World Truck Series races to Las Vegas next fall.

  Manchester will get nearly half a million dollars from the state to help police investigate opioid-related drug use and trafficking.

The money is part of a $1.2 million contract between the Division of State Police and local law enforcement agencies.

The funding targets some of the state’s larger cities. The agreement includes $261,767 for Nashua, $62,551 for Concord, $50,000 for Laconia, and $32,000 for Portsmouth. The money will support investigative work, such as overtime expenses.

NHPR File

Controversy over SB 3, a new voting law, remains a partisan cloud over Concord, despite a court ruling this week allowing much of it to take effect.

“Definitely the judge was offering a to-be-continued on this,” Dante Scala, a political science professor at the University of New Hampshire, said Thursday on The Exchange with Laura Knoy.

New Hampshire is considering adding its name to the list of states making a pitch for Amazon's proposed second company headquarters.  

 Taylor Caswell, commissioner of the New Hampshire Department of Business and Economic Affairs, says the "Live Free Or Die" state's quality of life and tax advantages -- including no state income tax -- could be one of the incentives.

  The state committee reviewing Northern Pass has pushed back its deadline to make a decision, but a spokesman for the hydro-electric transmission project tells NHPR, “the end is in sight.”

 

“To use an overused sports analogy,” Martin Murray says, “We’re in the fourth quarter.”

 

Others might say it is overtime.

 

Allegra Boverman/NHPR

Senate Bill 3, the controversial new bill that changes some of the requirements for newly registered voters, gets its first test Tuesday in a special election in Laconia and Belmont. Gov. Chris Sununu says it will protect the integrity of New Hampshire elections.  State Democratic Party Chairman Ray Buckley says it’s voter suppression.

Here are some basic questions on the new law that is being challenged in court.

What is it?

A social and racial justice group is calling on the Claremont Police Department to be more forthcoming with information about injuries suffered by an 8-year-old biracial boy last month.

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