Don Gonyea

It's a headline you can write every election year:

FLORIDA THE BIG BATTLEGROUND IN THIS YEARS' RACE TO THE WHITE HOUSE

But that banner belies significant changes taking place in rapid fashion.

In fact, if your image of Florida politics is senior citizens peppering candidates with questions about Social Security and Medicare, it's time for an update. Or a new headline.

Perhaps something like this:

MILLENNIALS A RISING FORCE IN FLORIDA ELECTIONS

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This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon. Hillary Clinton spent this week meeting voters in what are called battleground states. Many are motivated even more by the need to defeat Donald Trump. NPR's national political correspondent Don Gonyea reports.

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Donald Trump's poll numbers have declined. And NPR national political correspondent Don Gonyea is traveling with the Trump campaign and reports the candidate and his supporters have an explanation if he loses the election.

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Many prominent Republicans are avoiding Cleveland this week. Among the most notable is Senator John McCain. He's campaigning for re-election back home in Arizona. NPR's national political correspondent Don Gonyea caught up with McCain in Flagstaff.

This story from the Detroit suburbs is a part of A Nation Engaged, a series where NPR and several member stations are taking a look at battleground communities.


Donald Trump is pinning his election hopes on a group of voters with long ties to the Democratic Party, but who've been known to abandon that loyalty — from time to time — to vote Republican.

We're talking working-class white men, especially union members, the Reagan Democrats of the 1980s.

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Updated at 7:40 p.m. ET with Senate votes

To virtually no one's surprise, the Senate failed to advance any of the four gun control proposals — two offered by Democrats, and two by Republicans — that came in response to last week's mass shooting in Orlando, Fla.

Here are the results:

Editor's note: This post contains language and photos some readers may find inappropriate.

I've covered presidential campaigns for decades. I've never had to bleep — or drop an asterisk into — a candidate's speech.

Until this year.

Take this Donald Trump quote from a rally in Virginia:

"We're gonna win with the military. We're gonna knock the s*** out of ISIS. We're gonna knock the s*** out of them."

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Now we're going to talk about the presumptive Republican nominee, Donald Trump. He talked about the Orlando attack during a speech in New Hampshire.

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Everywhere you turn in the world of sports, in seemingly every league, in amateur, college and professional ranks, you find athletes carrying the banner of some sort of political protest. But it started with Muhammad Ali.

Today, there's LeBron James, Dwyane Wade and their teammates wearing gray hoodies in support of Trayvon Martin.

The Chicago Bulls' Derrick Rose donning a T-shirt that reads "I CAN'T BREATHE" before another game.

Minnesota Vikings punter Chris Kluwe taking a stand in favor of same-sex marriage.

The battle between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump for the White House is likely to center on the Rust Belt — the industrial Midwest where trade is a big issue for many voters and where the presumptive Republican nominee is predicting he will be able to cut into the Democratic Party's traditional dominance among members of labor unions.

This post was updated at 5:30 p.m. EDT.

At least $1.9 million of the donations to veterans groups that presumptive Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump reported on Tuesday came in last week, after Trump began responding to intense media scrutiny of his earlier claims about raising in excess of $6 million for veterans. Trump said on Tuesday that his efforts raised a total of $5.6 million.

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On Thursday, Donald Trump reached the magic number — 1,237. That's the number of delegates needed to clinch the Republican nomination, and he got there after 29 unbound Republican delegates decided to support him at the convention.

NPR's Don Gonyea spoke to some of those delegates to ask what made them decide to support Trump.

Ben Koppelman, Republican Convention Delegate From North Dakota

On switching support from Cruz to Trump

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When New Jersey Governor Chris Christie dropped out of the GOP race in February, he quickly endorsed Donald Trump. Last night, Trump returned the favor by raising money to pay off the Christie campaign's debt. NPR's Don Gonyea reports.

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And I'm David Greene in Bozeman, Mont. We're broadcasting this morning from the Feed Cafe - quite an audience here. Good morning everyone.

(APPLAUSE)

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Donald Trump made his first campaign stop as the Republican Party's de facto nominee. He was stumping in Charleston, W. Va., ahead of that state's primary next week.

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Donald Trump is going to be the Republican nominee for president. Today, John Kasich, the last of Trump's 16 Republican opponents, suspended his campaign. Last night, Ted Cruz did the same after losing the Indiana primary to Trump.

Donald Trump is the apparent GOP presidential nominee after his two remaining rivals ended their White House bids.

Ohio Gov. John Kasich suspended his campaign Wednesday evening in Columbus. Texas Sen. Ted Cruz dropped out of the race Tuesday night after a disappointing loss in Indiana.

The rapid moves in the past 24 hours bring to a close a wild GOP primary season that leaves the one-time unlikely candidate as the party's apparent nominee.

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As we mentioned, the last polls in Indiana closed a short time ago, and Donald Trump is projected to win the Republican primary there. And that victory is a crippling blow to Senator Ted Cruz and the forces in the Republican Party trying to stop Trump.

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